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Why do the Eastern Rite Catholics add "for thine is the kingdom ..." etc after the Pater Noster? Or on the other hand why don't we say it?
(01-29-2010, 08:09 AM)SinfullyLate Wrote: [ -> ]Why do the Eastern Rite Catholics add "for thine is the kingdom ..." etc after the Pater Noster? Or on the other hand why don't we say it?

So does the NO and Anglican Use.
(01-29-2010, 08:09 AM)SinfullyLate Wrote: [ -> ]Why do the Eastern Rite Catholics add "for thine is the kingdom ..." etc after the Pater Noster? Or on the other hand why don't we say it?

It is called doxology, and almost certainly is later addition to the Bible text (end of 1st Century).

It is peculiar, that the protestants who used to adhere to the textual analysis, accuse the Catholics to cut off from the Bible something what wasn't there originally.

I believe Catholics do not use it, because the Vulgata do not have the doxology.
it is simply added to the divine Liturgy to be said immediatly following the Ocha Noche (Our Father), it is not connected to the Lords prayer, as the priest and not the laity pronounce the words, it is not extra biblical as it is not presented as coming from the bible.
But in Anglican usage it is considered part of the Lords Prayer, yes?
No its a response by the laity to the priest after the priest completes the Pastor Noster. This is the case with at least the Rite II, which the NO derives from.
(01-29-2010, 08:09 AM)SinfullyLate Wrote: [ -> ]Why do the Eastern Rite Catholics add "for thine is the kingdom ..." etc after the Pater Noster? Or on the other hand why don't we say it?

For what it's worth, here's what The Catechism of the Catholic Church says about it:

 
PART FOUR
CHRISTIAN PRAYER

SECTION TWO
THE LORD'S PRAYER
"OUR FATHER!"

2759 Jesus "was praying at a certain place, and when he ceased, one of his disciples said to him, 'Lord, teach us to pray, as John taught his disciples.'"1 In response to this request the Lord entrusts to his disciples and to his Church the fundamental Christian prayer. St. Luke presents a brief text of five petitions,2 while St. Matthew gives a more developed version of seven petitions.3 The liturgical tradition of the Church has retained St. Matthew's text:


Our Father who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come.
Thy will be done on earth, as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
and forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil. 

2760 Very early on, liturgical usage concluded the Lord's Prayer with a doxology. In the Didache, we find, "For yours are the power and the glory for ever."4 The Apostolic Constitutions add to the beginning: "the kingdom," and this is the formula retained to our day in ecumenical prayer.5 The Byzantine tradition adds after "the glory" the words "Father, Son, and Holy Spirit." The Roman Missal develops the last petition in the explicit perspective of "awaiting our blessed hope" and of the Second Coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.6 Then comes the assembly's acclamation or the repetition of the doxology from the Apostolic Constitutions.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 Lk 11:1.
2 Cf. Lk 11:2-4.
3 Cf. Mt 6:9-13.
4 Didache 8,2:SCh 248,174.
5 Apostolic Constitutions, 7,24,1:PG 1,1016.
6 Titus 2:13; cf. Roman Missal 22, Embolism after the Lord's Prayer.


       
http://www.vatican.va/archive/ccc_css/ar...m/p4s2.htm
Zackly
doxology
thats the word I was looking for
This doxology is actually present in the Didache, which though not scriptural is one of the earliest sources of early Christian (possibly earlier than the epistles and Gospels) and certainly reflects some of the early liturgical aspects.

"The Didache" Wrote:for Thine is the power and the glory for ever..

here is a translation.  Not sure if it's good.
in fact like the chicken and the egg which came first the doxology or the insertion into the scripture. I would contend the doxology was what inspired the later insertion , but this is just a wild supposition on my part
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