FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums

Full Version: Persecution in Egypt Ongoing as Copts Plead for Help
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Long live the crusades. We need another one.
(11-24-2009, 07:14 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: [ -> ]Long live the crusades. We need another one.
:amen:
A Crusade is a war I'd sign up for Deus Volt!!
I learned recently that Egypt was majority Christian into the 10th century or so. Attrition by conversion was a gradual process. These are the steadfast among the steadfast, and how tragic it is that they are equally obstinate in schism! Pray for the union of the Copts within the Catholic Church, and that all this blood be a seed for the growth of holiness, just as it was in the same place so long ago.
(11-24-2009, 08:53 PM)Cyriacus Wrote: [ -> ]I learned recently that Egypt was majority Christian into the 10th century or so. Attrition by conversion was a gradual process. These are the steadfast among the steadfast, and how tragic it is that they are equally obstinate in schism! Pray for the union of the Copts within the Catholic Church, and that all this blood be a seed for the growth of holiness, just as it was in the same place so long ago.

while it is difficult to determine population and composition back then, it is probably that the majority was Christian as late as the 13th century in Egypt as well as Palestine.  However, when Egypt was first conquered by the Arabs, there were many heretical groups operating in Egypt.  In fact, Egypt was easily conquered because an influential bishop surrendered the army because he decided that the Arabs would be more favorable with him than the Byzantine emperor.  Same thing happened in Spain as well where the local ruler of Ceuta (the main port between Fez and Spain) had an axe to pick with the Visigothic king of Spain, so he allowed the muslims to come in.  I like to think that the "brilliance" of Islamic civilization was not based on the merits of Islam but that the muslims had to be moderate in their administration of their conquered land similar to the Persian model of antiquity, but as the population become more islamized the "brilliance" seemed to disappear.
Indeed, and according to Ferdinand Braudel, Latin was spoken in Tunisia up until the 17th Century.