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I just got back from the pediatric dentist with my 19-month-old. I was concerned about a brown spot on one of her teeth, and indeed, it is a cavity. The dentist told me she got it from being nursed to sleep, but this is the opposite of everything I have ever been told about breastfeeding. However, I can't deny that the cavity is there, and I don't know what else could have caused it -- she is not given juice or sugary drinks, usually only water, I don't give her candy or other sweet, sticky foods, in fact my big problem is getting her to eat any kind of solid food at all. I also force her to have her teeth brushed every night.

Does anyone know anything about tooth decay in infants? We're going for fillings next week -- I'd like to keep the rest of her teeth sound and healthy.
(06-17-2009, 11:58 AM)Satori Wrote: [ -> ]I just got back from the pediatric dentist with my 19-month-old. I was concerned about a brown spot on one of her teeth, and indeed, it is a cavity. The dentist told me she got it from being nursed to sleep, but this is the opposite of everything I have ever been told about breastfeeding. However, I can't deny that the cavity is there, and I don't know what else could have caused it -- she is not given juice or sugary drinks, usually only water, I don't give her candy or other sweet, sticky foods, in fact my big problem is getting her to eat any kind of solid food at all. I also force her to have her teeth brushed every night.

Does anyone know anything about tooth decay in infants? We're going for fillings next week -- I'd like to keep the rest of her teeth sound and healthy.

Going to sleep with a bottle in a big problem so I imagine it is the same for bre
Satori,  I had 4 cavities in my baby teeth, and to this day, I have had only one cavity in my adult teeth.

I think that a predisposition to cavities has more to do with nutrition in the womb than anything.  Also, many factors such as age, stress levels, etc. can affect how your body nourishes your baby in utero.  I've read that Mom's who have lower levels of vitamin D in their blood are more likely to pass on dental problems to their children.

On top of that, the mega-vitamins that are often prescribed during pregnancy can sometimes cause electrolyte imbalances that might cause more harm than good.  I'm not saying pre-natals are always bad, but again, depending on your age and stress levels, your body may not metabolize them correctly causing mineral imbalances.

On top of all this, regardless of your environment, some people are just more genetically predisposed to have problems with their teeth, or to be more sensitve to only slight variations in the environment. 

I hope me sharing this information doesn't come across as critical or anything.  It's difficult to maintain perfect nutrition in the present world, and it's also difficult to discern what "perfect nutrition" entails with all the conflicting information out there.  So, I'm not trying to insinuate that there was a problem with what you were eating while pregnant.  Just putting forth the info I know about what causes cavities at such a young age.

If your baby seems to have a pre-disposition for cavities, for whatever reason, maybe you could try giving her some kind of a water rinse after breast feeding.  Perhaps letting her suck on a wet cloth, or just flushing her mouth with a little water.  I'm also wondering if there's a different kind of diet you can follow to make your breastmilk more alkaline, since alkaline environments help to keep unhealthy bacteria in check.
(06-17-2009, 12:11 PM)Rosarium Wrote: [ -> ](As an aside, breastfeeding a baby with teeth seems risky to me.)

Please please PLEASE just stay off parenting threads.  You have no knowledge and you make idiotic statements like this.




Anyway, Satori, some babies/kids just have weak enamel.  They say there are a lot of different causes, but it's partly genetic.  If that's the case, when she gets older, the dentist can put sealant on her teeth which will help protect them.
Are you using the no-fluoride baby toothpaste?  Maybe switching to one with some fluoride would help?
I've heard of the sealant and think I will ask about it when we go in next week for the dreaded procedure.

I'm 36 and have never had a cavity in either my adult nor baby teeth, even during the periods of my life when I went for years without seeing a dentist. It seems Lucy did not inherit my teeth. However, it may indeed have been my prenatal health, as Inion suggests. I took vitamins and tried to eat well (once I got through the puking-up-everything-that-wasn't-potato-chips stage) but was under tremendous amounts of stress. And of course I'm kind of old.

I have also read that bacteria in the mother's mouth can affect the bacteria in the baby's mouth, thus making the child more or less likely to get cavities. I had to be treated a few months ago for mild gum disease. Could this have been a factor? I mean, I wasn't chewing her food for her or sucking on her toys or anything like that, but still.

If her baby teeth have weak enamel, does that mean her adult teeth will, also?

Is there any truth in what the dentist said about "bottle rot" applying to breastfed babies as well? It seems odd that something so natural and common as nursing a baby to sleep would be likely to cause cavities, unless I've just got super sugary milk.

Rosarium, are you trying to be funny? Certainly it's normal to breastfeed babies with teeth.
(06-17-2009, 01:50 PM)ErinIsNice Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-17-2009, 12:11 PM)Rosarium Wrote: [ -> ](As an aside, breastfeeding a baby with teeth seems risky to me.)

