FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums

Full Version: Ugh..."Church in the Round" - ca. 1953!
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
(09-06-2009, 02:45 PM)QuisUtDeus Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-06-2009, 07:42 AM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-06-2009, 07:08 AM)timjp77 Wrote: [ -> ]notice none of the women are wearing chapel veils.

None. Everybody wore hats. . at least in the USA.

Nothing screams "neo trad" more than a mantilla.

It only makes sense to wear a mantilla since no one, man or woman, wears hats anymore.    They wore hats in Mass since they wore them on the street back then.

I wear hats all the time, except at home.  I like them and I hope eventually other women will start wearing them again.


Down here you usually only see flags in church if it's a veteran's funeral and there's one covering the coffin.  Sometimes they don't put on the flag until the after coffin leaves the church, but I don't know why.
(09-06-2009, 07:59 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-06-2009, 06:28 PM)QuisUtDeus Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-06-2009, 06:25 PM)Martinus Wrote: [ -> ]In America, then, it was more a pre-Vatican II thing? So you never see it nowadays?

I cannot ever recall seeing an American flag in any Novus Ordo Church, but I have from time-to-time seen the Vatican flag.  Though, I have to admit, I haven't exactly inspected for what flags are where...

All of the NO parishes in my archdioceses have US Flags and Vatican Flags.  Even the spaceship parishes.

Same here.  I honestly don't think I've ever seen an NO church without an American flag.
Seems to vary from country to country (and, in the US, from state to state) then...

That's to be expected, I suppose. I imagine here in the UK there would have been mixed feelings about having Union flags in sanctuaries back in the day. And today, patriotism of any kind is hated by the liberals so one would hardly expect to see it introduced.

As for the English (as opposed to UK) flag, that seems to have become nothing more than a symbol of the national football team.
I'm not sure how I feel about national flags in church.  I think a good portion of me would argue against it.
StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:Patriotism and good citizenship went arm-in-arm with religion back then.

So did Americanism.

In consideration of the zillion American flags in the black and white photo, however, it must be remembered in fairness that it was taken during WWII.

My understanding is that before the Council the United States was permitted a special privilege to have a flag in the sanctuary. This probably had to do with the suspicions Catholics in America were under as being subversive to the country. I imagine the flag stipulation has liberalized somewhat, with every nation being able to be represented on their respective altars.
(09-06-2009, 08:39 PM)Walty Wrote: [ -> ]I'm not sure how I feel about national flags in church.  I think a good portion of me would argue against it.

Well, if there's a healthy patriotism among the catholic population (as there probably should be), then I'd say it's fine.

It shouldn't stray into the territory of over-the-top nationalsim though.
(09-06-2009, 08:39 PM)Walty Wrote: [ -> ]I'm not sure how I feel about national flags in church.  I think a good portion of me would argue against it.

Just take them as a reminder to pray that God will bless America.  Please.
(09-06-2009, 08:50 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-06-2009, 08:39 PM)Walty Wrote: [ -> ]I'm not sure how I feel about national flags in church.  I think a good portion of me would argue against it.

Just take them as a reminder to pray that God will bless America.  Please.

I can understand that.

I can even understand patriotism to some extent, but ever since nationalism was let out of the bottle, I see it doing more harm than good.  That genie is still floating all over the place.  In fact, I'd say things haven't changed much in that regard since WWII, especially in America.
LOL, neo-trad.

Yes, the mantilla can be kind of a neo-tradism depending on what culture you're from, but it's not necessarily a bad thing. Just as long as you don't go around saying "my grandmother and great-grandmother wore the same thing", when they actually wore hats or other types of headcovering. I prefer hats as well.

The mantilla is, I think, becoming a symbol of modern traditional culture, the same way that a modern traditional priest might be wearing a cassock absolutely everywhere, even to play soccer, when historically, most pre-conciliar priests simply changed into something else. I'm sure it could also be argued that a congregation where everyone has hand Missals and is robustly singing the Ordinary of the Mass is more of a neo-tradism than something that actually existed in typical parishes before the Council.


StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:I don't like lace mantillas or veils being paraded as "traditional" by today's American trads - unless you want to return to the Middle Ages. Even in that case, don't know how many average Europeans wore "lace."

It was rare for Europeans to wear lace until the 1500's. In the early and high medieval period, it was considered improper for married women to expose their hair, so they wore wimples or solid veils, kind of like in some Islamic societies. This wasn't just a church thing, but also for daily wear. The first women to wear their hair exposed were probably the Italians, around the 1300's. They started wearing sheer veils or netted snoods. And then you also have the elaborate headdresses and conical hats.
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8