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I know quite a few posters here attend university and universities these days seem to have adopted relativism, atheism and nihilism. I'd actually been warned about this by my priest but today was the first time I encountered it. A philosophy lecturer attempted to argue that Christianity had contradicted itself repeatedly in its history and claimed that the Church persecuted the franciscans because they taught that Christ was poor and that a papal bull was issued condemning the idea of Christ living in poverty as heretical. I approached him after this and told him I'd never heard of it before to which I got the reply "of course, they've supressed it obviously". I did a bit of research when I got home and it turns out the issue wasn't about Christ's poverty but whether He and his apostles owned any posessions at all. The later proposition is what the papal bull condemned as scripute portrays the apostles as owning some posessions. I plan on continuing the discussion with him next lecture.

Your stories?
I went to a Catholic Women's Liberal Arts College in Los Angeles, California (Red Flag!). It's a very small college and so there's only a handful of Theology professors teaching. My first Theology professor was from Marquette University and he taught us everything that is contrary to Catholic teaching. I had to take his classes because he was the only one who offered the "required" Theology courses to graduate (I think I took 3-4 courses from him). He denied the divinity of Christ and the immaculate conception of Mary (among a multitude of other things). Being the (former) passive and catechism lacking Catholic that I am, I just digested everything he taught. I actually admired him at some point. Thank God for not letting me go down that path.

The other professor was a feminist nun from Barry University. She's of the social justice and not much else variety. It was, I believe, an Introduction to Christian Ethics class, and yet we barely looked into the scriptures. I was just bombarded with documentaries... not that it didn't do me any good, but a touch of theology would've definitely helped.

Needless to say, I wish I went to another college, but the past is past, and I'm glad that I'm in a better place now. It shaped me somehow. We just have to be very prudent. It might be good to visit a professor during his office hours before signing up to his/her classes--inquire about his/her stance on a couple of things and that should clue you in.
I went to a secular university, and it was there that I discovered the works of Cardinal Newman, (British Lit).  And there were some pretty good discussions, some in which Catholic stuff was discussed, and happily I was able to fend off the anti-Catholic comments (not from teacher, but from students).

Christina
Luckily, I attended a Catholic college for undergrad. Also luckily, but only in retrospect, I was completely apathetic about my faith at that point, so the modernism didn't affect me.  One of my vivid memories is being talked into attending Mass by one of my roommates, and at the reception of Communion, having the priest place a lump of leavened bread (!!!!) in my hand and say "Accept Jesus, your friend!".

The flip side of that coin, however, was an Ethics class taught by (what I now realize was) a Thomist/Scholastic Dominican father.  Guy had a mind as sharp as a razor.  It was his class, and his class alone, that put me on the path to the intellectual acceptance of Church teaching (although it took 15 more years for me to really wise up and grow into it).  It was very much like Chesterton's observation in "Orthodoxy" where he invokes the analogy of putting any old stick in any old hole versus putting just the one correct key into an intricate lock.

I did go to a state university for grad school.  I am not sure there was even an Newman society on campus.  Really no religious influence whatsoever there.....no actual disparagement of Christianity, just plain ignoring it.

IMO, it would be terribly, terribly, terribly easy to lapse into anti-Catholicism (or, at best, indifference) at any university these days.  Particularly because at 18 most students are looking for something to rebel against.
(05-18-2010, 08:37 AM)DesperatelySeeking Wrote: [ -> ]Luckily, I attended a Catholic college for undergrad. Also luckily, but only in retrospect, I was completely apathetic about my faith at that point, so the modernism didn't affect me.  One of my vivid memories is being talked into attending Mass by one of my roommates, and at the reception of Communion, having the priest place a lump of leavened bread (!!!!) in my hand and say "Accept Jesus, your friend!".

The flip side of that coin, however, was an Ethics class taught by (what I now realize was) a Thomist/Scholastic Dominican father.  Guy had a mind as sharp as a razor.  It was his class, and his class alone, that put me on the path to the intellectual acceptance of Church teaching (although it took 15 more years for me to really wise up and grow into it).  It was very much like Chesterton's observation in "Orthodoxy" where he invokes the analogy of putting any old stick in any old hole versus putting just the one correct key into an intricate lock.

I did go to a state university for grad school.  I am not sure there was even an Newman society on campus.  Really no religious influence whatsoever there.....no actual disparagement of Christianity, just plain ignoring it.

IMO, it would be terribly, terribly, terribly easy to lapse into anti-Catholicism (or, at best, indifference) at any university these days.  Particularly because at 18 most students are looking for something to rebel against.

Luckily there seem to be a few christians at my university although they're mostly protestants. Even luckier all the militant atheists seem to be the type of people that read the first few chapters of "The God Delusion" and now think they're an expert on the topic.
I attend a secular uni. It's a real eye opener. Makes you realise that you really gota make sure you just dont follow the crowd in things.

In some respects, its better than going to a catholic university. At least in a secular environment the enemy appears more clearer. Rather than getting sucked into a false version of the faith.
(05-18-2010, 08:37 AM)DesperatelySeeking Wrote: [ -> ]IMO, it would be terribly, terribly, terribly easy to lapse into anti-Catholicism (or, at best, indifference) at any university these days.  Particularly because at 18 most students are looking for something to rebel against.