Please please PLEASE just stay off parenting threads.  You have no knowledge and you make idiotic statements like this.




Anyway, Satori, some babies/kids just have weak enamel.  They say there are a lot of different causes, but it's partly genetic.  If that's the case, when she gets older, the dentist can put sealant on her teeth which will help protect them.
Are you using the no-fluoride baby toothpaste?  Maybe switching to one with some fluoride would help?

Erin is 100% correct.  (with all of her comments here, lol  ;D)  The comment about babies with teeth being dangerous, Rosarium, is one of the most innane comments I have seen on F.E. Our 5yo still nurses on occasion. as does our 2yo. Both have full sets of teeth.

All of our babies have slept with us, and my wife nurses them to sleep every evening, as well as nursing them again during the night. My kids could be in a dentist's commercial about how teeth should look. Breast feeding is one of the best things in the world you can do for proper tooth, gum and jaw development.
(06-17-2009, 02:11 PM)Satori Wrote: [ -> ]Rosarium, are you trying to be funny? Certainly it's normal to breastfeed babies with teeth.

No. I don't have any experience with breatfeeding or most other baby related things. I'm not even sure when babies start getting teeth. I know of a woman in my family who mentioned issues with one of her children when that child had teeth. This baby was pretty aggressive so I'm not sure what was done with the other children.

(06-17-2009, 01:50 PM)ErinIsNice Wrote: [ -> ]Please please PLEASE just stay off parenting threads.  You have no knowledge and you make idiotic statements like this.

I admitted my lack of knowledge in the area of babies (specifically, their teeth), but I do know stuff about dental care and tried to give input as dental care is a concern of mine (care of adult teeth) and I tried to give input based on that knowledge and on the assumption that teeth are teeth and that perhaps there are similiarites in adult and baby teeth. I also had the assumption that milk has properties that are universal as well.

I'm sorry I made a mistake. Obviously teeth aren't a problem for most babies (that one must have been different).

So, in short:

* I'm sorry for being an idiot
* I'm sorry for being innane
* I'm sorry for making a mistaken

Why jump all over me over this though? This forum has never held people to be mistake free in their posts (that is a benefit of posting, to learn) and this forum hasn't required people to be experts to post on threads. I'll stay off parenting threads though.
(06-17-2009, 03:33 PM)matthew_talbot Wrote: [ -> ]All of our babies have slept with us, and my wife nurses them to sleep every evening, as well as nursing them again during the night. My kids could be in a dentist's commercial about how teeth should look. Breast feeding is one of the best things in the world you can do for proper tooth, gum and jaw development.

Sounds like you have a nice family.

(06-17-2009, 03:33 PM)matthew_talbot Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-17-2009, 01:50 PM)ErinIsNice Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-17-2009, 12:11 PM)Rosarium Wrote: [ -> ](As an aside, breastfeeding a baby with teeth seems risky to me.)

Please please PLEASE just stay off parenting threads.  You have no knowledge and you make idiotic statements like this.




Anyway, Satori, some babies/kids just have weak enamel.  They say there are a lot of different causes, but it's partly genetic.  If that's the case, when she gets older, the dentist can put sealant on her teeth which will help protect them.
Are you using the no-fluoride baby toothpaste?  Maybe switching to one with some fluoride would help?

Erin is 100% correct.  (with all of her comments here, lol  ;D)  The comment about babies with teeth being dangerous, Rosarium, is one of the most innane comments I have seen on F.E. Our 5yo still nurses on occasion. as does our 2yo. Both have full sets of teeth.

All of our babies have slept with us, and my wife nurses them to sleep every evening, as well as nursing them again during the night. My kids could be in a dentist's commercial about how teeth should look. Breast feeding is one of the best things in the world you can do for proper tooth, gum and jaw development.

Well, do you have any idea what could be going on with my kid's teeth? Because I nurse her pretty much the same way your wife nurses your kids. What do you and your wife do for their teeth? I guess your five-year-old is old enough to brush, but what did you do when she was a baby?
SATORI

I think it definitely has to do with genetics. Both my daughters ( 4and a half and 3) have TERRIBLE teeth. I brought my oldest to the dentist a month or 2 ago, and was told she would need 5,000 worth of work done. Her front tooth had a brown spot and is decaying badly, as is a molar in the back. I never put mu kids to bed with cups or bottles, and they brush EVERY day. They were all breastfed till 12 - 15 months.  My neice, who never brushes, is 7, and has a perfect set of teeth. ALSO, my husbands teeth literally rotted out of his mouth by 6, and his adult teeth are perfect white and shiny! I still have trouble with mine a bit though. The dentist and doctors said my kids teeth decay is also caused by their VERY acidic saliva, they get bad bum rashes too, from it.
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