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I was talking to a local priest today and he seems to be completely mystified that no one liked the bilingual Triduum and Easter liturgies that he recently presided over.  He doesn't understand what the "big deal" is.  When i suggested the wider use of Latin, he just shrugged.  None of this is especially noteworthy except he said that he had even gone so far as doing a web search to help him understand people' s objections.  I assured him that there was no lack of discussion on the subject; he assured me there was.  When I went to do my own research, I indeed found precious little.  Any help?
These people here might be able to give you some guidance: http://forums.catholic.com/

(Hat tip: Tiny http://catholicforum.fisheaters.com/inde...sg33062394)
Send him my way, I am some folks will straighten him out. I don't have a problem with people not speaking English, but my Spanish is awful.

Latin is (and always has been) the answer.
What two languages did he use?
The parish has a largish group of Hispanics, so in an effort to make everyone feel included, he chose to make half of everyone feel excluded. 
(04-23-2009, 10:10 PM)Penitent Wrote: [ -> ]I was talking to a local priest today and he seems to be completely mystified that no one liked the bilingual Triduum and Easter liturgies that he recently presided over.  He doesn't understand what the "big deal" is.  When i suggested the wider use of Latin, he just shrugged.  None of this is especially noteworthy except he said that he had even gone so far as doing a web search to help him understand people' s objections.  I assured him that there was no lack of discussion on the subject; he assured me there was.  When I went to do my own research, I indeed found precious little.  Any help?

Latin united...all the bi-lingual Masses divide...Prots do that, Baptist "church" south of my homse has 3 buildings side-side, one for English, Esapnol and Korean........divide the flock.........the NOland......
(04-24-2009, 10:50 AM)Belloc Wrote: [ -> ]
(04-23-2009, 10:10 PM)Penitent Wrote: [ -> ]I was talking to a local priest today and he seems to be completely mystified that no one liked the bilingual Triduum and Easter liturgies that he recently presided over.  He doesn't understand what the "big deal" is.  When i suggested the wider use of Latin, he just shrugged.  None of this is especially noteworthy except he said that he had even gone so far as doing a web search to help him understand people' s objections.  I assured him that there was no lack of discussion on the subject; he assured me there was.  When I went to do my own research, I indeed found precious little.  Any help?

Latin united...all the bi-lingual Masses divide...Prots do that, Baptist "church" south of my homse has 3 buildings side-side, one for English, Esapnol and Korean........divide the flock.........the NOland......

While for the most part this is true, the problem for many people comes in the form of if you strip the language (take your pick Italian,French,Spanish, Vietnamese,Tagalog, etc.) you also strip the extra ecclesial traditions people bring with them from the "Old Country". Sad to say this, but not every Priest is about preserving what people value as Catholics (outside of The Mass that is). The transition from Ethnic/Immigrant Parishes to Churches becoming shared public spaces between different nationalities has never been easy. Taking this into account, along with the introduction of The NO Mass in the vernacular it looked like an easier solution to a problem that had never been fully addressed. Instead of creating some form of dialog between groups, some parishes went with the "quick fix" of separate them all. Some people forget that historically in places with high concentrations of immigrants, The Masses were typically conducted in Latin AND the vernacular of the immigrant group (within Ethnic Parishes that is). Many parishes (at least in NYC) had upper and lower Churches to accommodate the various groups. Preservation of the traditions of the "Old Country" are noble indeed and should be encouraged (after all these are the traditions near and dear to many nations which have kept them Catholic, taking these away would be insulting the persons history), but it also takes a Priest who is wise, strong, willing and firm to handle the situation. Remember those who immigrate/d were/are still obligated to keep The Holy Days of Obligation of their country even after they left the "Old Country". That isn't saying these same people can't and won't get together for American Holy Days of Obligation (I would personally like to see the Feasts of First Nation Saints and Blesseds ( Blessed Kateri Tekakwitha, North American Martyrs , etc.) added to The Holy Days of Obligatin of The US. Not to mention this would mean a revival of a lot of the traditions from the various Missions  ;D , but that is thinking too far ahead.), but that the Church can serve as a bastion where they just aren't just another person. Where there traditions are valued and preserved in the appropriate manner. After all, we're not Protestants. Once The TLM is restored (may it be soon), I wonder how individual parishes will handle this often un addressed problem. People would be surprised at how many people have no problem with the TLM, just as long as the local traditions are valued as well.

I recall being at Mass a few times and hearing The Sermon the Priest gave where he cited a particular cultural context familiar (or rather limited) to a few. Given that this was at Mass I didn't say anything, but in my mind I was like, "uuuummm.... no. Father that's not true for all of us". Which brings up another task for a Priest to address his flock in a holistic manner, rather than the cookie cutter method. Sure it takes more work, but is that not the duty of a Priest ?

Just my two cents.
There are a lot of NO parishes that have Mass and Rosary in several languages here in Southward California.  It would be necessary if they were saying mass in the correct language.  When I am at Mass on Sunday I sometimes will glance at other peoples missals.  I see Asian characters, Spanish, and Italian.  I know we have people from India, Poland and some Scandinavian language. 
Multi-Language Masses are redundant. 
Daniel
I would argue that for a parish undergoing a transition from The NO Mass to The TLM, it would be wise for the Priest to at least read The Gospel in the various vernaculars (In my opinion this would make more sense for The Sermon, as that is what is more important for the congregation to hear.) . Again this is solely my opinion for those parishes undergoing  the transition from one liturgical form to the other. At the Melkite parish I have assisted at The Homily is given in both Arabic and English. I don't think this would be a problem for a Priest who currently conducts Masses in various languages. Again this would be temporary, but then again if the Priest and congregation are comfortable with the scenario they can keep it permanently. The only time I could see the multilingual being permissible, is for local chant for a particular feast day/procession which has no Latin equivalent.
(04-24-2009, 10:12 AM)Penitent Wrote: [ -> ]The parish has a largish group of Hispanics, so in an effort to make everyone feel included, he chose to make half of everyone feel excluded. 

And the other half of everyone is bored and excluded.

Exactly how I felt when I used to attend Mass at a NO parish that did this stuff.
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