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Full Version: Pope Benedict: Obsessed with Celestine V??
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(07-02-2010, 10:27 PM)Walty Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-02-2010, 09:50 PM)Credo Wrote: [ -> ]Obsessed?

Hah.  No kidding.  He's visited the tomb twice?  How many times has he visited the tombs of other popes?

Good question. Not to mention that he declared a "Celestine year", in honor of the 800th anniversary of Celestine's birth which will end on Aug.29 this year. I hope all this attention for Celestine means he is trying to gather his strength to face the wolves in the Church. Anyone else notice this passage in his homily ending the year of the priests?
"The Church too must use the shepherd’s rod, the rod with which he protects the faith against those who falsify it, against currents which lead the flock astray. The use of the rod can actually be a service of love. Today we can see that it has nothing to do with love when conduct unworthy of the priestly life is tolerated. Nor does it have to do with love if heresy is allowed to spread and the faith twisted and chipped away, as if it were something that we ourselves had invented. As if it were no longer God’s gift, the precious pearl which we cannot let be taken from us. Even so, the rod must always become once again the shepherd’s staff – a staff which helps men and women to tread difficult paths and to follow the Lord."



http://www.zenit.org/article-29576?l=english

C.
(07-03-2010, 06:55 AM)Cetil Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-02-2010, 10:27 PM)Walty Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-02-2010, 09:50 PM)Credo Wrote: [ -> ]Obsessed?

Hah.  No kidding.  He's visited the tomb twice?  How many times has he visited the tombs of other popes?

Good question. Not to mention that he declared a "Celestine year", in honor of the 800th anniversary of Celestine's birth which will end on Aug.29 this year. I hope all this attention for Celestine means he is trying to gather his strength to face the wolves in the Church. Anyone else notice this passage in his homily ending the year of the priests?
"The Church too must use the shepherd’s rod, the rod with which he protects the faith against those who falsify it, against currents which lead the flock astray. The use of the rod can actually be a service of love. Today we can see that it has nothing to do with love when conduct unworthy of the priestly life is tolerated. Nor does it have to do with love if heresy is allowed to spread and the faith twisted and chipped away, as if it were something that we ourselves had invented. As if it were no longer God’s gift, the precious pearl which we cannot let be taken from us. Even so, the rod must always become once again the shepherd’s staff – a staff which helps men and women to tread difficult paths and to follow the Lord."



http://www.zenit.org/article-29576?l=english

C.

Right. This is the hope. I'm just not sure if there is sufficient evidence that he is drawing more attention (either his own or the Church's) on Celestine in particular. When did he say something about a Celestine year?
Celestine year? Right here:
"VATICAN CITY, JUNE 16, 2010 (Zenit.org).- Benedict XVI will visit the earthquake scourged Abruzzi region of Italy on July 4 and venerate the relics of St. Celestine V, the 13th-century Pope who abdicated the papacy after only five months.

The Vatican press office published the official program for the one-day trip to the city of Sulmona, located about an hour southwest of the epicenter of the April 2009 quake that left more than 300 dead and more than 65,000 homeless in and around the city of L'Aquila.

Benedict XVI visited the region that same month, at which time he made a stop at the Collemaggio Basilica in L'Aquila to pray in front of the casket with the remains of Celestine V. To emphasize his spiritual solidarity, the Pontiff left there the pallium that he received at the beginning of his pontificate.

The Pontiff then convoked a Celestine Year -- from Aug. 28, 2009, to Aug. 29, 2010 -- that celebrates the 800th birthday of the Pope. The saint's remains have been on pilgrimage during this year throughout the dioceses of the region.


http://www.zenit.org/article-29620?l=english

And right chere, the Indulgence:

"Vatican grants indulgence to mark Celestine Year
Posted: Monday, August 31, 2009 12:01 am


Vatican grants indulgence to mark Celestine Year | Vatican grants indulgence to mark Celestine Year,Apostolic Penitentiary, St Celestine V during the year dedicated to him.
On behalf of Pope Benedict XVI, the Apostolic Penitentiary has granted a special plenary indulgence to those who pray before the remains of St Celestine V during the year dedicated to him.

The Celestine Year began on Friday, with an opening ceremony by Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone, the Pope's secretary of state, in L'Aquila, Italy, a town struck by an earthquake last April.

This jubilee year, which closes on 29 August 2010, celebrates the 800th birthday of the Pope. Born as Pietro Angeleri da Morrone in 1209, he was elected Pontiff in 1294, and died in 1296.


Celestine V, a monk and hermit who founded the Celestine Order in the Abruzzi region, Italy, is known for voluntarily resigning from ministry as the Bishop of Rome, after only five months of his pontificate.

He resigned in order to return to the life of a hermit, naming as his motivations: 'the desire for humility, for a purer life, for a stainless conscience, the deficiencies of his own physical strength, his ignorance, the perverseness of the people, his longing for the tranquility of his former life.'

