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Rhyming Prayers

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Su:

--- Quote from: INPEFESS on December 19, 2011, 11:08:am ---I was not judging. I offered by opinion and then added a qualifier that you did not care to reproduce in your citation of my post.

--- End quote ---
My post was not directed to a single post. It did not quote anybody.

It was to the topic which was posted about "rhyming prayers".



--- Quote ---How does this apply to me?

--- End quote ---
It is a general statement about being careful about judging. It applies to you as much as anyone.


--- Quote ---Sure. But what's your point?

--- End quote ---
"Careful about judging".

That was my point.


--- Quote ---I said "often;' I didn't say "always." Certainly, there are exceptions, as I acknowledged in my original comment.

--- End quote ---
Yes, I know. What is your point?

I made a comment on a thread about a general topic. It was not directed at anyone in particular. If you want me to act like it was a directed towards a post in particular, I will not. I used the fragment of one of your posts to show that the issue this thread is about is probably not "rhyming prayers" because many prayers do rhyme.

newyorkcatholic:
INPEFESS, you did say:


--- Quote from: INPEFESS on December 19, 2011, 03:59:am ---I personally dislike them because the meaning and words of the prayer often seem to get lost admidst an almost 'sing-songy' and rhythmic allure, but I'm sure that for some they are very useful, helpful, and delightful.

--- End quote ---

I agree with you, but I think su was pointing out that if we say we dislike rhyming prayers we are including the Dies Irae in the category, so we shouldn't phrase our view that way. 

We should say "I dislike most rhyming prayers" or "rhyming prayers for children," or "I dislike them when the words get lost amidst..."

INPEFESS:

--- Quote from: su on December 19, 2011, 11:56:am ---
--- Quote from: INPEFESS on December 19, 2011, 11:08:am ---I was not judging. I offered by opinion and then added a qualifier that you did not care to reproduce in your citation of my post.

--- End quote ---
My post was not directed to a single post. It did not quote anybody.

It was to the topic which was posted about "rhyming prayers".

[...]

I made a comment on a thread about a general topic. It was not directed at anyone in particular
 
--- End quote ---

Sure, which is why I asked why you said it. Your response to my question of why you said it was a quotation of what I said. So, though the applicability of your post may not have been limited to my post, it would be reasonable to deduce that it included it. It was, after all, offered as an example of what you meant by 'not judging.'


--- Quote ---
--- Quote ---How does this apply to me?

--- End quote ---
It is a general statement about being careful about judging. It applies to you as much as anyone.

--- End quote ---

Again, who is judging? Am I not allowed to offer my opinion without being accused of judging? I stated that other people may feel differently, and that there was no problem with that, but that I, personally, did not like them, and then, only then, conditionally.


--- Quote ---
--- Quote ---Sure. But what's your point?

--- End quote ---
"Careful about judging".

That was my point.
--- End quote ---

Who judged? Your point seems very ironic considering that no-one judged. Isn't that like warning the participants at Mass not to speak heresy when no-one is speaking heresy?


--- Quote --- If you want me to act like it was a directed towards a post in particular, I will not.
--- End quote ---
I do not want this. I am simply curious why you said what you said and then supported it with my post.


--- Quote --- I used the fragment of one of your posts to show that the issue this thread is about is probably not "rhyming prayers" because many prayers do rhyme.

--- End quote ---

O.K. Well, then, that is all you had to say. Your point was unclear by the way you chose to present it: "Don't judge . . ."

INPEFESS:

--- Quote from: newyorkcatholic on December 19, 2011, 11:57:am ---INPEFESS, you did say:


--- Quote from: INPEFESS on December 19, 2011, 03:59:am ---I personally dislike them because the meaning and words of the prayer often seem to get lost admidst an almost 'sing-songy' and rhythmic allure, but I'm sure that for some they are very useful, helpful, and delightful.

--- End quote ---

I agree with you, but I think su was pointing out that if we say we dislike rhyming prayers we are including the Dies Irae in the category, so we shouldn't phrase our view that way. 

We should say "I dislike most rhyming prayers" or "rhyming prayers for children," or "I dislike them when the words get lost amidst..."

--- End quote ---

Okay, but wasn't that clear from what I said? I said I dislike them because the meaning and words of the prayer often seem to get lost amidst an almost 'sing-songy' and rhythmic allure.

Wouldn't that mean that if there were no sing-songy rhythmic allure (such as the Dies Irae) I wouldn't dislike it?

That was all I meant to say.

INPEFESS:

--- Quote from: su on December 19, 2011, 11:56:am ---
--- End quote ---

I think I see what you're saying now.

My point was this: "I said I dislike them because the meaning and words of the prayer often seem to get lost amidst an almost 'sing-songy' and rhythmic allure. Wouldn't that mean that if there were no sing-songy rhythmic allure (such as the Dies Irae) I wouldn't dislike it?"

But I think you understand this. I think your problem is simply with the lack of technical accuracy with the way I worded it. Though the meaning was implied by the end of the sentence, you thought I should have added a qualifier before the word "dislike" to agree with the end of the sentence for the sake of clarity, correct?

Yes, I will accept that.

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