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Come meet a young lady who recently graduated from St Dominic’s Girl School in Post Falls, ID. She moved to Post Falls with her single mother, who wanted to raise her in a Traditional Catholic Community. In St Paul’s letter to the Corinthians, he warns us: “1 If I speak with the tongues of men, and of angels, and have not charity, I am become as sounding brass, or a tinkling cymbal. 2 And if I should have prophecy and should know all mysteries, and all knowledge, and if I should have all faith, so that I could remove mountains, and have not charity, I am nothing. 3 And if I should distribute all my goods to feed the poor, and if I should deliver my body to be burned, and have not charity, it profiteth me nothing. 4 Charity is patient, is kind: charity envieth not, dealeth not perversely; is not puffed up; 5 Is not ambitious, seeketh not her own, is not provoked to anger, thinketh no evil;" What happens to our children when they experience a community that not only falls short of this all encompassing virtue, but makes a mockery of charity? Listen to this sad, but important lesson to all Traditional Catholics.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/backyardradtrads
The channel linked is quite informative.
I agree.
This is what I have been trying to say on this forum. The crowd who goes around yelling "NOtards," "Your not a real Catholic unless you go to the TLM," "The pope is a modernist," and other such things, or saying insults left and right, do the trad cause, which must be dedicated to serving God in our faith, a great diservice. Unfortunately my last thread about it ended in being locked due to it becoming a flame war.
I wish that interview had been a little shorter, since I'm supposed to be doing a lot of other things besides being on fisheaters, but I listened to the whole thing and identify with quite a bit of what she said. She makes a lot of great points about the pressures and severity of some trads and how it can affect your developement while growing up, especially as a teenager. I experienced a lot of the things she talks about and know others who have gone through the same or worse.

I actually spent one night at St. Dominic's in Post Falls when I was fifteen. It was traumatic. It's not that anyone was unkind--in fact they were all pretty friendly, and the nuns seemed nice--but it was like joining a cult. Everything she says in the interview about the dress code I remember very vividly: no bright colors, nothing fashionable, nothing too short or, oddly, too long. The rules were endless and the entire day was structured. Everyone got up together, had a study hall, had a meditation, went to Mass, had breakfast (yes, all of that was before breakfast), classes and study halls for the rest of the day, PE in the afternoon, more study halls (I guess they needed them), and then similar stuff in the evening and everyone had to shower and get ready for bed at the same time. You were only allowed to wash your hair twice a week! Who decides that?? There was not a moment of time to yourself during the whole day. Plus, the whole place just had this absolutely frigid atmosphere; there was nothing joyful about it at all. Some of the girls seemed to be having a good time but it seemed like they had just gotten used to it, which was eerie in its own way.

Anyway, I cried like a baby and had to be taken home. I've never regretted it.

The school I went to after that was pretty much the opposite...trad but very lax and with weak academics, but people would talk about Post Falls sometimes. It seems like they do try very hard to keep the boys and girls from talking to each other. One of my friends said that they only wanted the girls to become nuns or to have careers, and the ones who got married were basically just giving into their passions. Of course that may have just been a rumor, but dating was definitely frowned on, as it was in my family. (Someone please explain to me the point of that....lol) I can say though that the school is very strong academically but has almost no “domestic arts” training, if anyone thinks it's a some kind of training ground for future trad wives...not so much as a cooking class. Oh and the food in the cafeteria was dreadful.

It's sad and frustrating, though, that the girl in the interview left the Church to become a Baptist. She claims to be a tenacious and stubborn person, but obviously she didn't have it when she needed it most. It's also a little weird that she goes on and on about how “puritanical” the Catholics are, only to reveal at the end that she thinks Protestantism is right? What sense does that make?
Certain families at my parish remind me too much of this community. These same families, which are far from a majority but make up a close knit and outspoken minority, have looked down upon others for listening to modern music, dating, being too social (seriously), smoking, and drinking anything alcoholic besides beer.

There is one young woman that attends my parish that is particularly attractive (no, she's not single. Thanks for asking). She dresses normally, not immodestly, shows quite a bit of piety, and is very good with children. She's still much like a young women in that she likes to shop and is a bit easily over-involved in the dating life, but nothing too bad. So how do these families react to her? They condemn her and tell everyone else to stay away from her and that she dresses immodestly. Do they "confront" her about these things as a legitimate concern for her soul? No, they shun her and never speak to her.

To be honest I think just a lot of these other young women are just jealous of her for some odd reason.
(06-03-2010, 01:44 AM)WanderingPenitent Wrote: [ -> ]Certain families at my parish remind me too much of this community. These same families, which are far from a majority but make up a close knit and outspoken minority, have looked down upon others for listening to modern music, dating, being too social (seriously), smoking, and drinking anything alcoholic besides beer.

There is one young woman that attends my parish that is particularly attractive (no, she's not single. Thanks for asking). She dresses normally, not immodestly, shows quite a bit of piety, and is very good with children. She's still much like a young women in that she likes to shop and is a bit easily over-involved in the dating life, but nothing too bad. So how do these families react to her? They condemn her and tell everyone else to stay away from her and that she dresses immodestly. Do they "confront" her about these things as a legitimate concern for her soul? No, they shun her and never speak to her.

To be honest I think just a lot of these other young women are just jealous of her for some odd reason.

Out of interest is your parish SSPX too?
Does the school have a website? I tried google, but didn't come up with an official website.
(06-03-2010, 03:55 AM)Servus_Maria Wrote: [ -> ]Out of interest is your parish SSPX too?

Just as an aside, there is not really any such thing as an SSPX chapel, since that's a sub-unit of a diocese, usually with specific geographic boundaries and rights in that area. The Society has chapels, missions, and maybe oratories.
Iolanthe Wrote:dating was definitely frowned on, as it was in my family. (Someone please explain to me the point of that....lol)

The Christian criticism of dating is that it allows for a crummy pre-marriage experience. One of the reasons the divorce rate is so high in the United States is because of our culture of "dating." Being involved in serial open-ended relationships - silly "promise rings" aside - is not a good preparation for a lifelong commitment. Dating can be cute when you're 16. However, when people are in the their 20s, 30s, 40s, etc and still having "boyfriends" and "girlfriends" they've really been trained for disaster when/if they get married.

Dating also feeds into an aversion to commitment which is widespread in our society.

Quote:It's also a little weird that she goes on and on about how “puritanical” the Catholics are, only to reveal at the end that she thinks Protestantism is right? What sense does that make?

We need to remember that Protestantism is a very diverse thing. Puritanism came out of the Anglican tradition. It was as hostile to other expressions of Protestantism as it was to Catholicism. The Baptist faith came out of a background which was quite distinct from Puritanism from the very start.
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