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What is the best psalter translated into English? I am acquainted with the Douay-Rheims psalms, the Pius XII psalter in English from "My Daily Psalms," and the psalms which are included in the Pius X Office of Our Lady. I don't know which psalms breviary.net uses.

I suppose I'm concerned with beauty of language, fidelity to the meaning, and liturgical use.
charlesh Wrote:I suppose I'm concerned with beauty of language, fidelity to the meaning, and liturgical use.

You might try Saint Dunstan's Plainsong Psalter. It uses the Coverdale psalter, which, in comparison to the Psalter used at breviary.net seems very close. As to fidelity to the meaning, I can't really comment, but the Coverdale psalter has been the standard in Anglican liturgical use--until 1979 in the US that is. It is, unfortuantely, a Protestant translation, but has been praised for its use of the English language by Roman Catholics and Orthodox alike.

The Coverdale psalter is used in the Anglican Breviary, which some priests from the Confraternity of Ss. Peter and Paul (breviary.net) have said is an acceptable form of the Divine Office.
To correct myself, from the Anglican Breviary website:

certain priests of the Roman Catholic Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter have recommended the Anglican Breviary to their laity as an acceptable form of the Divine Office.

Doesn't the Anglican Breviary use the King James psalter?
Paul Wrote:Doesn't the Anglican Breviary use the King James psalter?

No, it uses the Coverdale Psalter, but the scripture readings are King James. Why they decided to use the KJV instead of the Douay-Rheims, I don't know, seing as how, when compared with the scripture readings from breviary.net, most of them are almost word-for-word the same. There are instances in the KJV and the D-R where verses are verbatim.

I suspect that because the Anglican Breviary project was organized by Anglo-Catholics, they preferred to use the KJV for the scripture readings because it was the unofficial standard of the Anglican Comminion at the time. The Coverdale Psalter was also the standard for liturgical use of the psalter in the Anglican Communion at the time, being used in the English and American Book of Common Prayer, hence their choice to use it for the Breviary. But the English of the AB is such that it is preferable to other translations of the old Roman Breviary, and if FSSP recommends it to their laity, it is good enough for me.
Breviary.net doesn't use the Douay. They may have used the Anglican Breviary (with its King James readings), or they may have used the Marquess of Bute translation, since I've looked at that, and the Lessons of the II and III Nocturns are the same. I'm not entirely sure which English translation they use, but I know it's not the Douay.
Perhaps breviary.net uses a direct translation from the Latin?
Traditionalist Wrote:Perhaps breviary.net uses a direct translation from the Latin?

It doesn't.