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Are y'all doing anything special this year in terms of food? Is anyone rebelling against the traditional triad of turkey, mashed potatoes, and pumpkin pie?

If anyone could help me out, I'm looking for a new way to make pumpkin pie. I also want a really good recipe for stuffed squash.
This year an (extended) family dinner doesn't seem likely. We'll probably have Thanksgiving dinner at the parish hall.

One of my favorite recipes is pecan pie, but I don't have it on hand. I'll post it when I get home.
Satori Wrote:Are y'all doing anything special this year in terms of food? Is anyone rebelling against the traditional triad of turkey, mashed potatoes, and pumpkin pie?
I'm a vegan and my mother puts dairy products in the mashed potatoes, so yes.

I tend to eat a lot of vegetables. I recommend sweet pototoes or yams especially.

Quote:If anyone could help me out, I'm looking for a new way to make pumpkin pie. I also want a really good recipe for stuffed squash.
My mother makes the best. I'll try to swipe the recipe for you (later).
LaRoza Wrote:
Satori Wrote:Are y'all doing anything special this year in terms of food? Is anyone rebelling against the traditional triad of turkey, mashed potatoes, and pumpkin pie?
I'm a vegan and my mother puts dairy products in the mashed potatoes, so yes.

I tend to eat a lot of vegetables. I recommend sweet pototoes or yams especially.

Quote:If anyone could help me out, I'm looking for a new way to make pumpkin pie. I also want a really good recipe for stuffed squash.
My mother makes the best. I'll try to swipe the recipe for you (later).

LaRoza, the best Thanksgiving dinner I ever had was vegan. And although I am a passionate, incurable meat-eater, I actually enjoy Tofurkey.
Satori Wrote:I actually enjoy Tofurkey.

I'm telling Marty.  He's gonna be pissed.  ;)

IMHO, Thanksgiving is just one day that isn't to be disturbed.  Call me a traditionalist or whatever, but the day is a celebration of poultry and carbohydrates, the recipes do not change.

I always thought that the cheffy people, food network and the nouveaux gourmands miss the point when they try to chef-up Thanksgiving.  Get a good 50-year-old cookbook and use those recipes.

Further, I am unimpressed by people who feel the need to create elaborate leftover-turkey recipes like turkey soup, turkey burritos, turkey ice cream or whatever.  There is enough integrity to the bird to let her stand as is with two pieces of bread, some thick brown-sugary barbeque sauce and a slice of swiss cheese that is a greater tribute to Black-Friday-lunch than any turkey-topped-Tombstone-pizza will ever be.

That said, my mother-in-law makes a pumpkin-pie alternative that is better than a pumpkin pie.  It is essentially yellow cake mix with canned pumpkin filling layered on top.  Cover with chopped walnuts, bake until baked, serve warm.  Yum.

My wife volunteered to bring a side-dish to her folks' dinner this year.  After pouring through cookbooks, recipe cards, the internets, newspaper, magazines and asking around for advice, she looked at me and said "What goes into green-bean casserole?"  That's my girl! 

You don't mess with what works.  :)
WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote:IMHO, Thanksgiving is just one day that isn't to be disturbed.  Call me a traditionalist or whatever, but the day is a celebration of poultry and carbohydrates, the recipes do not change.

I agree. Every year we try new things BUT if it deviates too far from the traditional we get grumpy and say over and over again, "Its not as good as the regular."


Quote:I always thought that the cheffy people, food network and the nouveaux gourmands miss the point when they try to chef-up Thanksgiving.  Get a good 50-year-old cookbook and use those recipes.

Yup. I use my southern grandmother's handwritten hand-me-down recipes for most things. But as far as food network goes, Paula Deen and Ina Garten do good things with thanksgiving. Rachael Ray can bite me.

Quote:Further, I am unimpressed by people who feel the need to create elaborate leftover-turkey recipes like turkey soup, turkey burritos, turkey ice cream or whatever.  There is enough integrity to the bird to let her stand as is with two pieces of bread, some thick brown-sugary barbeque sauce and a slice of swiss cheese that is a greater tribute to Black-Friday-lunch than any turkey-topped-Tombstone-pizza will ever be.

I make thanksgiving sandwiches. Stuffing, turkey, cranberries, mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes, gravy....all goes into the sandwich. Some people get nauseated by the sight of it. Others give me high fives.

Though one year we had A LOT of turkey left over and made turkey-taquitos for dinner. One of the best things I have ever eaten. :smile:

Quote:That said, my mother-in-law makes a pumpkin-pie alternative that is better than a pumpkin pie.  It is essentially yellow cake mix with canned pumpkin filling layered on top.  Cover with chopped walnuts, bake until baked, serve warm.  Yum.

Paula Deen makes something similar. It looks really good. But we've learned over the years that if we don't have regular pumpkin pie, somebody gets reduced to tears. So we stick with the original.

BTW - I make the best pecan pie. I'm not being prideful. I'm just stating facts. I'm a legend in the pecan pie world. Ships have been sunk, and wars fought for my pecan pie. I'm a master now that I found the best pie crust recipe in the world. Unfortunately, it doesn't make the prettiest crusts (lots of shrinkage on the edges, so any fancy designs get distorted a bit) but I'm looking into ways to prevent that.

Quote:My wife volunteered to bring a side-dish to her folks' dinner this year.  After pouring through cookbooks, recipe cards, the internets, newspaper, magazines and asking around for advice, she looked at me and said "What goes into green-bean casserole?"  That's my girl! 

