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Author Topic: Is a Jesuit cassock different?  (Read 8978 times)

Joe_Frances

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Is a Jesuit cassock different?
« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2009, 06:57:pm »
The Jesuit cassock went the way of Jesuit adherence to orthodoxy around 1970.  When it still existed, it was a buttonless cassock with a relatively thin sash that was of tough material that was wound around the mid-section several times and tied in a special way that I can't describe in writing.  The collar had no square notch as does a Roman collar.  It was closed in front by two fasteners and the white collar simply went around the whole neck in a manner similar to the type of collar that a Brother might wear.  In fact, there was no difference between the cassock of the Jesuit priest or brother.

Up until the late 40s there was also a large rosary on the sash/belt. That went first, then the rest.  

I know all this because I was a friend of several Scholastics at Fordham, some of whom wore their cassocks until around 1970, as I indicated.  Anyone who wore a cassock after that was in a wheelchair or was acting the part of a ecclesiastical dandy and was the subject of jokes.

The_Harlequin_King

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Is a Jesuit cassock different?
« Reply #11 on: January 26, 2009, 07:09:pm »
Oh, I forgot to add:

Quote
So in theory, a priest with a cassock in, say, 1914 could have less than 33 buttons?

My friend, you are thinking too hard. Many cassocks don't and didn't have buttons at all. The 33-button thing has never been strictly observed.
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Archangelum

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Is a Jesuit cassock different?
« Reply #12 on: January 28, 2009, 01:49:pm »
That's odd, I had a hunch James would have some photos up his sleeve to post an eloquent answer for this question of mine. Yes, that collar is exactly what I was talking about. I must have been confused because I have some death cards that showed priests with that collar - all Jesuits. I also want to say thanks to Joe_Frances - that was very interesting. So it would seem Jesuits indeed had different cassocks but I don't think I have ever seen the type Joe describes.

I uploaded the image that sparked my question:
http://img217.imageshack.us/my.php?image=cassocksz2.jpg

What denomination would this be? Catholic? It's a German priest (?) from about 1914, most likely a military chaplain.

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DarkKnight

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Is a Jesuit cassock different?
« Reply #13 on: January 28, 2009, 03:38:pm »

Are you referring to the lavender, rainbow or Hawaiian lining so popular nowadays?

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The_Harlequin_King

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Is a Jesuit cassock different?
« Reply #14 on: January 28, 2009, 05:52:pm »
Quote from: Archangelum
I uploaded the image that sparked my question:
http://img217.imageshack.us/my.php?image=cassocksz2.jpg

What denomination would this be? Catholic? It's a German priest (?) from about 1914, most likely a military chaplain.


I have no idea; I'd say most likely Catholic, but there is a possibility of Lutheran. As I hinted at before, it's almost instinctual nowadays to associate the cassock and Roman collar with a Catholic priest, especially a traditional priest; but by all accounts I've read, the collar originated from Anglican fashion, and Catholic priests were not the only ones to wear cassocks circa 1914. Also, contrary to popular trad belief, clerical suits (short jackets) already existed at this time.
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Robb

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Is a Jesuit cassock different?
« Reply #15 on: January 28, 2009, 06:14:pm »
Here's what's considered the "typical" Jesuit cassock




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MagisterMusicae

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Is a Jesuit cassock different?
« Reply #16 on: January 29, 2009, 12:08:am »
Anglican cassock is double breasted without buttons.

In Robb's top picture, the guy on the left has an Anglican Cassock.

The center guy has a Roman cassock. It has 33 buttoms and a Roman Collar.

The guy on the right has on a Semi-Jesuit Cassock. It has hidden buttons or no buttons at all and clips. It is semi-Jesuit because it has a Roman Collar on top.

A full Jesuit cassock is as the Semi-Jesuit, but without the notch for the collar. A Jesuit collar sticks up beyond the black band, but does not have the notch in the front. A good example is the Napoleon Dynamite picture.

It was typical in the past for U.S. priests to wear clericals (pants, shirt with full white collar and a coat). The regulation used to be that the coat had to come to at least the knees, hence the coats you see in the picture above.