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Full Version: Cleveland: 52 parishes to close
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[Image: large_St%20Colmad.jpg]

http://www.cleveland.com/living/index.ss...eland.html


Quote:There were tears and cheers in Catholic churches throughout Greater Cleveland on Saturday as the faithful learned for the first time whether their parishes will fit in -- or not -- in a new, smaller version of the Cleveland Catholic Diocese.
At Sacred Heart of Jesus in Slavic Village, parishioners shouted, "My God! Why?" when they heard their church was closing.
At St. Stephen on West 54th Street in Cleveland, there was a burst of applause and a shout of "Hallelujah" at the news it would stay open.

...
Shutting down Colman and Ignatius means the darkening of two brilliantly lighted West Side steeples, both of which are prominent landmarks reaching into the city's skyline.
In a letter to parishioners and friends of St. Colman, the Rev. Bob Begin argued that the closing would sever a lifeline to poor people who rely on Colman's neighborhood outreach ministry.
The letter asks people to fill out an accompanying form to appeal Lennon's decision.
"The suburbs are isolated from the poor," said Colman parishioner Carole Romansky of Berea, noting how inner-city neighborhoods took the biggest hits in the downsizing. "Would Jesus have stayed in the suburbs?"
The downsizing, said to be the first in the history of the 162-year-old diocese, is due to a shortage of priests, changing demographics and wanting collection baskets, the bishop has said.
"We're just too big for the number of people that we have," Lennon said in a recent interview, noting that the number of practicing Catholics in the diocese dwindled from 1 million 50 years ago to less than 800,000 today.
This weekend's announcements culminate two years of tedious meetings and wild speculations on which of the diocese's churches should be sacrificed and which should live.
Many old ethnic parishes were on the list of casualties.
Parishioners at St. Barbara, a historically Polish parish in Cleveland, reacted with sadness and anger to news of the church's demise.
"My grandfather built it, my mother helped to sustain it, and I guess I'm going to bury it," said Christine Dziedzina of Old Brooklyn.
Sad. While I realize this priest is correct:
Quote:"This building is a beautiful building. A magnificent building," he said. "But the bottom line is, it isn't the church. We are."

It's still a terrible loss, especially considering most suburban churches.

"We have entered a new springtime in a sense a new Pentecost" JPII the ecumaniac.
Baskerville Wrote:"We have entered a new springtime in a sense a new Pentecost" JPII the ecumaniac.


Yeah, but that's not the whole story.  Cleveland has gone from a population of almost a million in 1950 to about 400,000 now.  There are ethnic churches in the city that are within easy walking distance (and sometimes even in sight of) other Catholic parishes.  Still, the sheer number of closings is distressing, and some of these decisions may be revisited.  I hope so.  Some very impressive and prominent buildings are on the list.

Of the four parishes that regularly offer the traditional Mass, only one (St. Mary's in Akron) is scheduled to be closed.


Closing the Parishes is bad news but it is the sign of the overall decline.

http://dioceseofcleveland.org/vibrantpar...erview.pdf

In 1970 there were 600 active priests in the diocese, now 366 active and 95 retired priests. By my view Cleavland in better of than other dioceses, in 2008 there were 5 ordinations (insted of the minimum required 10) but all 5 from the diocese or neighbour dioceses. In the Archdiocese of Chicago there were 12 ordinations all from outside of the US

laszlo

Rust belt cities like Cleavland have been in a state of decline for years.  It's amazing that they were able to keep as many churches as they did open for so long.  Most of the young people in the rust belt areas of PA OH have moved out to the burbs or the Sunbelt.   The older generation that kept a lot of these parishes going for so long are just getting too old to do so any more.  It kills me to think of these historic old churches being destroyed or turned into sectarian "churches" or condo's.  The only parishes to be kept open are the more liberal suburban ones.

On a side note, are their any dioceses that have not chosen to have massive church closings?  Probably ones like Brooklyn NY were they have plenty of new immigrant groups to replace the ones that move out of these types of parishes.

