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(01-01-2010, 02:50 PM)alaric Wrote: [ -> ]I don't know if that is necessarily true, from what I understand, Hinduism is not just a religious faith, it is very much tied into the culture, heritage, language, and even the race on the subcontinent.Hinduism can be very much nationalistic with religion tied into race and the land within from which it originated. It some aspects, it can be very similar to Judaism or even Zionism.

To many Hindu's, converting can be a betrayal to everything from which they originated from.

That is true. Hindus can also be extremely...fickle.

"Hindu" actually was just a term for what we now call Indian, Pakistani, Nepali and others from the subcontinent. As a religious term, it just refers to religions which have a few ancient texts as their scriptures to a degree (not all are accepted by all Hindus).

The Hindu attacks are very horrific against Christians when they happen in India. Often, the tension is between Muslims and Hindus (being more common) so that makes the news more.
(01-01-2010, 11:53 AM)anamchara Wrote: [ -> ]This is an interesting post, Alaric.  My list follows: 

3. Latter Day Saints to Catholic

I also believe someone converting from the JWs or Mormonism would face more severe shunning from family and friends than someone converting from Islam.  The Church is the Whore of Babylon as far as those flaky unitarian cultists are concerned. 

I was raised in a very strict and devout Mormon family (my father held the equivalent position of a Bishop for 12 years).  It is true that Mormons view the Church of Rome as the whore of Babylon;  they also call her "the great and abominable church."  However, this is not an official official position, just the standard interpretation that basically everyone accepts, because from the Mormon point of view Christ's church was on the earth and then the entire thing went apostate and truth/authority was lost until Joseph Smith.

Even so, I don't think it is overly hard for Mormons to convert to Catholicism.  My father even told me, "well, either we're right or you're right, but no one else has a claim."  From their point of view either the Church of Rome lost the authority, in which case Mormonism picked it up, or it didn't.  Other Christian denominations don't figure in.  I think it would have been harder for my father to understand if I had gone to a protestant denomination or to a non-Christian religion because of this.  In any case, leaving the Mormon church is hard to do, because it is so much a part of a Mormon family's culture and identity.  My family and I had to work through alot of things to get to the good place we are with each other now.

Pax vobiscum,
Jesse
(01-01-2010, 03:04 PM)JayneK Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-01-2010, 12:50 PM)Rosarium Wrote: [ -> ]I think it highly depends on the situation.

Any origin can be a problem.

I agree.  I'm not sure how possible it is to compare the generalities.  Personally, I had an easy time with my conversion.

what were you before your conversion?  if you said on p. 1, i don't recall.

I think there are several questions being asked in this thread, not just one.

One is:

-what is the relative ease of conversion to the doctrines and practices of the Catholic Church from whatever the convert once believed and did,

and another:

-how difficult is the social transition from the old group of co-believers to the new group?  Which group is likely to retaliate and also, which convert is likely to be less easily accepted by other Catholics?

alaric,

you left out a letter in the header, making it unintentionally funny -- to me at least.

would COVERTED Catholics be those who became Catholic secretly (covertly)?    ;D

[i know you know how to spell convert, it was just a typo, and i don't ordinarily call people's attentions to their typos but this one made me laugh. no insult intended.]

believe me, i considered covert conversion in the early sixties but back then i doubt any priest would have assisted a 16 year-old  to enter the Church against the family's opposition.

i think a lot depends on your family, not your former faith, though that's certainly involved, too.  my parents were just mainline presbies but very anti-Catholic.  that made me suspicious early on because i observed Catholic neighbors who were very nice and did not seem to worship idols or the pope.

there are possibly nominal jews and muslims who wouldn't be too upset by a child's conversion; they wouldn't like it but they wouldn't disown or kill them.  but i may be wrong. 

anyway, protestant to Catholic is not generally easy for anyone, because of family and, often, friends.



(01-01-2010, 01:34 PM)Rosarium Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-01-2010, 01:25 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: [ -> ]Interesting.

However, did the muslim community get behind this man and sanctioned his actions? Perhaps his daughter was not really an apostate (yet).
Probably. Most Muslims cannot condemn suicide bombers (even on civilians) when they are pressed. However, they are also clever and will distance themselves from anything if they feel it would be in their best interest at the time. If they are in Britain, it is all "religious freedom" and "respect" openly. Once they get a high enough population, to hell with everyone else and they do as they please.

You can say the same about your average American, whether "Christian" or secularist, when it comes to, say, the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.  Here's the secular Jewish American Jon Stewart reluctantly condemning the bombings on his show.  Of course, he later issued a groveling retraction, presumably under pressure from his network.      



