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The following came up on another forum:

another forum Wrote:Why isn't more popular devotion/attention given to the great figures of the Old Testament such as Abraham? Abraham is our father in faith...and ironically, his spiritual fatherhood of all Christians is much more explicitly taugh in Scripture than Our Blessed Lady's spiritual motherhood of all Christians.

Thoughts?

Most Christians seem to never reference Prophet Abraham in their conversations, or any of the prophets for that matter. Why do you think this is?
Credo Wrote:The following came up on another forum:

another forum Wrote:Why isn't more popular devotion/attention given to the great figures of the Old Testament such as Abraham? Abraham is our father in faith...and ironically, his spiritual fatherhood of all Christians is much more explicitly taugh in Scripture than Our Blessed Lady's spiritual motherhood of all Christians.

Thoughts?

Most Christians seem to never reference Prophet Abraham in their conversations, or any of the prophets for that matter. Why do you think this is?
Seems to me to be a western Christian thing. In the Eastern Churches they "pay more attention" to the OT Prophets. I was in a Byzantine Church once that had a huge Icon of Elijah.
I think this is generally true about Latin-rite Catholicism. Still, we have a tradition of great Hebraists as well as the best conceptual framework for the spiritual reading of the Old Testament in unity with the New, and Old Testament figures do feature quite prominently in Catholic art.

There is a certain danger of going overboard with the Old Testament stuff, and I think this is particularly visible in certain strands of Protestantism, especially in America. The attention given to the prophets lends itself to a certain sort of rugged individualism, a hostility towards institution, coming from the rebukes of Israel on the mouths of the vessels of divine wrath. One need only to stroll through an old cemetery in America's heartland to see the reminders, names like Sarah, Jedediah, Zephaniah, Ezekiel. Women in bonnets, men dressed simply, plain prayers sending them into the virgin soil, where only Indians had foraged through the centuries.

Much of what was good in America was built on this everyday, earthy spirituality, but it was an impoverished one. I can't help but feel a certain affection for those good, simple people and think they were as worthy of a republic as the old Romans.
They are mentioned sometimes.
I personally do use them in my devotions to help me live me life (especially Samson, who was a Judge).

They used to be mentioned more before...
Cyriacus Wrote:There is a certain danger of going overboard with the Old Testament stuff

True.

In a few weeks many Catholic parishes will be joining Seder services, or holding their own. This is a little too much (though knowing about the Seder definitely helps one understand the Mass).

However, a better incorporation of the Prophets in the spiritual lives of Christians will help the believer understand his Faith better.
If you look at old Medieval Cathedrals they are FILLED with Old Testament prophets and kings; maybe even more than the saints.

Perhaps our 'neglect' in this area is a result of watered down American Catholicism which has existed since its beginnings, centuries before Vatican II. We have just never experienced the entirety of the richness of the Faith as the Europeans did.
I don't think it has anything to do with "America" or "Europe", but time. The Old Testament is finite and over. If we take all the people worthy of remembrance in the Old Testament, they may number less than the saints from a single era. 
But their importance doesn't diminish over time. Many NT saints get forgotten because new one are being added al the time. The Old stay the same. If they were celebrated more often in earlier parts of the Church, than why not now?
Why not now? No one is saying they shouldn't be. They aren't forgotten.
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