FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums

Full Version: Luke 18:19
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Greetings, [Image: hellosmiley.gif]

Why does Jesus Christ appear to deny His divinity in Luke 18:19?
Quote:And Jesus said to him: Why dost thou call me good? None is good but God alone.

GrumpyTroll Wrote:Why does Jesus Christ appear to deny His divinity in Luke 18:19?
Quote:And Jesus said to him: Why dost thou call me good? None is good but God alone.


He doesn't appear to deny His divinity--except by way of an unwarranted inference. Note the question that Our Lord is answering: "Good Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?" Why is the questioner asking Jesus about this? Who, other than God, would be sure to give the right answer to that question? Who else could be good enough, in wisdom and love and power?

Our Lord is not being asked whether He is God, and giving (or even suggesting) a negative answer. He is demanding that the questioner think about the implication of his own question--as if He were to say, "Why do you ask? Do you think I'm God?" If anyone else said that, the question would be rhetorical and the answer would obviously be "no." The shock of awareness, I think, was supposed to come when the questioner realized that the answer was not obviously "no"--that it might even be "yes"--that God Himself could be standing before him in the flesh, and making him think about whether the answer was "yes" indeed.

Who is this, who commands the winds and waves, and they obey him? Who is this, who even claims to forgive sins? Who is this, who can be trusted to lead the way to eternal life? There's only one right answer--but He demands that we think about the answer.

Blessings,

Don McMaster
Thank you very much for your clear answer. [Image: tiphat2.gif]