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(12-19-2009, 02:58 AM)St.Ambrose Wrote: [ -> ]but  I will always Obey.LOL

Obey what? Who says you cant go to the SSPX's Masses?
(12-19-2009, 07:57 AM)matthew_talbot Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-19-2009, 02:26 AM)St.Ambrose Wrote: [ -> ]Is everyone here from the SSPX????  ???

Yes...And we're taking over the world!!!!

;D ;D ;D
NOPE, but they should be  ;D
Its a common misconception hat we are against the Pope....wrong group of crazies, your thinking sedes maybe..
(12-19-2009, 10:56 AM)CanadianCatholic Wrote: [ -> ]NOPE, but they should be  ;D
Its a common misconception hat we are against the Pope....wrong group of crazies, your thinking sedes maybe..

So you admit that you're crazy.  Maybe I should go to an SSPX chapel.

Hey Scipio, what do you mean when you say that the SSPX does full Catechesis?  What's the venue, and what do they teach from?  Do you just mean sermons from the Catechism of the Council of Trent or what? 
(12-19-2009, 11:14 AM)JonW Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-19-2009, 10:56 AM)CanadianCatholic Wrote: [ -> ]NOPE, but they should be  ;D
Its a common misconception hat we are against the Pope....wrong group of crazies, your thinking sedes maybe..

So you admit that you're crazy.  Maybe I should go to an SSPX chapel.

Hey Scipio, what do you mean when you say that the SSPX does full Catechesis?  What's the venue, and what do they teach from?  Do you just mean sermons from the Catechism of the Council of Trent or what? 
Hey, ifyou cant laugh at yourself once in a while, life is pretty boring
Scipio,

  Count me as one who assists regularly at CMRI Masses and those with similiar theogical positions.  

   Joe
(12-19-2009, 11:14 AM)JonW Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-19-2009, 10:56 AM)CanadianCatholic Wrote: [ -> ]NOPE, but they should be  ;D
Its a common misconception hat we are against the Pope....wrong group of crazies, your thinking sedes maybe..

So you admit that you're crazy.  Maybe I should go to an SSPX chapel.

Hey Scipio, what do you mean when you say that the SSPX does full Catechesis?  What's the venue, and what do they teach from?  Do you just mean sermons from the Catechism of the Council of Trent or what? 

I can't speak for Scipio, but I can tell you the venue that was used when I converted through an SSPX chapel 2 -1/2 years ago. There were two of us receiving instruction for conversion, and the priest has us read a chapter or two every week from a book called, 'A Brief Catechism for Adults,' by Fr. William J. Cogan. Then he would meet with us after Mass, and go over the chapter, question by question, and elaborate and explain many of the points in greater detail. He would then ask us questions to see if we had properly understood what was being taught. And we were able to ask questions, too. I really enjoyed these lessons. Not only was the priest well-versed in Thomistic theology, but he had a great sense of humor - so we laughed a lot, too.

The second half of the book was covered by my sponsor, who is a longtime attender at the chapel, and very devout. We would also meet with the priest occasionally so he could make sure we had understood the important points in the book. I'm very grateful for the instruction I reveived from the SSPX.

Here's an online version of the book that was used, and it can be gone through and read page by page:

http://www.olrl.org/Lessons/

The local FSSP parish here also does catechesis for adults, which is taught personally by the priest.
(12-19-2009, 03:08 AM)Scipio_a Wrote: [ -> ]The reason your being told that on the other thread is that many FSSP and probably all EF are not allowed to give you catechesis (they do RCIA)....the SSPX gives full catechisis

Just as a point of information, the term Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA) refers to the process rather than the content.

In the recent centuries pre VII, if an adult wanted to join the Church they would: (A) In a large parish, sign up for a periodic Inquirers Class, almost invariable taught by the youngest Associate Pastor on staff, and would follow up with some one-on-one sessions with a priest; or (B) in a smaller parish, they would make an appointment with the priest and have a series of one-on-one catechism classes.  Typically, from what I remember people who went through this process saying, in most cases the classes involved 10 - 12 sessions, typically once a week.  In my area of the Northwest Father Smith Instructs Jackson (widely distributed a little or no cost by the Knights of Columbus Religious Information Bureau) seemed to be a common catechism used.  The Baltimore Catechism  The Faith of Millions by Fr. John A. O'Brien, published by Our Sunday Visitor Press in 1938, and The Faith of Our Fathers by Cardinal Gibbons were also popular.  When the candidate made the decision to join the Church they would be baptized at a private ceremony with just family and their sponsors.  They would make their First Communion at the next Sunday or daily Mass, and would be confirmed the next time the Bishop came to town to confirm children (though I recall reading once that in large Archdioceses there might be a special confirmation ceremony for adult converts once or twice a year at the Cathedral).

In the RCIA process, designed to emulate what had been the earlier tradition of the Church, weekly classes begin in the Fall (most parishes in my area run ads in the local paper) and continue through Lent, with the candidates receiving baptism (if they haven’t been validly baptized) confirmation, and First Communion at the Easter Vigil Mass.  Their instructional classes often continue on through the end of the “Religious Ed year” – usually mid to late May.  Each parish decides which catechetical materials to use, and while there was some variety to the process in the past, I’m sure it’s more so today.  The classes may be taught by a priest, by a deacon, if the parish has one (that seems to be a common assignment for permanent deacons in my area), a large parish may have a full time adult Rel. Ed. person, or a team approach may be taken.  In a former parish RCIA was being taught by the new associate pastor who had gone to the North American College in Rome.  He was a young priest who was old skool in a refreshing way – he taught classes wearing a cassock, and regularly handed out holy cards.  He randomly asked me to teach a class on sacramentals (why I was selected in particular I have no idea).  He would have a couple with a particularly great marriage teach that section, and someone from the St. Vincent DePaul group teach the Corporal Works of Mercy.  Unfortunately I have a suspicion that most RCIA programs don’t even mention sacramentals, or the corporal and spiritual works of mercy.

Another aspect that is different with RCIA is that in most parishes the sponsors are encouraged (or even required in some) to attend the classes.  From what I’ve seen there is no one-on-one session with a priest, unless a candidate asks for one and makes an appointment, but it’s not part of the process.  The idea is that the sponsor does the one-on-one coaching.

My point is, just for the sake of being …. retentive ;D that to say Inquirers / Catechism Class good, RCIA bad is a bit over simplified, as those terms refer more to the process than the content.

(12-19-2009, 02:26 AM)St.Ambrose Wrote: [ -> ]Is everyone here from the SSPX????  ???

I'm not.
For me, it has been a process, I was always a conservative Catholic, and in time that led me to becoming an EF goer.  I started going to FSSP whenever I could, but I was honestly scared to death of the SSPX.  As I've learned and grown, I'm at the point now where I'd go to SSPX exclusively if I could.  But for now I just go to my Diocesan EF Mass.  Not sure how that is going to sustain itself though, since the average age there is about 80.  I'm only 32, with my wife and 5 kids, we are in the youngest 5% for sure.

Anyway, sometimes I dont like how hard we come down on "neo-con" Catholics here, since that is where I started as well, and I think being a conservative Catholic is a good first step toward Traditionalism.
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