Choose style:

Author Topic: Traditional communion hymns  (Read 11051 times)

Lagrange

Traditional communion hymns
« on: September 17, 2009, 03:25:am »
Hello all.

I have a blank, and anyway, my knowledge of liturgical music is rather limited.

Does anyone know of a communion hymn, which is simple (as in, still traditional yet not overly intricate), and which contains a hoperful eschatological overtones?

It would be fitting for a Requiem Mass I would say.

God bless. 
Saint Thomas Aquinas' simple yet profound advice concerning sanctity (said to his sister): "Will it"

F-14 Dave

Re: Traditional communion hymns
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2009, 04:01:am »
I'm not sure if this is fitting for a Requiem Mass, but "Jesus, My Lord, My God, My All" is one of my favorite Communion hymns.

Here's a link to the music:  http://www.cpdl.org/wiki/images/sheet/anon-jes.pdf

I can't stop blubbering when my children's Catholic school choir sing the chorus:
Sweet Sacrament, we Thee adore,
O make us love Thee more and more,
O make us love Thee more and more.
AMDG!

CG

Re: Traditional communion hymns
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2009, 05:53:am »
This text is ascribed to Ephraim the Syrian (c. 306-73), translated by C.W. Humphreys (1841-1931) and Percy Dearmer (1867-1936). 

1.  Strengthen for service, Lord, the hands
       that holy things have taken;
     Let ears that now have heard thy songs
       to clamor never waken.

2.  Lord, may the tongues which 'Holy' sang
        keep free from all deceiving;
     The eyes which saw thy love be bright,
        thy bles-sed hope perceiving.

3.  The feet that tread thy holy courts
         from light do thou not banish;
      The bodies by thy Body fed
         with thy new life replenish.

CG

Re: Traditional communion hymns
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2009, 06:00:am »
From glory to glory advancing, we praise thee, O Lord

From glory to glory advancing, we praise thee, O Lord;
thy name with the Father and Spirit be ever adored.

From strength unto strength we go forward on Zion's highway,
to appear before God in the city of infinite day.

Thanksgiving, and glory and worship, and blessing and love,
one heart and one song have the saints upon earth and above.

Evermore, O Lord, to thy servants thy presence be nigh;
ever fit us by service on earth for thy service on high.


Words: Liturgy of Saint James;
trans. Charles William Humphreys, 1906

Music: Sheen, St. Keverne

Meter: 14 14 14 15

Credo

Re: Traditional communion hymns
« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2009, 06:03:am »
Suzanne Toolan's I Am the Bread of Life comes to mind. Not the stupid gender-neutral one, but the original. The hymn is best played with a men's choir, with the possible aid of an organ. It is hardly "traditional" insofar as the hymn wasn't produced on or before the make-or-break date of 1962, but it's edifying nonetheless. I remember that being played at my father's funeral as a boy. The hymn can be quite dramatic when the music (if present) is cut on the last two lines of the refrain at the very end of the song.
I promise not to put anything here which might help us question our mind-forged manacles, inspire us, or help us in any way at all.

N.B.: I will not be posting on this site again until the Christmas octave. Have a good Advent.


Lagrange

Re: Traditional communion hymns
« Reply #5 on: September 17, 2009, 06:26:am »
Suzanne Toolan's I Am the Bread of Life comes to mind. Not the stupid gender-neutral one, but the original. The hymn is best played with a men's choir, with the possible aid of an organ. It is hardly "traditional" insofar as the hymn wasn't produced on or before the make-or-break date of 1962, but it's edifying nonetheless. I remember that being played at my father's funeral as a boy. The hymn can be quite dramatic when the music (if present) is cut on the last two lines of the refrain at the very end of the song.

I don't mean to be simplistic with the 1962 ''barrier point''. I simply mean traditional to entail what is in conformity with the Faith, what is permeated by a Catholic mentality. With hymns there's room for much ''development'' in this regard - of course, at the same time, not spurning the great hymns made in ages past. With the Mass itself it's somewhat different; development, even if in conformity with Faith, ought not be done needlessly or ''for the heck of it'' (as one will create hymns, which is a past-time activity in some ways). 
Saint Thomas Aquinas' simple yet profound advice concerning sanctity (said to his sister): "Will it"

The_Harlequin_King

Re: Traditional communion hymns
« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2009, 06:38:am »
If we're talking about the TLM, it should be noted that vernacular hymns aren't allowed during Communion in a sung Mass ("high Mass" or solemn Mass). It has to be in Latin. However, vernacular hymns are permitted before and after (such as processional and recessional), since those parts are not technically Mass.
Please read and subscribe to my blog: Modern Medievalism. Applying old-world solutions to new-world problems.



Praying for the dead is important. PM me if you need a cantor for the Requiem Mass of a deceased friend or family member. Have cassock and surplice, will travel. (Will also do weddings for a reasonable price.)

Tim

Re: Traditional communion hymns
« Reply #7 on: September 17, 2009, 04:56:pm »
HK, isn't the Tantum Ergo, or the Pange Lingua the common for Communion? I know I love them.
tim

The_Harlequin_King

Re: Traditional communion hymns
« Reply #8 on: September 17, 2009, 05:25:pm »
HK, isn't the Tantum Ergo, or the Pange Lingua the common for Communion? I know I love them.
tim

You mean, are they customary as additional hymns? Certainly. But the only prescribed music for the duration of Communion at Mass is, of course, the Communio antiphon, which is part of the minor Propers of the day's Mass. (In the case of the Requiem, it's 'Lux Aeterna'). It can be repeated and divided by psalm verses, just as the Introit typically is.

'Pange Lingua (Gloriosi Mysterium)', as a liturgical hymn, is assigned for processions at the feast of Corpus Christi and Maundy Thursday.

'Tantum Ergo' derives from the last two stanzas of 'Pange Lingua' and is assigned for Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament.
Please read and subscribe to my blog: Modern Medievalism. Applying old-world solutions to new-world problems.



Praying for the dead is important. PM me if you need a cantor for the Requiem Mass of a deceased friend or family member. Have cassock and surplice, will travel. (Will also do weddings for a reasonable price.)

AgnusDei1989

Re: Traditional communion hymns
« Reply #9 on: September 18, 2009, 07:45:am »
There are a couple of gorgeous ones by Palestrina: O Bone Jesu and O Domine Jesu Christe. Both, with their plea for mercy and their  hushed, reverent settings, would be great for Communion hymns at any Mass, but a Requiem would be especially wonderful.
Verbis defectis, musica incipit.

"Music is God's gift to man, the only art of Heaven given to earth, the only art of earth we take to Heaven." -- Walter Savage Landor