Bob

Also, please tell me that no Italian parishes were closed in Cleavland?
Robb Wrote: 
The only parishes to be kept open are the more liberal suburban ones.

Actually, some pretty liberal city parishes are closing, including one (St. Colman's) that was quite a surprise, and another that used to house "Futurechurch".  On the other hand, St. Stephen's, a city parish that tends to be more conservative and has a traditional Mass on Sunday, is staying open, contrary to the cluster committee's recommendation.

There is an appeal process, and I hope that more parishes are able to stay open.

Quote:Also, please tell me that no Italian parishes were closed in Cleavland?


No Italian parishes are closing. 
The real tragedy of these church closings is not so much losing buildings since buildings have come and gone over the centuries.  Someday these suburban monstrosities of the past 50 years will cease to function as Catholic churches, hopefully to be replaced by truly worthy, majestic edifices.  No, the real tragedy is these buildings being re-used for profane purposes or even taken over by heretics.

If I was a bishop, I'd order everything in a closed church to be removed, including stained-glass windows, altars, pews, everything.  Then I'd demolish the building and sell the land.  Then there'd be no worries about a former Catholic church being used for pagan/apostate/heretical/satanic/profane purposes. I understand there's a bar out east somewhere that used to be a Catholic church and was closed and sold off.  Unfortunately, they left almost everything intact including stained glass windows.  They've got liquor bottles lined up on the old High Altar and even installed a couple of kegs in front. I like booze as much as the next guy, but even I find this revolting.  Demolish the building and you avoid the possibility of such scandals.
As more parishes continue to close nationwide the more the U.S. conitnues to slide ethically and morally as well as implode economically.....


Coincidence?
DrBombay Wrote:The real tragedy of these church closings is not so much losing buildings since buildings have come and gone over the centuries.  Someday these suburban monstrosities of the past 50 years will cease to function as Catholic churches, hopefully to be replaced by truly worthy, majestic edifices.  No, the real tragedy is these buildings being re-used for profane purposes or even taken over by heretics.

If I was a bishop, I'd order everything in a closed church to be removed, including stained-glass windows, altars, pews, everything.  Then I'd demolish the building and sell the land.  Then there'd be no worries about a former Catholic church being used for pagan/apostate/heretical/satanic/profane purposes. I understand there's a bar out east somewhere that used to be a Catholic church and was closed and sold off.  Unfortunately, they left almost everything intact including stained glass windows.  They've got liquor bottles lined up on the old High Altar and even installed a couple of kegs in front. I like booze as much as the next guy, but even I find this revolting.  Demolish the building and you avoid the possibility of such scandals.


Sort of a scorched earth policy, eh Doc?

Not that I don't agree.
alaric Wrote:
DrBombay Wrote:The real tragedy of these church closings is not so much losing buildings since buildings have come and gone over the centuries.  Someday these suburban monstrosities of the past 50 years will cease to function as Catholic churches, hopefully to be replaced by truly worthy, majestic edifices.  No, the real tragedy is these buildings being re-used for profane purposes or even taken over by heretics.

If I was a bishop, I'd order everything in a closed church to be removed, including stained-glass windows, altars, pews, everything.  Then I'd demolish the building and sell the land.  Then there'd be no worries about a former Catholic church being used for pagan/apostate/heretical/satanic/profane purposes. I understand there's a bar out east somewhere that used to be a Catholic church and was closed and sold off.  Unfortunately, they left almost everything intact including stained glass windows.  They've got liquor bottles lined up on the old High Altar and even installed a couple of kegs in front. I like booze as much as the next guy, but even I find this revolting.  Demolish the building and you avoid the possibility of such scandals.


Sort of a scorched earth policy, eh Doc?

Not that I don't agree.

I'd also salt the earth before I sold the land, which would probably violate environmental laws of some type.  Heh.  Probably a little too Old Testament for most bishops nowadays, which is why I shall never wear the purple. 
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