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I've been very blessed to have our Priest provide one-on-one catechism classes to my 7 year old.  She is now ready for baptism and first communion.  I've been praying for help in choosing the best Godparents. Now I have a Godmother selected and the thought that keeps coming to me is to ask the Priest if he will be my daughter's Godfather.  Is it ok for me to ask this of him?
(04-12-2010, 10:46 PM)Fatima 3 Wrote: [ -> ]I've been very blessed to have our Priest provide one-on-one catechism classes to my 7 year old.  She is now ready for baptism and first communion.  I've been praying for help in choosing the best Godparents. Now I have a Godmother selected and the thought that keeps coming to me is to ask the Priest if he will be my daughter's Godfather.  Is it ok for me to ask this of him?

I'm an adult convert and my Godparent was/is my parish priest.  Note:  while he is the most traditional priest in my town (bummer that the nearest TLM is an hour away, but I do go every Sunday), he is Novus Ordo, so I don't know how a traditional priest would feel about this.  He told me that it is very common in Mexico, where he is from, to have the priest as a Godparent, though you really don't see it much in the US.

It made the most sense to me, because he was the major instrument in bringing me to the church after attending mass for over 2 years, and he taught me my catechism 1-on-1 (so I didn't have any crazy RCIA experiences).  He literally is my Godparent, my parent in the faith.

Pax vobiscum,
Jesse
I know a Priest who is a Godfather to a child. Obviously it's usual to have a close family member or friend do it, but if the Priest is someone close, there's certainly nothing wrong with it I would think.
Present Canon Law is not explicit, but the former law was very clear that a professed religious or cleric in major Orders is not permitted to become a Godparent unless he first obtains the permission of his Ordinary or Superior. (1917 CIC, Can. 766)

You may ask the priest, but this is not ideal, even if present law does not explicitly forbid it. A Godparent incurs grave responsibilities toward the candidate he sponsors, and such a situation creates a major burden and potential conflict of interest for a priest.

A religious, due to the vows that he takes, is not permitted to become a Godparent except in some extreme necessity, so his inability is not by law, but by profession.

I would recommend, instead, that you choose an appropriate layman (friend, relative, or even a parishioner who is a generally good Catholic). This is a better solution for all involved.
A common exception is if an uncle, for example, is a cleric. I don't think it's a good idea to ask a non-relative priest to be a godparent, unless he's closer to your family than anyone else or something. Because a priest is a spiritual father already, by virtue of his order.