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Do any of your chapels use a communion rail cloth?  They just started using one at my chapel.  Only a few people knew how to use it.

I've just never seen it before.  Anyone else?


what is it?
A cloth that hangs over the rail kinda like a tablecloth.

You put your hands under it so that if the Sacrament falls it lands on the cloth and you don't inadvertently touch it, but still could catch it and prevent it from hitting the floor.

The only place I've ever seen one is St. John Cantius in Chicago.
Pretty standard in most sspx chapels, although I have seen one or two without it. Very nice custom, it seems from old pictures and pictures in catechisms that is was fairly widespread.
If the Communion rail is made of metal or stone, the cloth is not used. If it's made or wood, then it is. It has to be with particles of the Sacrament getting embedded in the material if the Host falls on it. As least that's what I've been told.
Oh, wow.  There is a priest in York, PA who sets up a TLM in a chapel designed "in the round."  To designate a communion rail he covers the first row of chairs with a cloth very much like that.  Next time I visit my parents I'll know how to properly make use of it.  Thanks, WRC.
(04-17-2009, 12:03 PM)QuisUtDeus Wrote: [ -> ]The only place I've ever seen one is St. John Cantius in Chicago.

They have one at the ICK church and the SSPX church here too.
(04-17-2009, 12:41 PM)Credo Wrote: [ -> ]If the Communion rail is made of metal or stone, the cloth is not used. If it's made or wood, then it is. It has to be with particles of the Sacrament getting embedded in the material if the Host falls on it. As least that's what I've been told.

.... Ive never heard of that rule (although it makes sense), I doubt its a rule to be honest.

Every church here in Ireland (sspx) has stone rails(marble) and have cloths, and metal gates. (which also have cloths.)

Added to that the few chapels ive been to in the states all had marble rails with cloths, as well most of the chapels ive been to in France. I dont know about England, but in St.Saviours retreat house they have wooden rails and no cloths, in fact im sure ive seen that elsewhere also.

Its a custom as far as I know, not a rule.
(04-17-2009, 01:12 PM)tradmaverick Wrote: [ -> ]
(04-17-2009, 12:41 PM)Credo Wrote: [ -> ]If the Communion rail is made of metal or stone, the cloth is not used. If it's made or wood, then it is. It has to be with particles of the Sacrament getting embedded in the material if the Host falls on it. As least that's what I've been told.

.... Ive never heard of that rule (although it makes sense), I doubt its a rule to be honest.

Every church here in Ireland (sspx) has stone rails(marble) and have cloths, and metal gates. (which also have cloths.)

Added to that the few chapels ive been to in the states all had marble rails with cloths, as well most of the chapels ive been to in France. I dont know about England, but in St.Saviours retreat house they have wooden rails and no cloths, in fact im sure ive seen that elsewhere also.

Its a custom as far as I know, not a rule.

My understanding is they were required if a paten wasn't used, otherwise they are optional and have nothing to do with the material used in the rail.
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