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Author Topic: Classical Liberal Arts Academy  (Read 3573 times)

Underdog

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Classical Liberal Arts Academy
« on: June 21, 2009, 02:30:pm »
http://www.classicalliberalarts.com/

Very interested in their distance learning program.  Not a trad school, but they use the Balt Cat and the courses are based on the Jesuits circa 16th-17th century.  I belong to a Yahoo! group that has a discussion going on right now concerning the school's admission requirements.  I've quoted part below.  It is very upsetting to the prots.

Quote
    1.  Catholic Christian Culture
Non-Catholic families are welcome to study in the CLAA, let that be clear.  However, it is a matter of fact that the principles of Protestantism and Evangelicalism are inconsistent with the principles of true classical learning.  In other words, there can be no such thing as a "Genuine Protestant Classical Education".  This reality will not be understood until children enter into Dialectic and Philosophy, but families must be aware of it at the outset.  In American society, religions are treated as equals by those ignorant of their differences and concerned only with material things, but in classical studies the differences become very clear.

 

First, Protestant principles of knowledge, such as "Sola Scriptura", private interpretation and the disregard for tradition are contrary to the principles of the Art of Logic and hinder the study of true philosophy.  A student in the CLAA will have to abandon Protestant principles in order to study philosophy rightly.

 

Second, when we consider the cultural benefits non-Catholic students lack.  Catholic students enjoy a consecrated annual calendar, a crowd of saints and blesseds to study and imitate, sacraments and sacramentals to enrich their spiritual devotion and offer it to their senses as well as their faith, a sense of fellowship in a universal Christian society that extends back to Christ himself and examples of Christians who have traveled this same course in the past.   Non-Catholic children are often left to think that they must choose between the whole world and a Bible, which makes choosing the world much easier.

 

Third, and most importantly, it must be remembered that the highest and best destination for students in the classical liberal arts curriculum is religious life, where the principles of Truth, Goodness and Beauty are most perfectly fulfilled by those who love them most.   Students who are raised with no prospect of religious vocations are forced down paths to which they may not be called simply because their parents' reject other paths.  This, of all things, is the greatest danger for non-Catholic students.  In God's will, there is no need to force education to end in money-making or college admission.  History's greatest classically trained minds have this in common: they found their life's calling in a spiritual, not material vocation.

 

Of course, many non-Catholic families contend that they know many Catholic families who are worse that non-Catholics.  However, they must realize that the Catholic students in public schools or in non-Catholic cultural circles are normally not the children of good Catholic families.  It is easily demonstrated that Catholic children raised in traditional Catholic homes enjoy the richest Christian culture possible and are normally very well behaved.

 

Parents should only enroll a child if they are committed to fully supporting Academy studies and maintain a culture that is conducive to learning.  Parents cannot enroll their children for rigorous studies that their family will prevent them from completing.  This includes showing their children necessary love and affection, providing necessary study materials, eliminating avoidable distractions and obstacles, contributing to the efficient operation of the Academy, providing academic assistance to the student and demonstrating a genuine appreciation for the student's work.  The family must model the virtues sought through study and gently push the students along.

 

Families must also commit to cultivating a spirit of sobriety and maturity among their children, rather than allowing the perpetual childishness that ruins American children.  Children are considered morally accountable by the age of their first confession and this should be taken seriously.  There is no excuse for inordinate play, entertainment, etc..  "Youth is the time for extraordinary toil." said Plato.
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libby

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Re: Classical Liberal Arts Academy
« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2009, 03:59:pm »
Underdog, I looked at the site.

It looks fantastic.

Thanks for posting it!

And, by the way, I've found that sometimes when protestants get very upset, some tend to convert.

