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Something cheerful (may these priests become traditional ones and offer all the Sacraments in the traditional way, encourage traditional popular devotions, and present Catholic teaching in a manner consistent with that which was taught before Vatican II -- but without the Americanist, "Puritany" stuff that befouled the expression of the Faith here in the US thanks to Calvinism and French > Irish Jansenism). From BBC News:



Catholic Priest Numbers Increase

The number of priests in the Catholic Church around the world is slowly rising, the Vatican says. The Holy See presented a statistical yearbook to Pope Benedict XVI, showing an increase of several hundred priests a year since 2000. Thanks to large increases in Africa and Asia, the number of Catholic priests rose from 405,178 in 2000 to 408,024 in 2007, the report said. In the previous two decades, the number of priests dropped markedly.
 
Stable congregation
Numbers in Africa had risen by 27.6% and in Asia by 21%, the report said. The figures were "a continuing trend of moderate growth in the number of priests in the world which began in 2000 after over two decades of disappointing results", it added. The percentage of Catholics worldwide remains stable, at about 17.3% of the global population, the report found. Some 1.147 billion people around the world identified themselves as Catholic, it said. Worldwide, the number of candidates for the priesthood increased by just under half a percentage point, despite small declines in figures for Europe and North and South America. The Catholic Church has recently been rocked by several scandals involving sexual abuse carried out by priests, which has prompted a crackdown on standards for potential priests.

VoxClamantis Wrote:increase of several hundred priests a year since 2000.

We can't have this! Not good news. This would undermine that doom and gloom, sky is falling, Church-is-going-to-hell-in-a-hand-basket mentality that some trads seem to love.
Credo Wrote:
VoxClamantis Wrote:increase of several hundred priests a year since 2000.

We can't have this! Not good news. This would undermine that doom and gloom, sky is falling, Church-is-going-to-hell-in-a-hand-basket mentality that some trads seem to love.


and then you'd have to find something else to be snarky about!  :)

That's great news for Africa and Asia.  Let me know when it arrives on the shores of the New World, though, would you?
I wonder:
  • Is the increase in priests/seminarians owing (as we see with women religious) owing to steady growth of rigorously traditional orders?
  • How many of these men will discover a calling to minister to the under-served Traditional community?
I so earnestly pray that it won't be just another generation of "social workers with collars", which is what we seem to have now.

Of the about 2 dozen seminarians of our Diocese, all but one are African, Colombian, or Vietnamese.  There's nothing wrong with that, until you remember that in Massachusetts ridiculously high numbers of people are of Irish or Italian descent.....where are they all?????
Well, there is definitely an increase in my diocese of young men going into the priesthood.  Just about everyone of my Catholic friends has either joined or almost joined seminary.  It's not something out of the norm anymore.  It seems to be something that every Catholic guy seriously contemplates.
Ireland used to export Priests all over the world now it looks like it will be Africa and Asia doing so. As long as their Orthodox and willing to say the latin Mass great.
While the number of Seminarians seems stabilized in North America (although Wisconsin has always had a high number) the numbers attending Traditional seminaries (SSPX, FSSP, ICRSS, etc.) has increased while the numbers attending liberal seminaries has decreased. For typical conservative seminaries I don't know what the change has been in the US but I believe it has remained stable.
There is decent anecdotal evidence that the seminarians in the diocesean, Novus Ordo seminaries are much more tradition-friendly than the priests teaching the classes.  We're not out of the woods in America yet, but I think there's decent reason to be optimistic. 
More anecdotal evidence: the TLM I attend usually have five or six young men in attendance who look to me like seminary candidates.  At least, that's what I pray for when I see them.  In contrast, at the NO Mass there doesn't appear to be any potential priests.
My only issue with importing priests is that it often {for me at least} is hard to understand accents, and I have had issues with priests from Africa & Asia with this in particular.

Not an issue with Mass so much as with confession & other things - it's hard when you can't understand what the priest is asking.

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