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Full Version: My best friend makes the news: Young women still enter convents
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http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/09251/996...newspanel1

Sister Mary Elizabeth Liederbach!  Hurray!
Still? LOL.

In my medieval history classes, people talk about monasticism like the Vestal Virgins, as though it's an institution that's interesting but no longer exists.
That is wonderful!
(09-08-2009, 04:05 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]Still? LOL.

In my medieval history classes, people talk about monasticism like the Vestal Virgins, as though it's an institution that's interesting but no longer exists.

They tended to talk about most uniquely Catholic beliefs in the same tone. I thought it was strange and wondered why there were still monasteries and Catholic Churches around then why are we talking about them from ancient theories rather than just asking them in person what they believed?
(09-08-2009, 05:36 PM)WanderingPenitent Wrote: [ -> ]They tended to talk about most uniquely Catholic beliefs in the same tone. I thought it was strange and wondered why there were still monasteries and Catholic Churches around then why are we talking about them from ancient theories rather than just asking them in person what they believed?

To be fair, studying a religion in the context of history isn't the same thing as studying a contemporary religion. For example, as everyone here knows, you wouldn't get far by asking a modern-day Jew off the street about his beliefs if you wanted to know about Judaism in the time of Maimonides, much less Judaism of the Temple era. Even with the true Catholic Faith in mind, while by faith we know the doctrine is the same yesterday, today, and tomorrow..... if you asked a medieval, practicing Catholic serf about what he thought of the Papacy, or the sixth commandment, you'd get a very different answer than if you asked a modern-day, practicing Catholic blue-collar worker, even if he was a trad.

Nevertheless, it's weird to be discussing things like transubstantiation, papal authority and the like in class as if no one believed them today.
(09-08-2009, 06:13 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]Nevertheless, it's weird to be discussing things like transubstantiation, papal authority and the like in class as if no one believed them today.

And that's more what I was getting at. I understand that modern Catholicism wasn't the same, but it was not extinct either. And classes tended to treat it as such.
Part of the challenge is that many schools/universities have strict politicies against talking about modern religious practices outside of a religion class.  So, in order to teach the history, we teachers are forced to present the concepts within their historical context rather than as a living religion.  That is the price of teaching at a public school or non-Catholic institution. Sad but true.

Teaching anything about the medieval period is to walk a very fine line.  Smile
(09-08-2009, 03:59 PM)SmileBugMK Wrote: [ -> ]http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/09251/996...newspanel1

Sister Mary Elizabeth Liederbach!  Hurray!

God bless her!!!
God bless your friend SmileBugMK!  :-)
From the article:

Quote:A Vatican-ordered study is under way of conditions that may have contributed to the decline.

Any ideas, fellow Fisheaters? I don't think a study is needed at all.  In fact, it is quite obvious what conditions have contributed to the decline in vocations for women to the religious life.  Women now are "assistant priests" in nearly every parish in the US, and probably most other countries as well.