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(07-27-2009, 10:24 AM)timoose Wrote: [ -> ]Not to be dramatic, but those of us that survive the coming cataclysm may be should return to our ancestral lands. I figure I'd go back to Liguria or the Piedmont. It would be nice to hear Zenese spoken again. I wonder if my last name Podesta entitles me to hold that office again. ;D
tim

Tim, I think after Chastisement, but prior to Antichrist, by many accounts of seers,etc, we will return to the land........Distributism of sorts whether some may like it or not just to survive......sort of "knit, can and grow" or perish.......Me, looking into places to go as well......though not ancestral lands......
(07-27-2009, 11:06 AM)Credo Wrote: [ -> ]The SSPX basically runs St. Mary's, KS. The founder of Domino's Pizza has also set up a totally Catholic town near his Ave Maria University. That being said, the whole Catholic ghetto thing has always creeped me out. I get a nighmare idea of everyone in your town looking over your shoulder to make sure to said the Angelus or that you aren't wearing shorts or something. 

Ghettos are not all the bad, though the name is.....fortified towns have harder time breaking down walls by invaders........Ave Maria is Neocon, some no thanks there.........
(07-27-2009, 11:23 AM)ErinIsNice Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-27-2009, 11:06 AM)Credo Wrote: [ -> ]That being said, the whole Catholic ghetto thing has always creeped me out. I get a nighmare idea of everyone in your town looking over your shoulder to make sure to said the Angelus or that you aren't wearing shorts or something. 

That's how St. Mary's is.  I met a family there that actually moved farther away from town because the mom and girls wore pants and shorts.

That is a never ending debate as well, should have put that in my first response........you are nice!!
I have fond memories of two ghetto-parishes. The first was The Church of the Assumption where I was baptised, but the neighborhood was demolished in the 1950's bit by bit. It was predominately Northern Italians immigrants from Genoa or the Piedmont and Piacenza. The priests were Servites and everyone spoke Italian including the priests. They were real tenements like in the honeymooners on TV. Wash was hung out to dry on the fourth or fifth story roofs. Very few did not avail themselves of the Sacraments.Many made Salame or Salume or Prosciutto which hung in dirt floor basements, oops wine too. The grammar school was founded by Mother Cabrini and was bi-lingual, Italian and English, and my mother took the highest awards upon graduation.The Servites had other parishes as St. Phillip Neri, St. Phillip Benezi, and St. Dominic. They are all gone, except the Church of the Assumption. Most of the Northern Italians were Republicans but the old Mayor Daley used to come to a Dinner to raise money for the Church every year. in those days there was little strife between Republicans and Democrats though as today the Democrats were loaded.

My second was St. Andrew's Church where my great grand mother the Genovese came to live after they demolished her home and life. She was in a wheel chair and me and my brother would engage her brake to be mischievous. This  neighborhood was way mixed. Italians, Germans, Slavs, Hungarians, Irish, and tiny amount of Mexicans. This was an ethnic melting pot but it was a melting pot glued together by Catholicism. I learned a smattering of many languages, and tasted the food of many cultures. Not like today where everyone thinks they know what is Italian from Lydia on TV or some other phony.

Using my friend's Laszlo measurement as a yard stick these ghettos approached the Vatican in Catholicity. There was also more charity and a realization that we all were sinners. You didn't stick your nose in some ones transgression unless it approached some thing terrible.
There was also a fighting spirit. If someone as an intruder caused real harm like attempting a rape or a robbery he would be dealt with swiftly. My father once subdued a would be rapist while holding up his overalls and with his GI 45 caliber sent a shot which caused the pervert to surrender. The police thanked him and said he could let him go and that they would take him to the Station. He's lucky my father wasn't angry or he might have been neutered.

Dr. Rao writes a bit about how important it is to have this type of community. From what I have read until we have little ghetto-parishes or little towns or little villages to bring back tradition with a small t we will not be able to bring back tradition with a capital T. You see the American idea of the little nuclear family is not Catholic, it is Protestant. Catholic is the extended family. Before we can bring back the Reign of Christ the King we must get rid of the Protestant notions. Parishes in a city, or a small town or a village will bring cohesion around the Church Parish. Homogeneity is unimportant a diverse ethnic group as long as it is Catholic is good and can afford the children a better understanding of other Catholic customs.
 
