Choose style:

Author Topic: Is sterilization ever medically necessary?  (Read 2691 times)

MarysChild

  • Guest
Is sterilization ever medically necessary?
« on: July 29, 2005, 08:21:am »
Sterilization (vasectomy for men, tubal litigation for women) to prevent the conception of children is immoral. Is there ever a legitimate medical reason to sterilize? I know that both procedures have bad side effects:
http://www.dontfixit.org/
http://www.tubal.org/

my Mother my Confidence,
Corinne

Jarrod_D

  • Member
  • Posts: 787
Is sterilization ever medically necessary?
« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2005, 08:37:am »

Not sure about the procedures listed above, but I know there are certain medical procedures that indirectly cause sterilization.  The removal of cervical or testicular Cancer for instance.

 

Jarrod


Montreal_Marisa

  • Member
  • Posts: 730
Is sterilization ever medically necessary?
« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2005, 08:43:am »
Of course there are moral and acceptable reasons to be  sterilized.  A woman who can not ever be pregnant or give birth  because of severe health problems, ie heart problems.  There are  many, many women who have had to have their uterus removed due to  medical problems, thus sterilized.  I believe the Catholic Church  accepts sterilization in grave circumstances.  If I'm wrong,  someone please correct me. 
 

MarysChild

  • Guest
Is sterilization ever medically necessary?
« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2005, 12:29:pm »
My Mom had to have a hysterectomy (pretty sure that means uterus removed) because she had something wrong with them. I know it wasn't for birth control reasons, though, because Dad got a vasectomy after my youngest brother was born. If I remember correctly, she went right into menopause. I guess I should have remembered that to answer my question.

my Mother my Confidence,
Corinne

tradcatholicmom

  • Guest
Is sterilization ever medically necessary?
« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2005, 02:36:pm »

Quote from: Montreal_Marisa
Of course there are moral and acceptable reasons to be sterilized.  A woman who can not ever be pregnant or give birth because of severe health problems, ie heart problems.  There are many, many women who have had to have their uterus removed due to medical problems, thus sterilized.  I believe the Catholic Church accepts sterilization in grave circumstances.  If I'm wrong, someone please correct me. 

 

Sterlization for those reasons, no matter how grave the reason to never get pregnant again would still be artifical birth control and thus a mortal sin. 

We're never allowed to do evil to prevent evil.

 

 

"54. But no reason, however grave, may be put forward by which anything intrinsically against nature may become conformable to nature and morally good. Since, therefore, the conjugal act is destined primarily by nature for the begetting of children, those who in exercising it deliberately frustrate its natural power and purpose sin against nature and commit a deed which is shameful and intrinsically vicious. "- Casti Connbui

 

A couple in this circumstance would be called to total abstinence or strict NFP.  Once you allow artifical birth control (which is all sterlization is) for this reason, you're on a slippery slope.

 

Now indirect sterlization; hysterectomy, the removal of the tube for a tubal pregnancy, that kind of thing; that is allowed.



JuxtaCrucem

  • Guest
Is sterilization ever medically necessary?
« Reply #5 on: July 29, 2005, 08:00:pm »

Quote from: Montreal_Marisa
Of course there are moral and acceptable reasons to be sterilized.  A woman who can not ever be pregnant or give birth because of severe health problems, ie heart problems.  There are many, many women who have had to have their uterus removed due to medical problems, thus sterilized.  I believe the Catholic Church accepts sterilization in grave circumstances.  If I'm wrong, someone please correct me. 

It is the question of 'double effect'.  We may never do evil that 'good' may come from it.  A woman or a man may never be sterilized as a means to avoid procreating, regardless of the health problems.  They may use periodic abstinence or complete abstinence but only with the permission of a knowledgeable confessor.

 

An example of 'double effect' in the question of hysterectomy is that the first reason to have the surgery is due directly to an immediate health problem: cancer, etc.  The secondary, unintended effect, is sterilization.

 

Juxta Crucem!