:)

Underdog

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Re: Classical Liberal Arts Academy
« Reply #2 on: June 22, 2009, 05:04:pm »
I'm seriously considering their Catechism I & Grammar I classes for my son (8yo).  He memorizes very easily, and is quite intelligent (I haven't pushed him nearly as much as I should).  I expect he will really enjoy online classes, and perhaps finally get around to using the children's typing software I bought a while back.  If he does well, we will probably enroll our 6yo next year.  The nice thing is, I'd be able to get rid of all the fluff (extra curricula) that I've accumulated.
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libby

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Re: Classical Liberal Arts Academy
« Reply #3 on: June 22, 2009, 05:25:pm »
Have you ever heard of Angelicum Academy?

http://www.angelicum.net/

I loved them. We did them one year, but I was unable to continue - they use the Great  Books, have online discussion, language programs, etc. My then 9 year old was discussing books online, with microphone and headset - although I heard every word. Plus, there was an adult moderator guiding the conversation.

I bet that your oldest will just eat up the online classes....and I know about the extra fluff.. ::)

Underdog

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Re: Classical Liberal Arts Academy
« Reply #4 on: June 22, 2009, 05:52:pm »
I like Angelicum Academy's book lists very well, esp how they break them up by grade (so that age-appropriate books can be found easily).

What program/curricula are you using right now?  I plan to use All About Spelling, New American Cursive, and Right Start Math with my 6yo.  I recently got rid of SWR (Spell to Write and Read); it was just too much of a drain on my time.  We've also used Prima Latina, and we were planning to continue with Latina Christiana 1, but that may change now that I've found CLAA.

Another thing I really like about CLAA so far is that the owner really encourages praying the Liturgy of the Hours.  I've been wanting to do this for a while, and am planning to purchase the book Divine Office from Angelus Press this Friday (pay day  ;)  ).  We'll see how it goes (or if I flop big time--haha).
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libby

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Re: Classical Liberal Arts Academy
« Reply #5 on: June 22, 2009, 06:19:pm »
I like Angelicum Academy's book lists very well, esp how they break them up by grade (so that age-appropriate books can be found easily).

What program/curricula are you using right now?  I plan to use All About Spelling, New American Cursive, and Right Start Math with my 6yo.  I recently got rid of SWR (Spell to Write and Read); it was just too much of a drain on my time.  We've also used Prima Latina, and we were planning to continue with Latina Christiana 1, but that may change now that I've found CLAA.

Another thing I really like about CLAA so far is that the owner really encourages praying the Liturgy of the Hours.  I've been wanting to do this for a while, and am planning to purchase the book Divine Office from Angelus Press this Friday (pay day  ;)  ).  We'll see how it goes (or if I flop big time--haha).

aw, Underdog...

 :awww:

you won't flop!

:)


But I know what you mean - it's hard not to question yourself the whole time. But that shows what a good Mom you are!!! And if Scippy trusts you and has no problem with you leading as far as the schooling goes, then you have to allow for mistakes.Plus, wait till you have more. You REALLY have to tailor the program to each individual child - and that's the glory of HS. I know you already know that, butMAN wait till actually happens.

Sounds like both of you have really good educations under your belt - so I guess that your problem is being so eager to teach them things!! Good problem!

We use a modified Mother of Divine Grace - not my first choice, but it's what the hybrid school that we're in right now uses. They modify it quite a bit as well - :)

Anything I feel they are lacking, I either put in myself, or do a teeny bit of unschooling and guide the boy towards something, until he wants to study it himself.

We use Latina Christiana I and II, and switch to Henle in 7th grade.We start Latin and Greek roots in the 3rd grade.


 My preferred handwriting? Palmer. It was long gone by the time I started school, but I think it's beautiful!

 :laughing:

I actually tried to teach it to my oldest, but everyone kept claiming it was child abuse, and the school doesn't use that program anyway.

Math- Saxon. I DESPISE Saxon ( no offense to anyone who uses it )...I can't stand it. One of my guys is trying to catch up because of developmental delays, so I use Teaching Textbooks on him. I really like that one!! I could hear the guy on the CD talk for hours -- honestly, you just want to go and have a beer with the guy, his voice is so pleasant.The little ones, I use Math-u-see. Can't go wrong with decimal street.

:)

English -American Cardinal readers, Catholic National readers.... all the way up to Voyages in English (7th grade). A lot of people hate Voyages, but it has everything you need in it. I like it.

