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Hey everyone! I need some help for latin class please (this helps me in the long run so pelase contriubte if you know any latin):

Nam quod quisque populus ipse sibi ius constituit, id ipsius proprium est vocaturque ius civile, quasi ius proprium civitatis
What does this mean please?
For because a certain people themselves (quisque populus ipse) institutes (constituit) law for themselves (sibi), it (id, matching ius in number and gender) is a particular thing (proprium) of themselves (ipsius, matching populus) and is called civil law (ius civile), or so to say (quasi) the particular law of the state.
thnx man. This stuff is hard and I am trying desperately to be a latinist
Euclid said to Ptolemy, "There is no royal road to geometry." There's no royal road to Latin either. Know your declensions, your conjugations, and constructions because without a firm knowledge of fundamentals, it is impossible to progress steadily. More than anything, I think it is important to trust the grammar, trust the cases, and actually take it for what it says, rather than imposing a meaning on the words within context. It is easy to gleam, but it is not fulfilling.

I find it very helpful to have memorized the 1,000 most common Latin words, which I think brings you to around 60% of the vocabulary of a text or so. There was an electronic list, but I can't seem to find it. Doing some searching for it, it looks like a scholar by the name of J. Wilson assembled about the same amount of words into his Basic Latin Vocabulary.

For anything beyond the most basic level, you're going to consult a good grammar reference (not Wheelock). The standard reference grammars in English are Allen and Greenough and Gildersleeve and Lodge. Allen and Greenough's grammar is online on the Perseus project. Recently published in paperback is a very lucid grammar of which I am very fond by an author who takes a very modern approach: Dirk Panhuis' Latin Grammar. G.S. Woodcock's A New Latin Syntax is a great reference for constructions, and should be on any nightstand because it will either put you to sleep or keep you up with excitement, depending on your mood.

If this is your first encounter with Latin, you needn't run off and buy a grammar, but you should be aware of them, and you should probably peek in them to look at full treatments of certain things.
(10-13-2009, 11:13 PM)BlessedKarl Wrote: [ -> ]Hey everyone! I need some help for latin class please (this helps me in the long run so pelase contriubte if you know any latin):

Nam quod quisque populus ipse sibi ius constituit, id ipsius proprium est vocaturque ius civile, quasi ius proprium civitatis
What does this mean please?
 

  Look up each word in the Latin dictionary.  One of the best ways to learn the language.
(10-14-2009, 01:16 AM)Cyriacus Wrote: [ -> ]I find it very helpful to have memorized the 1,000 most common Latin words, which I think brings you to around 60% of the vocabulary of a text or so. There was an electronic list, but I can't seem to find it. Doing some searching for it, it looks like a scholar by the name of J. Wilson assembled about the same amount of words into his Basic Latin Vocabulary.
Here is a list of the 300 most common Latin words: http://www.inrebus.com/latinwords.php

I am against memorising anything. I recommend one know it, not memorise it. When it comes to language, we should be able to read/write/speak/understand it, not recall it from a mental list. To know something, one must use it in some way, and these means reading a lot (for Latin usually).


Quote:G.S. Woodcock's A New Latin Syntax is a great reference for constructions, and should be on any nightstand because it will either put you to sleep or keep you up with excitement, depending on your mood.
I'll look for that. I have A Primer of Ecclesiastical Latin and it seems to be very good as well.

And I do keep it near where I sleep (no nightstand or bed for me), but it keeps me up normally. I do not know what mood I'm usually in. I'd like to think subjunctive, but people think I'm weird.

(10-14-2009, 12:47 PM)Rosarium Wrote: [ -> ]I do not know what mood I'm usually in. I'd like to think subjunctive, but people think I'm weird.
:laughing: :laughing: :laughing:
(10-14-2009, 12:47 PM)Rosarium Wrote: [ -> ]I am against memorising anything. I recommend one know it, not memorise it. When it comes to language, we should be able to read/write/speak/understand it, not recall it from a mental list. To know something, one must use it in some way, and these means reading a lot (for Latin usually).

I respectfully disagree.  I have Spanish, German, French, Russian, Latin, and some basic Japanese & Italian under my belt.  It is simply not possible to get started without memorizing at least basic vocabulary.  In most cases, the memorization of some basic rules is also a necessity for even forming coherent sentences.  Once this is achieved, then practice takes over, as you say.

By analogy.....Baltimore Catechism vs. post V2 CCD ("Cut, Color, & Draw")......did kids learn more hard facts memorizing catechetical responses or by "experiencing God's love" with glue & contsruction paper?

I speak from over 30 years experience in learning language, and several years earning my living as a translator & interpreter.
(10-14-2009, 06:54 PM)DesperatelySeeking Wrote: [ -> ]I respectfully disagree.  I have Spanish, German, French, Russian, Latin, and some basic Japanese & Italian under my belt.  It is simply not possible to get started without memorizing at least basic vocabulary.  In most cases, the memorization of some basic rules is also a necessity for even forming coherent sentences.  Once this is achieved, then practice takes over, as you say.

I speak from over 30 years experience in learning language, and several years earning my living as a translator & interpreter.
I didn't mean memorisation as a whole is out, just that memorising a list of 1000 Latin words is probably not the best way.