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Full Version: So is Sanctifying Grace created or not created?
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(04-20-2009, 09:01 PM)GodFirst Wrote: [ -> ]???

I’m afraid I don’t understand the question. Could you please clarify what you mean by created?
Since sanctifying grace is that grace which confers on our souls a new life, that is, a sharing in the divine life of God Himself -  I'd say that sanctifying grace is uncreated; it's a part of the divine nature. 

- Lisa
(04-20-2009, 10:54 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: [ -> ]Since sanctifying grace is that grace which confers on our souls a new life, that is, a sharing in the divine life of God Himself -  I'd say that sanctifying grace is uncreated; it's a part of the divine nature. 

- Lisa

Assuming we understand the question right, I agree.
Sanctifying Grace is a created supernatural gift really distinct from God. (Sent. fidei proxima.)

[ . . . ] The Tridentine definition of Sanctifying Grace as "God's justice, not by means of which He is Himself just, but by which He makes us just" (D 799) excludes the identity of Sanctifying Grace with the Holy Ghost. [. . . ] The Holy Ghost is the mediator of the love of God, which is given to us in the justification, and is therefore distinguished from Sanctifying Grace, as the gift from the giver [Ludwig Ott, Fundamentals of Catholic Dogma, p. 254].

God bless you!

Don McMaster
Thanks McMaster! That was a hard question..

- Lisa
(04-21-2009, 07:02 AM)McMaster Wrote: [ -> ]Sanctifying Grace is a created supernatural gift really distinct from God. (Sent. fidei proxima.)

[ . . . ] The Tridentine definition of Sanctifying Grace as "God's justice, not by means of which He is Himself just, but by which He makes us just" (D 799) excludes the identity of Sanctifying Grace with the Holy Ghost. [. . . ] The Holy Ghost is the mediator of the love of God, which is given to us in the justification, and is therefore distinguished from Sanctifying Grace, as the gift from the giver [Ludwig Ott, Fundamentals of Catholic Dogma, p. 254].

God bless you!

Don McMaster
Are those word of Trent the only place it is said to be defined? Where is that first statement from and why did some of the Fathers (ususally of the East) teach that Sanctifying Grace was the (uncreated?) Divine Attributes? The history of this question confuses me because of the Eastern answer. Why and where do many of the Eastern schismatics get that it is uncreated?
This is a matter of semantics only.

Sanctifying Grace considered as our participation in Divine Life is clearly created, as we are a creature and our state of participation is clearly something initiated at a specific point in time. The Divine Life, in itself, is uncreated...for God. But for us, since we are created, it necessarily has a beginning or at least contingency to it.
But doesn't having sanctifying grace mean that the Holy Ghost is within us? In our catechism we learned - to repeat - that sanctifying grace is a sharing in the divine life of Christ Himself. "It is now no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me." (Gal 2:20).

???

- Lisa
(04-21-2009, 10:10 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: [ -> ]But doesn't having sanctifying grace mean that the Holy Ghost is within us? In our catechism we learned - to repeat - that sanctifying grace is a sharing in the divine life of Christ Himself. "It is now no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me." (Gal 2:20).

???

- Lisa

Don't quote me on this, but I think the way we can look at it is this: the Divine Life of God cannot be within us truly and utterly, as we are mere creatures. It is beyond the capacity of any creature to partake in the Divine Life fully - as this Life is infinite. Therefore, we can only have a participation of this life. Now this participation is in itself distinct from God and His Infinite Life - because this participation cannot be infinite.

Christ lives in us truly, but our participation of that life of God is limited by our nature as mere creatures; and it is this participation that constitutes sanctifying grace - distinct from God, though of course very much a bridge between the finite creature and the infinite God. 
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