FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums

Full Version: Pope Benedict XVI's Jesus of Nazareth?
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Pages: 1 2 3
I've been lurking in the corners for quite a while now (and probably will continue to do so for a bit longer  :)), but am looking for a discussion on Pope Benedict's book Jesus of Nazareth. I am sure there is already a (possibly quite lengthy) discussion on the book somewhere here, but I wasn't able to find it. The forum's search is not particularly useful for a phrase search, and a Google site-specific search is in this case hard as well as Credo's signature contains all the terms I was searching for, so that any thread Credo posted in comes up in the search results!

Could someone direct me to the thread on the Pope's book? Or in the unlikely case that there isn't one here, I'd be interested in what you all thought of the book.
(07-19-2009, 04:47 PM)ecclesiastes Wrote: [ -> ]Or in the unlikely case that there isn't one here, I'd be interested in what you all thought of the book.

I too am unaware of any such thread...I read it some time ago and, while well-written, I remmeber thinking that it wasn't particularly enlightening - that is, that I didn't get anything out of it that wasn't already clear to me or that I found novel to the book in of itself. I may be coming to a hasty generalization when I say this, though, it probably wasn't as banal as I am making it sound. I guess time has obscured what inital response.

Anything in particular you were looking to discuss?
(07-19-2009, 05:39 PM)IVSTINIVS Wrote: [ -> ]I read it some time ago and, while well-written, I remmeber thinking that it wasn't particularly enlightening - that is, that I didn't get anything out of it that wasn't already clear to me or that I found novel to the book in of itself. I guess time has obscured what inital response.

Ha, now that I remember back, I was reading Ben Witherington's "What Have They Done with Jesus?" at the same time and his outlandish and bold claims (such as evidence to support his theory that the Disciple Whom Jesus Loved was actually Lazarus) may have overpowered any tidbit of good to come out of the Holy Father's book.
I read this book some time ago. In this book, the pope acknowledged the findings of modern critical-historical method in giving depth and vitality to the 'historical' Jesus but presented Jesus of Nazareth as the same Jesus Christ of faith. As the pope said: the Gospel is true in that the Gospel witnesses could not have presented Jesus as merely of history. Also, the pope said Jesus has brought God to the people in the most direct and palpable manner: seeing the Son is seeing the Father. In his book, the pope may not have said anything new, but he has presented anew who Jesus is with his usual lucid and penetrative mind. A highly recommended book.
I'm actually reading Jesus of Nazareth right now. It will be my pre-Compline reading for tonight in fact.

While tipping his hat to useful findings in the historical-critical school of exegesis, the pope attempts to unify the modern schizophrenia which separates the "Christ of faith" from the "Christ of history." Jesus of Nazareth is not as fluid as Sheen's Life of Christ, Sheed's To Know Christ Jesus, and it's certainly nowhere near as readable as The Poem of the Man-God (though this last one is in something of a different category). However, it is useful and provides a number of interesting considerations to the readers. This is especially true concerning the pope's analysis litteary motifs like bread, vines, wine, etc.

ecclesiastes Wrote:The forum's search is not particularly useful for a phrase search, and a Google site-specific search is in this case hard as well as Credo's signature contains all the terms I was searching for, so that any thread Credo posted in comes up in the search results!

I'm flattered.
I started reading the book, but haven't gotten very far yet. I just finished the Introduction, which I thought was good and refreshing. I sometimes expected more from it, but then reminded myself that the book was written with a general readership in mind.
I read this book when it came out.  I had to read it twice to digest many of the things Pope Benedict said.  I had hoped he would be more critical of the historical-critical exegetes who seem intent on destroying Jesus, but he nevertheless pointed out their greatest failing and the true contradiction of everything they do, attempt to separate Jesus from Christ.

I thought much of what he had to say was deep or at least showed me the depths of the spiritual waters waiting for me in the Gospels.

Pope Benedict is not as confrontational as I would like.  But he is definitely not part of the ecumenical crowd either.  He seems to be paving the way for others to be more confrontational after him, calling out with the voice of a gentle Shepherd to the lost sheep to return to the Sheepfold.

I am very much looking forward to the second book.

Dominus tecum
(07-28-2009, 03:54 PM)ecclesiastes Wrote: [ -> ]. I sometimes expected more from it,

That sums up what I thought of the book it wasnt bad but It wasnt what I expected. I am timidly looking foreward to the new one. I read that  the Pope is having some of his Lutheran buddies from his Tubungin/Tubingin??(sp) days help him with it so I am not expecting much.
(07-30-2009, 11:51 PM)Baskerville Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-28-2009, 03:54 PM)ecclesiastes Wrote: [ -> ]. I sometimes expected more from it,

That sums up what I thought of the book it wasnt bad but It wasnt what I expected. I am timidly looking foreward to the new one. I read that  the Pope is having some of his Lutheran buddies from his Tubungin/Tubingin??(sp) days help him with it so I am not expecting much.

Tuebingen.  (I'm currently about 30 minutes away from it)

;)
Ahh Danke.
Pages: 1 2 3