You're not too far off.

I grew up in what would be considered a "conservative" NO parish (i.e. no alter girls, no balloons, priests that would actually admonish people for clapping for the choir, etc.). Not perfect or even really good, but so much better than most of the other NOs that I have seen. I hadn't really even heard of the TLM at the time but felt pretty good with where I was and it took me quite a while to discern whether or not I was supposed to enter the seminary. I didn't (very good thing in retrospect) and instead went to a state school. The mass on campus was awful. It was full of guitars and drums, backslapping and swaying, and all sorts of things that I found inappropriate. I couldn't stand it but I dutifully went, for a while anyway. One weekend I just couldn't do it anymore, I was always made so angry and couldn't stand the looks when I was the only one kneeling during the consecration (no kneelers), so I skipped. I quickly realized I shouldn't have and that it was no big deal for me to be looked at strangely or to have to suffer through some crappy music. Confession was by appointment only so I called the priest and he told me to meet him at his house. "Confession" took place in his living room with us just casually sitting in oversized chairs. He wasn't wearing a stole or any type of religious garb and the whole thing just felt wrong. In any case, I proceeded to confess my sins and to my amazement, he basically tried to explain why missing mass wasn't a sin. He even asked what my reason was and I told him that even though it was no excuse, I just didn't feel comfortable with atmosphere. He basically told me that it was ok and that missing mass was no big deal and if I wasn't comfortable I didn't have to go and God would understand. I was disgusted with the whole situation and didn't even no what to say let alone do.

And so began my years away from the Church.
I go to a secular university, and concerning Christianity in general, it seems rather apathetic, save for the non-denominational Protestant Bible study groups like aletheia roaming around. The Catholic Campus Ministry doesn't do much either, they feel like any other "charitable organization" there.
I went to a public university that has come to be synonymous with liberalism. I mostly took lit classes (transferred my GE from community college) and in both places I heard a few typical anti-Catholic stereotypes, but nothing very extreme.
(05-18-2010, 10:18 AM)MedicMeyers Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-18-2010, 08:37 AM)DesperatelySeeking Wrote: [ -> ]IMO, it would be terribly, terribly, terribly easy to lapse into anti-Catholicism (or, at best, indifference) at any university these days.  Particularly because at 18 most students are looking for something to rebel against.

You're not too far off.

I grew up in what would be considered a "conservative" NO parish (i.e. no alter girls, no balloons, priests that would actually admonish people for clapping for the choir, etc.). Not perfect or even really good, but so much better than most of the other NOs that I have seen. I hadn't really even heard of the TLM at the time but felt pretty good with where I was and it took me quite a while to discern whether or not I was supposed to enter the seminary. I didn't (very good thing in retrospect) and instead went to a state school. The mass on campus was awful. It was full of guitars and drums, backslapping and swaying, and all sorts of things that I found inappropriate. I couldn't stand it but I dutifully went, for a while anyway. One weekend I just couldn't do it anymore, I was always made so angry and couldn't stand the looks when I was the only one kneeling during the consecration (no kneelers), so I skipped. I quickly realized I shouldn't have and that it was no big deal for me to be looked at strangely or to have to suffer through some crappy music. Confession was by appointment only so I called the priest and he told me to meet him at his house. "Confession" took place in his living room with us just casually sitting in oversized chairs. He wasn't wearing a stole or any type of religious garb and the whole thing just felt wrong. In any case, I proceeded to confess my sins and to my amazement, he basically tried to explain why missing mass wasn't a sin. He even asked what my reason was and I told him that even though it was no excuse, I just didn't feel comfortable with atmosphere. He basically told me that it was ok and that missing mass was no big deal and if I wasn't comfortable I didn't have to go and God would understand. I was disgusted with the whole situation and didn't even no what to say let alone do.

And so began my years away from the Church.

I'm not sure what your anecdote has to do with university education in general? I would agree that campus ministries tend to be liberal but they are also easy to avoid (I never went anywhere near the Newman Center).
(05-18-2010, 04:18 PM)piabee Wrote: [ -> ]I'm not sure what your anecdote has to do with university education in general? I would agree that campus ministries tend to be liberal but they are also easy to avoid (I never went anywhere near the Newman Center).

I would submit that the very fact that "campus ministries tend to be liberal" speaks to the effects of university education in general. It is because of the adoption of "relativism, atheism and nihilism" that the OP mentions that the entire campus community often becomes poisoned. So in the case of a college town (the town I was in only existed because of the school) it is not easy to avoid the campus ministry as the local parish is functionally identical and mostly made up of professors and employees of the university. I'm not 100% sure but I believe that the priest was the same for both. I did give the town parish a shot in the hope that it would be better. Ironically the biggest difference between the campus and town while I was there was that the campus mass was held in something that almost resembled a church.

My point is that sadly the univeristy education spills into its surroundings and permeates everything that it touches. Furthermore, if one agrees with the priest that warned Servus_Maria that there is danger (I do), it would seem that its effects on the students in the pews would be quite relevant to both university education and the status of campus ministries.
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