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http://www.spiritdaily.com/timestemplate.htm


The End of One Mystery...


And the beginning of another



By Robert Moynihan, reporting from Rome

================================

"Lacrimae rerum." ("The tears of things.") —Virgil, The Aeneid (Book 1, line 462)

===========================


The Briefcase Left Behind (continued)

I began my conversation with the monsignor indicated to me by Cardinal Gagnon as he lay dying with the simple fact of Gagnon's passing in August of 2007.

We spoke in Italian. The conversation took place in the fall of 2007.

"I was sorry to hear of Cardinal Gagnon's passing," I said.

"Yes, so was I," the monsignor said. "He was a great servant of the Church. He suffered a great deal."

"I knew him," I said. "He was always helpful to me, especially when I was beginning."

"He was a kind man."

And then we began our usual conversation, on the state of the Church, the latest news in the Vatican, and so forth. Our conversation turned naturally to the publication on July 7, 2007, of the motu proprio Summorum Pontificum, which promoted wider use of the old rite of the Mass.


"I'm confused," I said.

"Why?" he said.

"The whole thing," I said. "What happened at the Second Vatican Council, the Constitution on the Liturgy, the Commission established to revise the Mass, Monsignor Annibale Bugnini. [Ordained in 1936 and named archbishop in 1972, he was secretary of the commission that worked on the reform of the Catholic liturgy that followed the Second Vatican Council]... And now, 40 years later, we seem to be still in a state of confusion. It seems like all the things we held sacred — all the things we loved — have been trampled upon."

"You are too gloomy," he said, waving his hand dismissively. "Yes, things have been trampled upon, but the essential remains. Don't lose heart."

"Does the essential remain?" I asked. "Look around. We have some who don't care about any traditions at all, they look at the 'old Church' as narrow and guilt-ridden, and they will do anything not to go back. And we have many traditionalists who seem to focus solely on externals — it sometimes seems an idolatry of the ritual..."

"I don't see it that black-and-white," the monsignor said. "You are leaving out all the individuals, all their acts of sacrifice, their good humor, their prayer. You have fallen into a trap. In the fight over truth, don't forget grace. Remember, there is God, the Holy Spirit, Mary..."

"But why do so many seem not to care?"

"Some are thoughtless. Some are persuaded the Church should be changed. Some just flow with the tide. Some are motivated by money. And then there are those who serve other masters. That was the case with Bugnini..."

I was startled. Not because of what he said, because it is an old allegation, but because of the way he said it, as if it was something settled, beyond discussion.


"Of course, I have heard that," I said, "but why do you say it so bluntly, as if it were certain? I thought it was just an allegation?"

"It is certain," he said. "At least, as certain as anything can be in this world. He went to a meeting in the Secretariat of State, with his briefcase. It was in 1975. Later that evening, when everyone had gone home, a monsignor found the briefcase Bugnini had left behind. The monsignor decided to open it to see who the owner was. And when he opened it, he found letters inside addressed to Bugnini, as to a brother, from the Grand Master of Italian Freemasonry..."

"But could those letters have been forgeries?" I asked. "Could someone have opened the briefcase, seen it was Bugnini's, and then slipped these false documents inside, to frame him?"

"Well, theoretically, I suppose, that is possible. [Note to readers: Bugnini himself always said the allegations were false, that he was never a freemason, and that the charges were made against him by disgruntled conservatives who opposed the work he had done on the liturgy.] But Paul VI, at least, didn't think so. When the evidence was brought to him, he came to the conclusion that Bugnini needed to be removed immediately from his post. Bugnini was made the papal nuncio in Iran. After more than 25 years as the head of the liturgical reform, he was abruptly fired and sent to a country where there are hardly any Catholics at all. It was a type of banishment.

"That is very sad," I said.

"No," he said, "it is very human... And today, 35 years later, it is in the past. It is something we can do nothing about."

