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So, there is this movement called The Free State Project, http://www.freestateproject.org/. Its aim is to recruit 20,000 people to move to New Hampshire, an already fairly ideal state for those who love the US Constitution, and once this number is reached, move en masse to the state. There, they hope to continue to influence politics and further mold New Hampshire into their ideal state.

What if Catholics did something similar? A Catholic City Project. I'm talking about traditional Catholicism, of course... they can keep their Ave Maria, FL. What if we set a number of, say, 2000 traditional Catholics to move to an already somewhat Catholic area, like Scranton PA, just for example. It would take some research to find a town that could support such a sudden flux, but is it possible? A certain set of desirable characteristics could be developed, to ensure that there is solidarity and true community (so as not to have a group who says the New Mass is invalid and they keep to themselves, forming cliques and the like within this community).

Obviously the ideal for many people would be to actually establish a brand new community, but the difficulties in this have already been seen. Perhaps this is a viable alternative. Any thoughts?
actiofidei Wrote:they can keep their Ave Maria, FL.

Who are 'they'?

Quote:Any thoughts?

Yes. It's a horrible idea. Christians are to be a leaven to society. Christ has some very harsh words for those who keep their talents to themselves.
In order to be a leaven to society we have to be in disparate places throughout the earth? Isn't this the same argument hurled against monastics?
How would you find 2000 traditional Catholics to agree on something?  ;D

Plus, how would you be able to find 2000 new jobs to support these families?

I doubt you'd succeed in finding an area that could do that, especially nowadays.

What should be done, if you're going to do anything, is round up about 250 traditional Catholic households, find a clean river, and some farm land out in the Plains, go there, and form your own village.  Have a bakery, a butcher, a farmer, etc, etc. 

My two cents.

Or, get 2000 traditional Catholics to buy land in Detroit, and help save that city.  ;D  I heard land is cheap there. 
Being able to sustain a sudden inrush of citizens is the biggest obstacle I can foresee. 2000 was meant to be an arbitrary number, though. If there is a number and place where it could work out, then that is what would be settles on. Detroit, eh... heh.
(08-06-2009, 10:49 AM)actiofidei Wrote: [ -> ]Being able to sustain a sudden inrush of citizens is the biggest obstacle I can foresee. 2000 was meant to be an arbitrary number, though. If there is a number and place where it could work out, then that is what would be settles on. Detroit, eh... heh.

Yeah.  Well, either way, it'd be hard to find X > 50 jobs all at once for traditional Catholics.  Not that we don't run the gamut of jobs, but, I think you get my point.

But, where else would be a better place?  It's cheap, it's RIGHT on the river, it's also right by Canada and it has its own little lake.  I'm willing to bet there's an old closed down Catholic church you could purchase, annnnd it needs all the help it can get!
(08-06-2009, 10:01 AM)actiofidei Wrote: [ -> ]So, there is this movement called The Free State Project, http://www.freestateproject.org/. Its aim is to recruit 20,000 people to move to New Hampshire, an already fairly ideal state for those who love the US Constitution, and once this number is reached, move en masse to the state. There, they hope to continue to influence politics and further mold New Hampshire into their ideal state.

What if Catholics did something similar? A Catholic City Project. I'm talking about traditional Catholicism, of course... they can keep their Ave Maria, FL. What if we set a number of, say, 2000 traditional Catholics to move to an already somewhat Catholic area, like Scranton PA, just for example. It would take some research to find a town that could support such a sudden flux, but is it possible? A certain set of desirable characteristics could be developed, to ensure that there is solidarity and true community (so as not to have a group who says the New Mass is invalid and they keep to themselves, forming cliques and the like within this community).

Obviously the ideal for many people would be to actually establish a brand new community, but the difficulties in this have already been seen. Perhaps this is a viable alternative. Any thoughts?

I think probably it would be a good idea to establish a list of objective criteria to determine which areas are already, right now, the best places.  Once people have this information, the communities can grow from there.

BTW, those people are going to RUIN New Hampshire. 
(08-06-2009, 11:47 AM)Magnificat Wrote: [ -> ]BTW, those people are going to RUIN New Hampshire. 

Haha, how is that?
Once upon a time in a galaxy far, far, away...Urban renewal had blighted the landscapes of most cities in america, The people living in squalor started a squatter movement to take back the shells of these buildings and fix them to live in.

Detroit is now like that as has been mentioned here before. Houses are a few to several thousand dollars. It could be a place to start. Buy two and raze the worst and grow crops on that one. You could sell the excess. Work any jobs. Fix the better house as you go. Scavenge for stuff, fix it, and sell it to your neighbors. Gird your loins and let your light shine forth. Ten Catholics with small money could buy both sides of a city block, raze the bad houses and grow food become a co-op and sell the rest. Imagine a Catholic oasis in a sea of mire shining a light for others to come.
tim

 
(08-06-2009, 10:01 AM)actiofidei Wrote: [ -> ]What if Catholics did something similar? A Catholic City Project. I'm talking about traditional Catholicism, of course... they can keep their Ave Maria, FL. What if we set a number of, say, 2000 traditional Catholics to move to an already somewhat Catholic area, like Scranton PA, just for example. It would take some research to find a town that could support such a sudden flux, but is it possible? A certain set of desirable characteristics could be developed, to ensure that there is solidarity and true community (so as not to have a group who says the New Mass is invalid and they keep to themselves, forming cliques and the like within this community).

If you all do come to Scranton, let me know.
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