Celestine V was imprisoned by his successor, Pope Boniface VIII, and he died a few months later.

http://www.indcatholicnews.com/news.php?viewStory=14737

C.
Bonfiace VIII was one of the last great Popes before the Babylonian Captivity.  The French King attempted to arrest him at Agnani in when was it?  1308?
http://eponymousflower.blogspot.com/2010...cs-of.html

I'd like to think it was a more saintly motive than a pathological one for our Holy Father.
Why did Boniface imprison him?  ???
(07-03-2010, 06:50 PM)QuisUtDeus Wrote: [ -> ]Why did Boniface imprison him?  ???

From what I've read of medieval Church history, I get the impression that Pope Boniface VIII was kind of a jerk.
(07-03-2010, 06:50 PM)QuisUtDeus Wrote: [ -> ]Why did Boniface imprison him?  ???

It was a good idea.  He didn't want Celestine being captured by the French or other potential enemies of the Church in Italy and used by them as he had been when he was Pope.
Celestine may have been used by the French as an Anti-Pope.  Boniface VIII was one of the great Popes and it is a calumny that he had treated Celestine cruelly or had him murdered.
(07-03-2010, 06:50 PM)QuisUtDeus Wrote: [ -> ]Why did Boniface imprison him?  ???

this is from a site devoted to all the pope's histories.  the article seems to have been written by a european [the way the dates are written indicates that] and someone whose english is imperfect but it's not hard to figure out the meaning despite the occasional error.  it includes several photos and a detail of a painting of Celestine V's coronation; when you click the thumbnail of the painting, you see the entire image but in b/w, which is disappointing.  the photos enlarge more satisfactorily.

http://www.archelaos.com/popes/details.aspx?id=225

i added bolding regarding Boniface's motivation and Celestine's imprisonment and death, statements which may be open to debate.  no doubt historians have studied these events and there are references available but finding them online may be impossible unless you have a better search engine than the free ones.

"The 80 year old Celestine V abdicated on 13 Dec, 1294. Confronted with his affairs by the Franciscan poet, Jacopone da Todi, Celestine sought initially to hand over parts of his authority to 3 different cardinals, but this was rejected. His request to abdicate were initially rejected as well; however, cardinal Benedetto Gaetano, seeking for himself the pontifacy, convinced the other cardinals that this unprecedented request was indeed legal.


Castle of Fumone
Cardinal Benedetto immediately locked Celestine into a prison in the castle of Fumone, lest he should become the tool schismatics. Most probably Benedetto didn't want the abdication to be declared illegal, and his own ascension to pope as well. Hearing of the news, King Charles II along with a host of supporters, surrounded the prison and begged Celestine to reconsider. Nine days later, the resignation was declared irreversable, and the cardinals entered the conclave to elect a successor. The next day, Cardinal Benedetto Caetano was proclaimed Pope Boniface VIII (1294-1303). Boniface would cancel most of the decrees of Celestine. He would also waste no time enriching himself and his family.

With aid from his supporters, Celestine escaped prison, but continued to be persued by Boniface for nine months. Eventually he was captured and returned to prison where he died ten months later on 19 May 1296. Many scholars believe he was murdered there by Boniface VIII. His skull was found with a nail-sized hole in it. He was buried near the castle, but his bones were later moved to the church of Aquila, where they remain venerated today. He was canonised a saint by Pope Clement V (1305-1314) in 1313. His feast is celebrated on 19 May.

here is the enlarged photo of Celestine's skull, showing the hole made by a nail or other sharp object:

http://www.archelaos.com/popes/image.aspx?id=65

also,

"Several Italian dailies quoted the Rev. Quirino Salomone on Wednesday as saying a CT scan performed on Celestine's mummified remains 10 years ago showed a half-inch hole in the left temple."

according to an article at

http://nl.newsbank.com/nl-search/we/Archives?p_product=AASB&p_theme=aasb&p_action=search&p_maxdocs=200&p_topdoc=1&p_text_direct-0=0EA07674B2438A37&p_field_direct-0=document_id&p_perpage=10&p_sort=YMD_date:D&s_trackval=GooglePM

A. Baker says charges that Boniface killed Celestine or had him killed are calumny, which is what the Catholic Encyclopedia says.  But the CE was published in 1913 and if the remains are mummified, it's entirely possible that the hole in the flesh no longer is visible and the hole in the skull was not visible without a CT scan, which was not yet invented in 1913.  It certainly seems that he was killed, unless it can be proven that the wound was postmortem.  Whether it can ever be determined "whodunnit" is another matter altogether.  I haven't read all of the second article because you have to join the site first and i don't have the time right now.  I doubt it has any more details as to "whodunnit" or that would have been mentioned in the first paragraphs but I'll check it out later.



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