FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums

Full Version: No Solemnity in California
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Pages: 1 2 3 4
I know that many novus ordo parishes do not plan for this and some other holy days of obligation; what is your experience?
 
http://calcatholic.com/news/newsArticle....1c92ac17e1



Published: January 1, 2010

“Not celebrated”
Though today is holy day of obligation, California Catholics exempt from duty to attend Mass




Today the Church celebrates the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God, a holy day of obligation in the United States. But Catholics in California have been dispensed by their bishops from the obligation to attend Mass.

The Diocese of Stockton’s Dec. 23, 2009 “Friday Diocesan Update” explained it this way: “Bishop Blair has dispensed the faithful from the obligation to attend Mass on Friday, January 1, 2010. The Solemnity of Mary, the Mother of God, remains a holy day.”

Says an item on the website of the Los Angeles archdiocese’s Office for Worship, “In the dioceses of the California province (including the Archdiocese of Los Angeles), the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God (January 1) is not celebrated as a holy day of obligation.”

The San Francisco archdiocesan website says, “Archbishop George H. Niederauer has determined that, in accord with the practice of neighboring dioceses, the obligation to attend Mass on Jan. 1, 2010, the Solemnity of Mary, the Mother of God is dispensed.”

The Sacramento diocesan website carried this note following a list of holy days of obligation: “Bishop Soto has determined that, in accord with the other dioceses of the province of northern?California, the obligation to attend Mass on January 1, 2010, the Solemnity of Mary, the Mother of God, is dispensed for the Diocese of Sacramento.”

Other than explaining that the dispensation is “in accord with” the practice in other California dioceses, none of the diocesan websites answers the question, “Why?”

In December 1991, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops approved a list of holy days of obligation in the United States. The list was accepted by the Vatican in the summer of 1992, and took effect on Jan. 1, 1993.

The decree, still in effect, lists the following holy days of obligation for Catholics in the United States: January 1, the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God; Thursday of the Sixth Week of Easter, the Solemnity of the Ascension; August 15, the Solemnity of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary; November 1, the Solemnity of All Saints; December 8, the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception; and December 25, the Solemnity of the Nativity of Our Lord Jesus Christ.

The decree provided for three exceptions: “Whenever January 1, the solemnity of Mary, Mother of God, or August 15, the solemnity of the Assumption, or November 1, the solemnity of All Saints, falls on a Saturday or on a Monday, the precept to attend Mass is abrogated.”

But today is a Friday -- not a Saturday or a Monday – so why the exception in California? “It’s nothing really sinister,” a former priest of the Los Angeles archdiocese told California Catholic Daily. "It’s really pretty mundane – for the convenience of the lay people.”




(01-02-2010, 10:24 PM)Magdalene Wrote: [ -> ]"It’s really pretty mundane – for the convenience of the lay people.”
Yeah...that's what lay people need, MORE convenience ::) Give me a freaking break, this is a joke. I guess they figured it would be easier to dispense than to look around in the empty churches and say 'where is everyone'. I guess if nobodys going to pay attention to the obligation we may as well just through it out the window.
Yeah, that's sad and inexcusable, in my opinion.
It's not a day of obligation down here in Orange County, and only about half of the NO churches I looked at even mentioned it, and none of those had any special services which differed from their standard weekly schedules. The only exception was the parish I attend-- St. John the Baptist-- which is run by the Norbertines.  They had extra NO masses and even a High TLM. In the sermon last Sunday, they just stressed that "it would be good" if people made a point to attend, however the priest didn't get into the history or it and how it used to be a day of obligation.
Magdalene Wrote:"It’s really pretty mundane – for the convenience of the lay people.”

One should not be too critical concerning the above statement.

This is not fifty, or one hundred, or one thousand years ago. Ours is not a Christian culture. Employers demand that their workers be available to labor from Sunday - Saturday.* This is wrong and unjust. Employers and societies which prevent their workers from attending divine worship will answer for such on the Last Day.** Nonetheless, economic constraints oftentimes oblige Christians to work on Feast days in order to put food on the table. I reckon this to be especially the case in California. Foremen there are especially exploitative of the Spanish-speaking believers. 

Reluctant to tie heavy burdens to the backs of men (cf. Mt. 23:4), perhaps the bishops of California have dispensed with the mandatory worship as a mercy to those believers caught in an economic machine far too demanding of souls created in God's image, but far too real as well.



*Opps, we can't have the Lord's Day kick-off the week anymore. Make that Monday - Sunday,
** Given the current depression, however, perhaps we need not wait until Judgment Day to see God’s chastisement discipline mankind. 
They could still make it a day of solemnity in the parish and offer an extra evening Mass like they do on the other days of obligation, if they desired.
Sorcha Wrote:They could still make it a day of solemnity in the parish and offer an extra evening Mass like they do on the other days of obligation, if they desired.

That would be nice, as would an official explanation of the diocese's logic. I was just offering an explanation of a development beyond, "Uh, can you believe what the 'Novus Ordo' is doing now?" bit.
Why ???? everyone works. There is enough Mass times so everyone has chance to attend. If its an obligation you should attend. everyone has an excuse
(01-03-2010, 12:32 AM)Credo Wrote: [ -> ]
Sorcha Wrote:They could still make it a day of solemnity in the parish and offer an extra evening Mass like they do on the other days of obligation, if they desired.

That would be nice, as would an official explanation of the diocese's logic. I was just offering an explanation of a development beyond, "Uh, can you believe what the 'Novus Ordo' is doing now?" bit.

I like your attempts to develop the explanation further, too, I guess I'm just more cynical in that I don't really see a good reason (i.e. compassion for the working man).  But, I can definitely concur with you that the problem lies beyond the Novus Ordo.  I mean, I believe Modernism (and Postmodernism) is just a fact of our culture and it affects everyone.  It's the water that fills the fishbowl that we swim in.  We know that the main philosophy of Modernism is Pragmatism and Materialism; to devalue things and behaviors which don't have an immediate "point" or material benefit.  The dirty little secret, from my experience, is that it infects the traditional camp nearly as much as the Novus Ordo.  Here in Cali, only a fraction of the people who attend TLM on Sunday made it for the solemnity yesterday. Lukewarmness is a sign of the times. It's hard to maintain zeal in this postmodern world. 

All the more reason parishes should be offering as many Masses as possible on holy days, though, if you ask me.  But then again, our priesthood swims in the same fish bowl.
(01-02-2010, 11:45 PM)Sorcha Wrote: [ -> ]It's not a day of obligation down here in Orange County, and only about half of the NO churches I looked at even mentioned it, and none of those had any special services which differed from their standard weekly schedules. The only exception was the parish I attend-- St. John the Baptist-- which is run by the Norbertines.  They had extra NO masses and even a High TLM. In the sermon last Sunday, they just stressed that "it would be good" if people made a point to attend, however the priest didn't get into the history or it and how it used to be a day of obligation.

Haha.  My fiance and I attended the TLM at SJB...we thought it was a holy day of obligation, though.
Pages: 1 2 3 4