We may start the Liturgy of the Hours at school next year!! We do the Angelus, the Regina Caeli, and the Table blessing ( sung in Latin). Divine Mercy and Rosary when we can - time is limited at the school, and they expect you to do many things at home.

I would LOVE to hear how it goes with CLAA!!!

It's SO cool that y'all are doing this.

:)



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Re: Classical Liberal Arts Academy
« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2009, 04:22:am »
http://www.classicalliberalarts.com/

Very interested in their distance learning program.  Not a trad school, but they use the Balt Cat and the courses are based on the Jesuits circa 16th-17th century.  I belong to a Yahoo! group that has a discussion going on right now concerning the school's admission requirements.  I've quoted part below.  It is very upsetting to the prots.

Quote
    1.  Catholic Christian Culture
Non-Catholic families are welcome to study in the CLAA, let that be clear.  However, it is a matter of fact that the principles of Protestantism and Evangelicalism are inconsistent with the principles of true classical learning.  In other words, there can be no such thing as a "Genuine Protestant Classical Education".  This reality will not be understood until children enter into Dialectic and Philosophy, but families must be aware of it at the outset.  In American society, religions are treated as equals by those ignorant of their differences and concerned only with material things, but in classical studies the differences become very clear.

 

First, Protestant principles of knowledge, such as "Sola Scriptura", private interpretation and the disregard for tradition are contrary to the principles of the Art of Logic and hinder the study of true philosophy.  A student in the CLAA will have to abandon Protestant principles in order to study philosophy rightly.

 

Second, when we consider the cultural benefits non-Catholic students lack.  Catholic students enjoy a consecrated annual calendar, a crowd of saints and blesseds to study and imitate, sacraments and sacramentals to enrich their spiritual devotion and offer it to their senses as well as their faith, a sense of fellowship in a universal Christian society that extends back to Christ himself and examples of Christians who have traveled this same course in the past.   Non-Catholic children are often left to think that they must choose between the whole world and a Bible, which makes choosing the world much easier.

 

Third, and most importantly, it must be remembered that the highest and best destination for students in the classical liberal arts curriculum is religious life, where the principles of Truth, Goodness and Beauty are most perfectly fulfilled by those who love them most.   Students who are raised with no prospect of religious vocations are forced down paths to which they may not be called simply because their parents' reject other paths.  This, of all things, is the greatest danger for non-Catholic students.  In God's will, there is no need to force education to end in money-making or college admission.  History's greatest classically trained minds have this in common: they found their life's calling in a spiritual, not material vocation.

 

Of course, many non-Catholic families contend that they know many Catholic families who are worse that non-Catholics.  However, they must realize that the Catholic students in public schools or in non-Catholic cultural circles are normally not the children of good Catholic families.  It is easily demonstrated that Catholic children raised in traditional Catholic homes enjoy the richest Christian culture possible and are normally very well behaved.

 

Parents should only enroll a child if they are committed to fully supporting Academy studies and maintain a culture that is conducive to learning.  Parents cannot enroll their children for rigorous studies that their family will prevent them from completing.  This includes showing their children necessary love and affection, providing necessary study materials, eliminating avoidable distractions and obstacles, contributing to the efficient operation of the Academy, providing academic assistance to the student and demonstrating a genuine appreciation for the student's work.  The family must model the virtues sought through study and gently push the students along.

 

Families must also commit to cultivating a spirit of sobriety and maturity among their children, rather than allowing the perpetual childishness that ruins American children.  Children are considered morally accountable by the age of their first confession and this should be taken seriously.  There is no excuse for inordinate play, entertainment, etc..  "Youth is the time for extraordinary toil." said Plato.

For future reference when your kids get middle school age you might want to look into The College of Saint Thomas More in Fort Worth. They have a preparatory school called Lady Margaret Roper that works with home schooled kids, so I guess it could be like a hybrid situation. The college is setup based on classical library arts. Its very small and still pretty new, so you may not have heard about it. But you should check it out.

http://www.cstm.edu/index.html
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