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Hello everyone. In my hopes of learning the honourable latin tongue I have run into a sort of quagmire. I wish to know how to translate the following please:

Hic venerabile Cluniacensium plus priscis partribus ditat Coenobium. Illius studio crevit religio, Crevit et numerus fratrum collegio. Hanc domum Dominus rebus amplificat

thankyou! :-[ :)
(11-06-2009, 07:30 PM)BlessedKarl Wrote: [ -> ]Hello everyone. In my hopes of learning the honourable latin tongue I have run into a sort of quagmire. I wish to know how to translate the following please:

Hic venerabile Cluniacensium plus priscis partribus ditat Coenobium. Illius studio crevit religio, Crevit et numerus fratrum collegio. Hanc domum Dominus rebus amplificat

thankyou! :-[ :)

The first word means:  "This."  :owl:
:o oh dear...I thought I knew some Latin from school but the only word I can get is the first word and "Lord" in the last sentence....
It is a bit tricky!

Hic venerabile Cluniacensium plus priscis partribus ditat Coenobium. Illius studio crevit religio, Crevit et numerus fratrum collegio. Hanc domum Dominus rebus amplificat

It takes a good while to get used to Latin's funky word-order even in fairly simple sentences (not to deride your efforts but wait til you try Tacitus!  It's great to start out with stuff like this though).  You have to train yourself to hold onto the multiple meanings of a word at once without immediately jumping to one or the other.

Here's the translation though:

"Here the venerable monastery of the Cluniacs was much enriched by the ancient Fathers [that is, the Church Fathers].  Their faith flourished by the study of them, as did the number of brothers in their company.  The Lord increases this house in wealth."

"Hic" means "here", obviously - a bit tricky, you have to get used to seeing "hic" and knowing that it could mean "this" or "here" depending on context

venerabile = neuter of venerabilis, which means "venerable" and modifies Coenobium

Cluniacensium = genitive plural of "Cluniacensis" - "Cluniac"

plus = could be an adjective but it can also be an adverb meaning "very" and I think that's its force in this selection

priscis patribus = ablative of "ancient fathers" ("partribus" is either a typo or error in the manuscript)

ditat = enriched

Coenobium - subject of the sentence, means monastery

The rest of it isn't too bad, notice that "illius" is in the singular but is used to refer to the whole "thing" of studying the Church Fathers; also notice that either through scribal error or the intention of the author "in" is missing from in front of "collegio" - you can do that.  I also translated "amplificat" as a present tense but it's also possible that it was the "past sense of the present", much more frequent in Latin than English - so, for example, we might say "Well I'm going to the store and then I see this guy running down the street naked!", even though we're narrating a past event, and this is done in Latin as well for emphasis.  What text is this, by the way?  Same dealio with "ditat", I left it in the past since that makes the most sense in context, what with "crevit" in the next clause . . . I probably should have done the same with amplificat, but oh well :)

Hope I helped, correct me if I'm wrong anyone.
(11-06-2009, 09:30 PM)John92 Wrote: [ -> ]It is a bit tricky!

Hic venerabile Cluniacensium plus priscis partribus ditat Coenobium. Illius studio crevit religio, Crevit et numerus fratrum collegio. Hanc domum Dominus rebus amplificat

It takes a good while to get used to Latin's funky word-order even in fairly simple sentences (not to deride your efforts but wait til you try Tacitus!  It's great to start out with stuff like this though).  You have to train yourself to hold onto the multiple meanings of a word at once without immediately jumping to one or the other.

Here's the translation though:

"Here the venerable monastery of the Cluniacs was much enriched by the ancient Fathers [that is, the Church Fathers].  Their faith flourished by the study of them, as did the number of brothers in their company.  The Lord increases this house in wealth."

"Hic" means "here", obviously - a bit tricky, you have to get used to seeing "hic" and knowing that it could mean "this" or "here" depending on context

venerabile = neuter of venerabilis, which means "venerable" and modifies Coenobium

Cluniacensium = genitive plural of "Cluniacensis" - "Cluniac"

plus = could be an adjective but it can also be an adverb meaning "very" and I think that's its force in this selection

priscis patribus = ablative of "ancient fathers" ("partribus" is either a typo or error in the manuscript)

ditat = enriched

Coenobium - subject of the sentence, means monastery

The rest of it isn't too bad, notice that "illius" is in the singular but is used to refer to the whole "thing" of studying the Church Fathers; also notice that either through scribal error or the intention of the author "in" is missing from in front of "collegio" - you can do that.

Hope I helped, correct me if I'm wrong anyone.

That deserves a fish!
That deserves another,
+1
tim
The first word means:  "This."   :owl:
[/quote]

"Hic" is the very first word I learned in Latin. We learned, "Hic est charta", which means "here is a map".

Anytime we were caught not knowing the translation to any phrase, my classmates and I would respond with "Hic est charta"!

I'll need to get back to you on the rest...
(11-06-2009, 11:13 PM)FidemScit Wrote: [ -> ]The first word means:  "This."   :owl:

"Hic" is the very first word I learned in Latin. We learned, "Hic est charta", which means "here is a map".

Anytime we were caught not knowing the translation to any phrase, my classmates and I would respond with "Hic est charta"!

I'll need to get back to you on the rest...

[/quote]

i think the first thing we learned was 'america est patria mea.'  'brittania est insula' was an early one, too.

welcome to FE, you have a great avatar.  i miss 'father guido sarducci.'

(11-06-2009, 09:30 PM)John92 Wrote: [ -> ]Hope I helped, correct me if I'm wrong anyone.

You're way too modest. It was a joy reading your explanation!

"Marcus et Cornelia in horto ambulant" was the first sentence I learned in Latin. The two of them encountered a snake there ("Heu, heu, serpentem video!""). Now whats the name of that book where, also in one of the very first chapters if I'm not mistaken, some couple meet a snake....