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I am reading through old issues of The Point, a monthly published by Fr Feeney in the '50s.

In December of 1952, he remarked:

"We have had, lately, some disturbing reports on America’s Sisters, associating them with things foreign and hostile to them. Only after much investigation did we accept the report that Sisters who teach in our schools are now getting instructions on how to do it from nun-smearing professors at secular universities. Regretfully, we have read in recent public print the dissatisfaction of some of our nuns with their traditional clothing — how they hoped that they could be allowed berets instead of veils: how they would be pleased to look more like Red Cross nurses; how black was a depressing color, and long skirts an encumbrance. While a best-selling Catholic book is exploiting the cartoon potentialities of America’s nuns, the Catholic Press, ever anxious to prove that Catholics can meet Protestant standards of achievement, has taken to publicizing a hyphenated series of nun-poets, nun-chemists, nun-physicists and nun-jeep drivers."
It was a long time coming. Modernism had been around for decades. Pope St. Pius X had forced it underground for a time but it festered beneath the surface. What was so shocking was the rapidity in which it corrupted so many orders so quickly. The abandoning of the religious habit, that sign of consecration in the world, was just a symptom of what lay underneath.
There have been nun-poets, and great ones; St. Teresa of Avila, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz and Sister Mary Madeleva to name only a few. But the loss of the habit is indeed a sign of the loss of the religious spirit beneath it.... I think there's no sight more awesome than a nun in full habit or a priest in his cassock. Would that this sight was as common as it should be.
(04-18-2009, 02:37 PM)AgnusDei1989 Wrote: [ -> ]There have been nun-poets, and great ones; St. Teresa of Avila, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz and Sister Mary Madeleva to name only a few.

And there have been great priest-scientists: think of the Jesuits, and of Georges Lemaître. But I think that Fr Feeney was complaining about what he perceived as the nuns' engagement in such activities to meet not God, but "Protestant standards of achievement".
Yes, Fr. Feeney himself was a very successful poet.