"But if this is really true," I said, "then Paul VI may have approved of the new Mass under 'false pretences,' as it were. Wouldn't that raise questions about the entire liturgical reform? And why, then, did Paul VI not go back to the drawing board, if he believed what you say was true?"

(For more on the letters in the briefcase, see: http://www.traditioninaction.org/Progres...iMason.htm)



==============================


The Monsignor Sums Up


"Look," the monsignor said, "no matter how many defeats the Church suffers, no matter how many betrayals, there is always hope..."

"But the losses are so great," I said, "it is as if the link between our time and the past has been severed..."

"No!" He looked fiercely at me. "You yourself are evidence that it has not been severed. And so am I. And I tell you, that even were you to fall, and betray the faith, and even were I to fall, and even if all around us were to fall, still, the Church will not be defeated. She will prevail. Non praevalebunt!"

And I looked at him and marveled at his faith.

And I still had not asked him about the Gagnon dossier...

=========================================

(More to come...)
Interesting....I never knew about Bugnini being banished to Iran.
Am I the only one who reads this as poorly written fiction?
I have no idea what that was. Is that a real guy? When was this written and what is it?  ???
Quote:I have no idea what that was. Is that a real guy? When was this written and what is it?

The source is Robert Moynahan.  The article is from the TIA website, so it's bunk right there.  I don't know the Monsignor.  But yes, Bugnini was a real guy and he was at the forefront of all the "changes" we have had to endure since, well, you know....  There were rumors that he was a freemason, but never substantiated.
(07-20-2009, 11:32 PM)didishroom Wrote: [ -> ]Interesting....I never knew about Bugnini being banished to Iran.

Yeah the story goes that in the early 1970's after the reforms were in place and the new Church was born and its false liturgy firmly in place Pope Paul found out that Bugnini was a Freemason and banished him to Iran as punishment. Yet he still kept the masonic/protestant Mass in place. :pazzo:
bugnini was banished to iran. for what is the question but he certainly was banished there
(07-21-2009, 12:00 AM)JonW Wrote: [ -> ]
Quote:I have no idea what that was. Is that a real guy? When was this written and what is it?

The source is Robert Moynahan.  The article is from the TIA website, so it's bunk right there.  I don't know the Monsignor.  But yes, Bugnini was a real guy and he was at the forefront of all the "changes" we have had to endure since, well, you know....  There were rumors that he was a freemason, but never substantiated.

Interesting. I haven't found too much on the TIA site either. Some articles on the site have been helpful but I can only think of a handful. TIA just seems a little odd.

pax
Greetings All!

This is my first post here...but I'm thankful to have found this site...May God bless all of you! :pazzo:

Anyway, I thought I would mention that I followed the links from the Spirit Daily site and found the original article in the Newsflash section of 'Inside the Vatican'  monthly news magazine, attributed to Dr. Robert Moynihan, as noted....

I am providing the link here, as I believe that is allowed:

http://www.insidethevatican.com/newsflas...-19-09.htm

God bless,

Melvin

Dr. Moynihan does not indicate that this article is fiction, as far as I can tell...
It may be faction. Faction is an actual story dressesd up with names to protect the identities of those involved and the events maybe combined to serve the purpose of calrification. I would not dismiss these facts. Bugnini was "outed in an Italian paper named Si Si No No.
The story published had his name, number, and code words included. The priest that published the article, also "outed" a total of thirteen, and intended to publish more as he confirmed the information. And for those that weren't there Roberto Calvi of the Vatican Bank Scandal went to his death under the Black friars Bridge but his "papers" from his briefcase surfaced in Italy and the names of over one  hundred and thirty Freemasons who were in the Vatican at that time.A friend of the family was investigated by the Feds for Cardinal Marcinkus and his involvement in the Banco Ambrosiano scandal. This scandal is reported to be how Pope John Paul II got the money to topple the Polish Government. My family friend is a Monsignor that is a turnaround expert in finance.   
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