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http://nationalpost.com/news/canada/stor...id=2090938

According to this article Churches that once attracted 400-500 parishioners per Sunday Mass now bring in 40 and the only way to change this according to the rector of St Pauls Seminary and a Catholic studies professor at some Kanadian University is to copy the pentacostals " The question is how much creativity can we bring in to make the Church relevant" Fr Luc Tardis.
(10-12-2009, 08:09 PM)Baskerville Wrote: [ -> ]http://nationalpost.com/news/canada/stor...id=2090938

According to this article Churches that once attracted 400-500 parishioners per Sunday Mass now bring in 40 and the only way to change this according to the rector of St Pauls Seminary and a Catholic studies professor at some Kanadian University is to copy the pentacostals " The question is how much creativity can we bring in to make the Church relevant" Fr Luc Tardis.

The question is "when will they see the clear pattern?".

(10-12-2009, 08:22 PM)Rosarium Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-12-2009, 08:09 PM)Baskerville Wrote: [ -> ]http://nationalpost.com/news/canada/stor...id=2090938

According to this article Churches that once attracted 400-500 parishioners per Sunday Mass now bring in 40 and the only way to change this according to the rector of St Pauls Seminary and a Catholic studies professor at some Kanadian University is to copy the pentacostals " The question is how much creativity can we bring in to make the Church relevant" Fr Luc Tardis.

The question is "when will they see the clear pattern?".

It also mentions that up until the 1960's 67% of Catholics attended Mass today 14%. ???
(10-12-2009, 08:09 PM)Baskerville Wrote: [ -> ]http://nationalpost.com/news/canada/stor...id=2090938

According to this article Churches that once attracted 400-500 parishioners per Sunday Mass now bring in 40 and the only way to change this according to the rector of St Pauls Seminary and a Catholic studies professor at some Kanadian University is to copy the pentacostals " The question is how much creativity can we bring in to make the Church relevant" Fr Luc Tardis.

Interesting that all specific references to the Catholic Church are Francophones. Of course, I don't know historical figures, but I know we're still packing Churches here in Anglophone Alberta. The only Churches I know of that have been closed are isolated country parishes where the population has moved away. And, even there, it's often the case that the Roman Church closed while the Ukrainian Church stayed open or vice versa, so there's still a Catholic Church in the village.
"'Pattern?' 'There's no pattern on this wall paper.'"
(10-12-2009, 09:10 PM)DarkKnight Wrote: [ -> ]"'Pattern?' 'There's no pattern on this wall paper.'"
        :laughing:  :laughing:  :laughing:  :laughing:  :laughing: 
(10-12-2009, 08:32 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-12-2009, 08:09 PM)Baskerville Wrote: [ -> ]http://nationalpost.com/news/canada/stor...id=2090938

According to this article Churches that once attracted 400-500 parishioners per Sunday Mass now bring in 40 and the only way to change this according to the rector of St Pauls Seminary and a Catholic studies professor at some Kanadian University is to copy the pentacostals " The question is how much creativity can we bring in to make the Church relevant" Fr Luc Tardis.

Interesting that all specific references to the Catholic Church are Francophones.

I noticed that too. Last year when I was in British Columbia I went to a Mass and the Church was full. Must just be something in the Cheese eating surrender monkeys blood that makes them avoid Mass whether it in the Mother country or some other frog outpost.
(10-12-2009, 08:09 PM)Baskerville Wrote: [ -> ]http://nationalpost.com/news/canada/stor...id=2090938

According to this article Churches that once attracted 400-500 parishioners per Sunday Mass now bring in 40 and the only way to change this according to the rector of St Pauls Seminary and a Catholic studies professor at some Kanadian University is to copy the pentacostals " The question is how much creativity can we bring in to make the Church relevant" Fr Luc Tardis.

There is one thing these little Pentecostal neighborhood churches are good at, though, and that is at keeping their members busy with a bunch of social activities like Bible studies, choir practice, singles' groups, parents' groups, picnics and excursions, Wednesday night services, etc. At one time, when we still had neighborhood parishes, our people also centered their social life around their church, with processions, sodalities, cleaning committees, daily mass/holy days of obligation on weekdays, even bingo! Those constant activities are not superficial. They really do build solidarity among the parishioners and increase devotion, not to mention keeping people out of trouble. Having lived in Catholic communities most of my life, these are things I miss being a trad. Our pastor shows up once a week on Sunday (I'm lucky to have a weekly Mass to attend) and otherwise our little chapel is mostly empty. We don't even have First Saturday Mass anymore. We've been reduced to "church on Sunday" and that's about it. Even worse, many trads have to drive for hours just to get to Mass. Even if their church offered other activities, they probably couldn't attend.

I would like to be more active. I live alone so I don't even have a family nearby to associate with. In the old days people like me played an important part in the parish life.
(10-13-2009, 02:15 AM)il_lebbroso Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-12-2009, 08:09 PM)Baskerville Wrote: [ -> ]http://nationalpost.com/news/canada/stor...id=2090938

According to this article Churches that once attracted 400-500 parishioners per Sunday Mass now bring in 40 and the only way to change this according to the rector of St Pauls Seminary and a Catholic studies professor at some Kanadian University is to copy the pentacostals " The question is how much creativity can we bring in to make the Church relevant" Fr Luc Tardis.

There is one thing these little Pentecostal neighborhood churches are good at, though, and that is at keeping their members busy with a bunch of social activities like Bible studies, choir practice, singles' groups, parents' groups, picnics and excursions, Wednesday night services, etc. At one time, when we still had neighborhood parishes, our people also centered their social life around their church, with processions, sodalities, cleaning committees, daily mass/holy days of obligation on weekdays, even bingo! Those constant activities are not superficial. They really do build solidarity among the parishioners and increase devotion, not to mention keeping people out of trouble. Having lived in Catholic communities most of my life, these are things I miss being a trad. Our pastor shows up once a week on Sunday (I'm lucky to have a weekly Mass to attend) and otherwise our little chapel is mostly empty. We don't even have First Saturday Mass anymore. We've been reduced to "church on Sunday" and that's about it. Even worse, many trads have to drive for hours just to get to Mass. Even if their church offered other activities, they probably couldn't attend.

I would like to be more active. I live alone so I don't even have a family nearby to associate with. In the old days people like me played an important part in the parish life.

Thats very true though my old NO pastor said that processions, vigils, and holy days are all middle ages things that we dont need anymore. As usual hes wrong.
(10-13-2009, 02:15 AM)il_lebbroso Wrote: [ -> ]I would like to be more active. I live alone so I don't even have a family nearby to associate with. In the old days people like me played an important part in the parish life.

My usual parish has a similar problem. If you're a single, 20-something parishioner with no family, there's pretty much nothing to do and no one particularly interested in talking to you. There is actually a fair amount of activities, but they usually revolve around the K-12 school attached to the parish, so one needs to be either a student, parent or employee to really be a part of the club. The ones that don't, are all attended by people over 40.

The only thing I can conclude from all that is that the church actually expects you to go sow your wild oats once you reach college age until you have kids to enroll in the school.
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