(07-27-2009, 01:17 PM)timoose Wrote: [ -> ]Dr. Rao writes a bit about how important it is to have this type of community. From what I have read until we have little ghetto-parishes or little towns or little villages to bring back tradition with a small t we will not be able to bring back tradition with a capital T. You see the American idea of the little nuclear family is not Catholic, it is Protestant. Catholic is the extended family. Before we can bring back the Reign of Christ the King we must get rid of the Protestant notions. Parishes in a city, or a small town or a village will bring cohesion around the Church Parish. Homogeneity is unimportant a diverse ethnic group as long as it is Catholic is good and can afford the children a better understanding of other Catholic customs.
 

Fantastic! I really think that this is at the heart of it.
(07-27-2009, 11:17 AM)Credo Wrote: [ -> ]That place looks awesome. That S. Peter's parish looks great. Holy cow, a church that has the Divine Office on a regular and expansive basis! However, Vespers at 1:45pm?

Only for Sunday. I suppose the priests need some time for themselves. They are 'outsourced' from Chicago, suppose they like to be with the community.

In any way, the 'call it a day' or ;say good night' prayer is the Compline, not the Vespers. In the good old times in the diocesan cathedrals (in Hungary)  the Vespers was chanted at 3 PM
The Volo, IL church is under the leadership of St. John Cantius in Chicago.  Thank God for the daily Tridentine Mass that's offered (in Chicago and also in Volo), but the Canons Regular of St. John Cantius most decidedly do not seem to view the Tridentine Mass as somehow superior to the Novus Ordo.  I've not heard these words out of the mouth of the pastor, Fr. Phillips, but actions speak louder than words.  They routinely offer a "dressed-up Novus Ordo" for very holy days (Holy Thursday, Holy Saturday) instead of the Tridentine High Mass.  That was a rude awakening to me as that was my new parish.  Oh well, at least I can go there for my Sunday Low Mass.  As far as their praying the Hours, in Chicago they pray the hours in English and it's the "Liturgy of the Hours" (the revised, contemporary prayers), not the traditional Divine Office.

Melita, I know there are Podesta's on Malta. One of them a priest was a point man for the last world youth day. I tried to get in touch with him but couldn't. My family is from Ne in Liguria originally. I wanted to get in touch with him to see if his family was from there too. There are quite a few in America but we don't all know each other. Yet from what I've read we all descend from the same places in Liguria.
Podesta is the name of an official next in power to the Mayor. He would be the learned one behind the Mayor.
tim
(07-27-2009, 01:30 PM)glgas Wrote: [ -> ]In any way, the 'call it a day' or ;say good night' prayer is the Compline, not the Vespers. In the good old times in the diocesan cathedrals (in Hungary)  the Vespers was chanted at 3 PM

I think that, though it is difficult outside of a monastery, one should seek to recite the hours of the Divine Office at regular intervals (eg, every three hours). What sense does it make to have recited six of the hours by 1.45 or 3pm, only to wait 8 or 9pm for the last? The recitation of Vespers at 5 or 6pm seems much more reasonable to me.
In the countryside of most of southern Europe (Italy especially) and eastern Europe (Poland, Ukraine, Slovakia, parts of Hungary, Hungarian Romania) and the Balkans there are plenty of old school Catholic villages. In most of these places it feels like the 1400s not the 21st century uh save for electricity. Also in the Near East in Outremer there are planty of Catholic communities (also Greek Orthodox and occasional Jacobite) but due to Islamic expansion and their war against the Jews they are caught in the cross fire and are shrinking

The cities are a different story  :puke: damn reds I say nuke em' all

edit: I've never been to Germany but I imagine in the southern parts they may be a few traditional villages wre everyone goes to Mass

Also I believe in celtic parts of France - Breton I think it called (the place were the Germans had a big Uboat base) - I remember reading that is the most Catholic part of France, never been to France so perhaps a Francophile could correct or expand me.
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