FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums

Full Version: Two dozen US bishops could retire in 2010 Cardinals Rigali, Law to reach age 75
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
I don't like painting in overly broad strokes, but it's hard to see this as a bad thing. Many of these 'shepherds' are in dire need of replacement. Hopefully His Holiness appoints holy Bishops to replace them!

http://www.georgiabulletin.org/world/2010/01/04/US-1/

Quote:Two dozen U.S. bishops could retire for age reasons in 2010

Published:

WASHINGTON (CNS) -- Up to 24 U.S. bishops, including two cardinals, could retire because of age this year. There are 11 active U.S. bishops, including one cardinal, who have already turned 75. Thirteen more will celebrate their 75th birthday in 2010. At age 75 bishops are requested to submit their resignation to the pope. Cardinal Bernard F. Law, archpriest of St. Mary Major Basilica in Rome and a cardinal since 1985, turned 75 Nov. 4, 2006. A former bishop of Springfield-Cape Girardeau, Mo., he was archbishop of Boston from 1984 until his resignation from that post in 2002 in the wake of controversy over his handling of cases of clergy sex abuse there. He was named to his Rome post in 2004. Turning 75 on April 19 this year is Cardinal Justin Rigali of Philadelphia. Born in Los Angeles, he was ordained an archbishop in 1985 while serving as head of the school that educates future Vatican diplomats. He returned to the United States in 1994 to become archbishop of St. Louis, holding that post until his appointment as archbishop of Philadelphia in 2003. He was elevated to the College of Cardinals that same year. Pope Benedict XVI, like his predecessor Pope John Paul II, often asked cardinals to stay on the job after they reached the age of 75. Even when a cardinal retires in his 70s, he remains an active member of the College of Cardinals, eligible to enter a conclave and vote for a new pope, until age 80.
(01-06-2010, 02:32 AM)Iuvenalis Wrote: [ -> ]I don't like painting in overly broad strokes, but it's hard to see this as a bad thing. Many of these 'shepherds' are in dire need of replacement. Hopefully His Holiness appoints holy Bishops to replace them!

http://www.georgiabulletin.org/world/2010/01/04/US-1/

Hopefully we'll get some Catholic shepherds now. The only problem is Benedict seems to keep Bishops in office for a couple years after they retire. Thats why I am not so psyched about Mahony retiring in 11 he may retire then but the Pope may keep him on for two or three more years. Especially sins the fairies in LA love him so much.

Pope Benedict has a real chance to reshape the American church. The only problem is that I am not that optimistic.

Pope Benedict has no far shown no intrest in real reform of the bishops. He has let Cardinal Levada decide who the bishops ion America are. The appointments go through the Modernist Papal Nuncio, Levada, and the Congregation of Bishops. Then Benedict rubberstamps their decisions.

The trend of the last couple of years will continue. That is the transfer of bishops from one diocese to another. All the major dioceses have seen their bishop come from another diocese. The liberals are being shuffled around like chairs on a deck.

I pray that pope Benedict starts rejecting candidates and starts picking his own men that are holy orthodox priests. These men are usually found in parishes in the middle of nowhere and in the hospitals as chaplains.
(01-06-2010, 03:27 AM)SaintRafael Wrote: [ -> ]Pope Benedict has a real chance to reshape the American church. The only problem is that I am not that optimistic.
.

Neither am I. When Lavada was taken out of this country to avoid the sex scandal and appointd head of the CDF who did the Holy Father appointed as head of San Fran Freako?  Niederauer who gives communion to queers dressed as nuns. Sicko. His other appointments have been less then stellar all around the world, remember the commie he appointed to Poland but there was a huge outcry so he had to remove him. If there is one major area where Benedict has not improved on of JPII the small its Episcopal appointments.
It is frustrating, and the appointments are soooo important.

I mean, what could be much more important to the health of the Church but who the shepherds are??

It's not like he's taking on liturgical reform aggressively or anything...
(01-06-2010, 03:44 AM)Baskerville Wrote: [ -> ]Neither am I. When Lavada was taken out of this country to avoid the sex scandal and appointed head of the CDF who did the Holy Father appointed as head of San Fran Freako?  Niederauer who gives communion to queers dressed as nuns. Sicko.

I was surprised that the Pope didn't even try to put Fr. Joseph Fessio S.J. as bishop of San Fransisco.

Fr. Fessio may be a neocon, but he was at least conservative and a reform of the reform type. The fact that not even a close friend of the Pope, who was a student of his for many years, has prestige, is well known, and cannot be made an American bishop, speaks volumes about the lack of governance by Benedict.

If men like  Fr. Fessio and Fr. Corapi cannot made bishops, what chance is there for serious change? These men are not even stark raving traditionalists. They are modest conservative, reform of the reform, hermeneutic of continuity priests.    
Well said...