The Good War jihadists are very clever and will distance themselves from Christian just war principles if they feel it would be in their best interest at the time.  If they are in the U.S., it's all about "revenge" for the attack on Pearl Harbor (which FDR provoked and of which he had foreknowledge) and "respect" for the American fighting man, who otherwise would have had to invade Japan, because FDR and Truman insisted on Japan's unconditional surrender rather than a negotiated settlement.  
(01-01-2010, 07:12 PM)i.p.i. Wrote: [ -> ]alaric,

you left out a letter in the header, making it unintentionally funny -- to me at least.

would COVERTED Catholics be those who became Catholic secretly (covertly)?    ;D

[i know you know how to spell convert, it was just a typo, and i don't ordinarily call people's attentions to their typos but this one made me laugh. no insult intended.]

believe me, i considered covert conversion in the early sixties but back then i doubt any priest would have assisted a 16 year-old  to enter the Church against the family's opposition.

i think a lot depends on your family, not your former faith, though that's certainly involved, too.  my parents were just mainline presbies but very anti-Catholic.  that made me suspicious early on because i observed Catholic neighbors who were very nice and did not seem to worship idols or the pope.

there are possibly nominal jews and muslims who wouldn't be too upset by a child's conversion; they wouldn't like it but they wouldn't disown or kill them.  but i may be wrong. 

anyway, protestant to Catholic is not generally easy for anyone, because of family and, often, friends.

I lived in Dearborn, Michigan for several years.  Dearborn has one of the largest Muslim communities in the United States.  There are also plenty of Jews in the metropolitan Detroit area.  In my limited experience, a nominal Jew has more issues with Christianity than does a nominal Muslim.  To that extent, converting from Judaism to Christianity is more difficult than converting from Islam to Christianity.  Again, this is based on my limited experience and my possibly distorted impressions.   
(01-01-2010, 07:12 PM)i.p.i. Wrote: [ -> ]alaric,

you left out a letter in the header, making it unintentionally funny -- to me at least.

would COVERTED Catholics be those who became Catholic secretly (covertly)?    ;D

[i know you know how to spell convert, it was just a typo, and i don't ordinarily call people's attentions to their typos but this one made me laugh. no insult intended.]

believe me, i considered covert conversion in the early sixties but back then i doubt any priest would have assisted a 16 year-old  to enter the Church against the family's opposition.

i think a lot depends on your family, not your former faith, though that's certainly involved, too.  my parents were just mainline presbies but very anti-Catholic.  that made me suspicious early on because i observed Catholic neighbors who were very nice and did not seem to worship idols or the pope.

there are possibly nominal jews and muslims who wouldn't be too upset by a child's conversion; they wouldn't like it but they wouldn't disown or kill them.  but i may be wrong. 

anyway, protestant to Catholic is not generally easy for anyone, because of family and, often, friends.
Ha! Good one! Fixxed it.

But you're right, I will start another thread sometime about covert Catholics...... :sneaky:
(01-01-2010, 08:07 PM)alaric Wrote: [ -> ][quote='i.p.i.' pid='495550' dateline='1262387568']

alaric,

you left out a letter in the header, making it unintentionally funny -- to me at least.



But you're right, I will start another thread sometime about covert Catholics...... :sneaky:

Oh, that reminds me, I want to watch the movie "Boondock Saints"  :popcorn:
(01-01-2010, 08:07 PM)alaric Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-01-2010, 07:12 PM)i.p.i. Wrote: [ -> ]alaric,

you left out a letter in the header, making it unintentionally funny -- to me at least.

would COVERTED Catholics be those who became Catholic secretly (covertly)?    ;D

[i know you know how to spell convert, it was just a typo, and i don't ordinarily call people's attentions to their typos but this one made me laugh. no insult intended.]

believe me, i considered covert conversion in the early sixties but back then i doubt any priest would have assisted a 16 year-old  to enter the Church against the family's opposition.

i think a lot depends on your family, not your former faith, though that's certainly involved, too.  my parents were just mainline presbies but very anti-Catholic.  that made me suspicious early on because i observed Catholic neighbors who were very nice and did not seem to worship idols or the pope.

there are possibly nominal jews and muslims who wouldn't be too upset by a child's conversion; they wouldn't like it but they wouldn't disown or kill them.  but i may be wrong. 

anyway, protestant to Catholic is not generally easy for anyone, because of family and, often, friends.
Ha! Good one! Fixxed it.

But you're right, I will start another thread sometime about covert Catholics...... :sneaky:

i wonder how many coverts there are…  i was hiding k of c pamphlets about doctrine in my room the way other teenagers were hiding dirty books  :laughing:

i like to say i'm a cradle Catholic since i spent my first two weeks in a Catholic cradle, at St. Joseph's hospital. 

a friend who really is cradle Catholic and a few years older than i am says the sisters probably baptized me in secret.  i can see the logic of them doing that if they believed a baby's soul would be lost, as they would if they knew the parents were prots.  back then they really believed EENS.  so i may have been baptized twice as an infant, but, if so, the Catholics got there first.  i like the thought, though my parents would have been outraged.

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