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I baked a cake last night and both layers broke when I was trying to get them out of the pans. This happens to me a lot. Do any of you bakers have advice for me on getting my cakes out in one piece? Yes, I greased and floured both pans and let the cakes cool off a little bit before I started. I also slid a knife along the edge to "break" the web of batter that tends to cling to the sides. No luck.
(06-21-2009, 09:42 AM)Satori Wrote: [ -> ]I baked a cake last night and both layers broke when I was trying to get them out of the pans. This happens to me a lot. Do any of you bakers have advice for me on getting my cakes out in one piece? Yes, I greased and floured both pans and let the cakes cool off a little bit before I started. I also slid a knife along the edge to "break" the web of batter that tends to cling to the sides. No luck.

let the cakes cool at least 10 or 15 minutes in the pan - make sure that they are baked long enough - after you do the knife around the perimeter, jiggle the pan from side to side ( like panning for gold) and loosen it up.

Finally, when you flip the cake over, put your hand (with a sheet of wax paper on it if you want) over the cake first.

If it's a huge cake, put a large UPSIDE DOWN and COVERED in wax paper cookie sheet or whatever is it's size, on TOP of the cake.

THEN flip it.

Don't touch it till it's all the way cool, or it may break apart.


:)
You might also try tapping all over the bottom of the pan with a butter knife before lifting it up  :)
Those were good tips -I've had similar problems.  So how do you frost the cake without getting a load of crumbs that make problems?  I've heard you can take a pastry brush and get rid of some that way, but I still end up with cake crumbs all over the place.  (yet another reason why I don't decorate cakes for a living.)
Buy a "frosting bag" with metal tips. You can find them at Wal Mart for less than $10.00  :)
Joamy, it's an extra step, but it works:

get apricot jelly( or any other jelly, but apricot has the mildest taste) and add a little hot water to it, until you can apply it with a brush - brush off the crumbs, then brush on the jelly.

let it set a few minutes, then frost the cake.

even better if you put a really thin layer of frosting before you do the final, thicker frosting.
But you didn't tell us what kind of cake it was!!!!!!!!!!!  :shame: I just made 24 cupcakes and a giant strawberry upside down cake. Now I have to do the dishes, but I'm on here instead.   :dunce:

So, cakes that break.  I used to have that problem until I stopped flouring the pans - I just grease those bad boys with plain ole margarine, a goodly amount, and the cakes slide right out.  I don't even wait for them to cool, just  put a plate over the pan and turn it upside down and whoopsy daisy, there you go.   

If you want to do something drastic, line the cake pan with aluminum foil which you've sprayed with that horrible Pam stuff.  You can pop it right out and then peel off the foil once it's cooled.  The pans stay cleaner as well.  That's what I do when I make brownies.   A last resort would be springform pans - my friends who bake often swear by them. 



Magnificat, it was a foamy white butter cake for which I was planning to make lemon icing. It would have been so succulent, but both layers broke beyond repair. I might as well heap the pieces in a bowl with strawberry jam and whipped cream.

I hadn't thought of using the springform pan. That WOULD be easier to deal with ...

Do you think margarine is better for greasing pans than butter? I know you have to use it because you're vegan, but in your experience does it work better from a practical standpoint?

My mother used to have a couple of old cake pans with a flat strip of metal attached to the insides. The strip was fastened to the center bottom of the pan and hooked up over the side. After the cake had cooled, she only had to slide the strip around and the cake came out beautifully. I wish I had a couple of those.
(06-21-2009, 08:05 PM)Satori Wrote: [ -> ]Magnificat, it was a foamy white butter cake for which I was planning to make lemon icing. It would have been so succulent, but both layers broke beyond repair. I might as well heap the pieces in a bowl with strawberry jam and whipped cream.

I hadn't thought of using the springform pan. That WOULD be easier to deal with ...

Do you think margarine is better for greasing pans than butter? I know you have to use it because you're vegan, but in your experience does it work better from a practical standpoint?

My mother used to have a couple of old cake pans with a flat strip of metal attached to the insides. The strip was fastened to the center bottom of the pan and hooked up over the side. After the cake had cooled, she only had to slide the strip around and the cake came out beautifully. I wish I had a couple of those.

We have a couple (for all the baking I ever do...)
(06-21-2009, 08:05 PM)Satori Wrote: [ -> ]Magnificat, it was a foamy white butter cake for which I was planning to make lemon icing. It would have been so succulent, but both layers broke beyond repair. I might as well heap the pieces in a bowl with strawberry jam and whipped cream.

I hadn't thought of using the springform pan. That WOULD be easier to deal with ...

Do you think margarine is better for greasing pans than butter? I know you have to use it because you're vegan, but in your experience does it work better from a practical standpoint?

My mother used to have a couple of old cake pans with a flat strip of metal attached to the insides. The strip was fastened to the center bottom of the pan and hooked up over the side. After the cake had cooled, she only had to slide the strip around and the cake came out beautifully. I wish I had a couple of those.

My mother had pie shells like that - nothing ever stuck, but then my mother is the maker of perfect pie crust.  It's paper thin and melts in your mouth, yet not greasy. 

Yes, I do think margarine, swill though it is,  is better than butter for greasing pans.  I think the milk solids in the butter make the difference - margarine is pure grease, hardly different from Crisco and only 69 cents a pound!
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