You don't mess with what works.  :)

Look up Paula Deen's recipe. I make that every year and everyone raves about it - I make a double batch and it is the only thing we run out of. Its just a classic recipe with nothing weird in it - still canned cream of mushroom soup and french's french fried onions. But there is something magical about it.
Satori Wrote:
LaRoza Wrote:
Satori Wrote:Are y'all doing anything special this year in terms of food? Is anyone rebelling against the traditional triad of turkey, mashed potatoes, and pumpkin pie?
I'm a vegan and my mother puts dairy products in the mashed potatoes, so yes.

I tend to eat a lot of vegetables. I recommend sweet pototoes or yams especially.

Quote:If anyone could help me out, I'm looking for a new way to make pumpkin pie. I also want a really good recipe for stuffed squash.
My mother makes the best. I'll try to swipe the recipe for you (later).

LaRoza, the best Thanksgiving dinner I ever had was vegan. And although I am a passionate, incurable meat-eater, I actually enjoy Tofurkey.

One of the best pumpkin pies I've had is a vegan one made with coconut milk.

I don't have any unusual pie recipes for you, though. Over the years, they've been ousted from my cookbooks by popular demand. :(

So we're trad in more ways than one, eh?

Well, I agree with you. If it ain't broke, don't fix it. However, there are a plethora of good autumnal recipes out there, and my family is small, so I try to do a couple of different side dishes each year. I don't stray too much from the basics. Some years I make slightly sweet yeast rolls, other years some kind of yummy cornbread. Some years mashed white potatoes, some years mashed sweet potatoes. Some years corn pudding, some years succotash.

As for pumpkin pie, I'm not all that crazy about it as it's usually prepared, but I'm making it for my mother, who will be sad if she doesn't get a piece. It seems as though pumpkin pie should be good, but usually it's just blah. I'm convinced there must be some ingredient that would make it wowee, some kind of crust that must complement that mushy-sweetened-squash filling perfectly, and I'm hoping one of the fabu cooks around here will tell me what it is. Coconut milk? I love it. Lemme have it.

Last year I went to Thanksgiving dinner at the in-laws. Not only did they serve ham biscuits instead of turkey, when it came time for dessert, my MIL nonchalantly pulled a pumpkin pie out of the 'fridge, still in its grocery store box. When I hesitantly broached the subject of whipped cream, she vaguely suggested that there MIGHT be a container of whipped topping in the freezer. Probably low-fat and sugar-free. This, together with cold grocery store pie, is right up there with clown Masses in my book. Decided then and there that I would invite HER to dinner next year. If you can't beat 'em, feed 'em.

As good as that pumpkin pie/cake sounds, I think I'll save it for another time. At Thanksgiving, there must be crust. Must must.

Paloma, please please please PM me about crusts. I'm on a quest to make crusts that are both delicious and reasonably pretty; let's swap tricks.
I don't make green bean casserole. Is that rebellious enough? Dh's opinion of it can't be shared on a Catholic forum. :D Best recipe for it I ever saw was a Cook's Illustrated one. I think I have it around here somewhere. It was real mushrooms and a white sauce with fried onions, if I remember correctly.

I am making a pumpkin cheesecake with a gingersnap crust. The recipe is at allrecipes.com.
 I'm also making the trad pumpkin pie and an apple pie. I was going to make pecan too but dh said it was pie overkill.


P.S. Check the back of your fried onion can. French's first ingredient is oil. Other brands, like store brands, often have onion as the first ingredient.

Satori, I just got this recipe in my Thanksgiving issue of Better Homes and Gardens...it's a twist on the Pumpkin Pie that sounds divine. :)
 
Pumpkin Chocolate Cheesecake Pie
  • 1  recipe Deep Dish Pie Pastry, below
  • 12  oz. cream cheese, softened (1-1/2 8-oz. pkgs.)
  • 1/4  cup granulated sugar
  • 1  egg, lightly beaten
  • 3/4  cup finely chopped semisweet chocolate or miniature chocolate pieces
  • 1  15-oz. can pumpkin
  • 2/3  cup packed brown sugar
  • 2  tsp. pumpkin pie spice
  • 4  eggs, lightly beaten
  • 3/4  cup half-and-half or light cream
  •   Chopped chocolate (optional)
Directions

1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees F. Prepare and roll out Deep Dish Pie Pastry. Transfer pastry to a 9-1/2- to 10-inch deep-dish pie plate. Trim crust edge 1/2-inch beyond pie plate. Flute edge high. Line pastry with double thickness of foil. Bake 8 minutes. Remove foil; bake 6 minutes more or until golden. Cool on wire rack. Reduce oven temperature to 375 degrees F.

2. In medium mixing bowl combine cream cheese, 1/4 cup sugar, and 1 egg; beat on low speed until smooth. Spread cream cheese mixture in cooled pastry shell. Sprinkle with chopped chocolate.

3. In bowl combine pumpkin, brown sugar, and spice. Stir in 4 eggs. Gradually stir in half-and-half. Slowly pour pumpkin mixture on chocolate layer. To prevent overbrowning, cover pie edge with foil.

4. Bake 60 to 65 minutes or until knife inserted near center comes out clean. Remove foil. Cool on wire rack. Cover and refrigerate within 2 hour. Top with chopped chocolate.

Deep Dish Pie Pastry:In medium bowl, stir together 1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Using pastry blender or two knives cut in 6 tablespoons shortening until pieces are pea-size. Sprinkle 1 tablespoon cold water over part of flour mixture; gently toss with fork. Push moistened dough to side of bowl. Repeat, using 1 tablespoon water at a time, until all flour is moistened (5 to 6 tablespoons total). Form into ball. On lightly floured surface, flatten dough. Roll pastry from center to edge into 13-inch circle. Serves 8.

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