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I was thinking based on the reaction of some people to a certain poster (who we all know, no need to give names :)) who often posts devotions or teachings of saints and advocates private devotions and practices that are not violating the Church, but also not dogmatic or binding, it might be good to have a thread on people's views on such practices.

Obviously, we should not hold others to personal devotions and the Church is for all, however, does this mean we should be restricted in expressing our devotions especially when done in an anonymous way?

I do find people holding others to their devotions to be wrong, like someone saying that all women should dress a certain way which is not required by the Church, and I'm sure others would be equally disturbed if I held others to my personal practices within the Church, but I do not think we should be critical of those who have private devotions and be thankful of being informed of private devotions so we may be able to use them or not use them as needed.
I think Luigi's insights are very edifying and helpful. They help us to aim higher in our spiritual lives and to look away from the mundane things for a while.

I must commend him on his posts. They are a very positive contribution to this forum.

The Father said this to St. Catherine of Siena in the Dialogue in regards to souls united to Him by devotion and love:

"Such a man rejoices in everything, nor does he make himself judge of My servants, or of any rational creature, but rejoices in every condition and in every manner of holiness which he sees, saying: 'Thanks be to You, Eternal Father, who have in Your House many mansions.' And he rejoices more in the different ways of holiness which he sees, than if he were to see all traveling by one road, because, in this way, he perceives the greatness of My Goodness become more manifest, and thus, rejoicing, draws from all the fragrance of the rose."

I think that's a good attitude to use--if someone makes a post showing a different road to holiness than others take, we should rejoice in the goodness of God [Image: smile.gif].

I used to find Luigi's posts odd, and not tremendously useful.

Of course, I think differently now, and think his posts are a great treasure.

His website also contains a wealth of information.

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Oh, I also think the practices are good.

I've tried to see what's wrong with Luigi's posts, simply because so many do, but I haven't found anything wrong in them because they are simply quotes of people probably in Heaven. Yes they implicitly say something about Luigi's private devotions, but isn't that a large part of what we should each be offering in a forum for Catholics? I think there's been a "band-wagon" mentality going on in this site against the guy called "Luigi" who cuts and pastes these quotes, and the band-wagon mentality reflects badly on those who join it. So you don't like what St such-and-such says? Fine, but don't shoot the messenger. Of course, I could follow Luigi's chosen path and say what I think better by quoting someone else, but I believe that there's also a place for personal, fallen-human contributions in a forum. [Image: tiphat2.gif]
Benno Wrote:I've tried to see what's wrong with Luigi's posts, simply because so many do, but I haven't found anything wrong in them because they are simply quotes of people probably in Heaven.

1) It's annoying to click on a thread, thinking it's going to be of some use, only to find yet another blog link. If Luigi wants to post this stuff so much, and I'm sure someone does find it useful, then he would do better to have just one thread with all his links, and the subsequent discussion it produces,

2) As far as I've observed Luigi has only take quotes from religious, men striving for a higher state of perfection. There may be some truth in what is posted, but the average Christian is not called to the type of life Luigi references.
Just yesterday or the day before there was posted a thread about ladies hair being the snares that drag men to hell. This is just crazy stuff. Wasn't it Mary Magdalene whose hair was long enough to wash Christ's feet?

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Quote:As far as I've observed Luigi has only take quotes from religious, men striving for a higher state of perfection. There may be some truth in what is posted, but the average Christian is not called to the type of life Luigi references

But that's the thing: we are called to sainthood through our baptism; we should be striving fo perfection according to our state of life.

I think that people who are very pious may seem odd or alienating to outsiders (all the saints seems to have some period of being ostracized or condemned) but why is that?  I think it's because we value our diversions and pleasure more than following God.

I find his posts very helpful and orthodox. 
We can achieve spiritual perfection while being perfectly happy. We don't have to be gloomy and over scrupulous. 

The devil will say: Why be a saint? Why be a killjoy? Eat, drink and be merry.

The devil will also say: IF you eat, drink and be merry, you are going to hell.
Why can't we see the lie in both of these? Why can't we see the trap? Moderation is not complacency. TEMPERANCE is one of the fruits of the Holy Spirit. So is JOY. We need to remember that.

- Lisa 
I'm posting part of my answer on another thread that didn't go over too well. Edited for this thread: Hopefully it will make sense here...
 
The path to spiritual perfection is not the same for every individual. We are uniquely made, with our own natural (and morally neutral) strengths and weaknesses. For some people, reading the Bible for 20 minutes every day would be more spiritually beneficial than fasting on bread and water. Hellfire sermons might help some people achieve sanctity, but a steady diet of them might crush the spirit of others. Wearing a hair shirt might make some people soar to sainthood, but for others it will only give them an itch.
 Further, your "hair shirt" could be the person sitting next to you. It could be a cranky husband, wife, parent, or child, that you have to put up with everyday. It could be a lousy boss or an unforgiving friend. Growing in love of God and neighbor is often a lot harder than physical discomfort. Then again, the saints aren't saints for nothing. Their advice is trustworthy, when taken in proper context. Whatever path brings you the closest to Christ - with spiritual guidance - is the path you should take.  - Lisa