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I'm not Jacobin. I probably would have supported King Louis XVI during the French Revolution. And I DON'T like Philadelphia. But the idea of storming a local prison on Bastille Day while a Marie Antoinette impersonator throws packaged desserts at you? Well, that's just spectacular. Let them eat Tastykakes!

Quote:Let Them Eat (Tasty)Kake at Eastern State
Grab a pitchfork and storm the Bastille
By LAUREN HEPBURN
Updated 7:52 AM EDT, Fri, Jul 10, 2009

[Image: bastille+day13241.jpg]
Getty Images

Are you a snotty aristocrat or revolutionary peasant? Take a french bath, throw on a little powder and head on over to the Eastern State Penitentiary’s celebration of Bastille Day this Saturday.

The annual event is a Philly favorite. You can grab a pitchfork and a some mob mentality to go after Marie Antoinette as armed troops storm the Bastille, re-enacting the queen's capture and sentencing her to the guillotine. Thousands join in the shower of TastyKake Butterscotch Krimpets. Of course this event occurs after Marie Antoinette (impersonator of course) declares, “Let them eat cake!"

Rock out to live music from the Philadelphia Freedom Band & Musette. If you're not into dooming royalty there’s also a Pet Parade, a Tricycle Tour de France and a costume contest.

The "storming" runs from 2 to 6 p.m.





After the festival, start a revolution in the streets of Fairmount. The canons sound off around 6:30 p.m. for the start of the after-party.

The neighborhood has some great places to eat. Places like London Grill, Jack's Firehouse, the Belgian Café and Rembrandt’s Restaurant are celebrating Bastille Day with Marie Antoinette and French-inspired cocktails and foods. The menus go french on Friday if you want to get into character early.
These Jacobin "festivities" celebrate a visceral contempt for the Old Order, a hatred for Old Christendom, not to mention that they thrive on and perpetuate absurd myths such as that of Queen Marie Antoinette telling peasants to "eat cake".

It's disgusting. There's nothing funny about this.

Remember the martyrs of the Vendée instead.
I don't think most Americans make the same religious/political connections that Europeans make.
(07-14-2010, 12:44 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: [ -> ]I don't think most Americans make the same religious/political connections that Europeans make.

You don't study history at school?
(07-14-2010, 12:44 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: [ -> ]I don't think most Americans make the same religious/political connections that Europeans make.

Thanks to our being ruled by a Masonic government.  Even our "Catholic" politicians are at least willing to allow infanticide in some cases - if they don't outright support it in all cases - yet nothing is done about it.  What can we expect?
(07-14-2010, 12:44 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: [ -> ]I don't think most Americans make the same religious/political connections that Europeans make.


That's because most Americans are poorly educated, especially regarding the French Revolution.  There most certainly was a strong religious element to those events.  And by continuing to make light of its history, we perpetuate the many French Revolution myths (like the "let them eat cake" quote) that glorify the Enlightenment and demonize that archaic dinosaur, the Catholic Church.
May the martyrs of the Vendee Counter-revolution rest in peace, O Blessed Lord.
Pray
(07-14-2010, 12:47 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-14-2010, 12:44 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: [ -> ]I don't think most Americans make the same religious/political connections that Europeans make.
You don't study history at school?
Not European history... it tends to be optional at best.
(07-14-2010, 12:47 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-14-2010, 12:44 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: [ -> ]I don't think most Americans make the same religious/political connections that Europeans make.

You don't study history at school?

We do.  And indeed, I teach history.  But US Education isn't so focused on European history. In fact, I'd say that in 90% of public education, the French Revolution comprises about one week's worth of instruction in a student's entire K-12 academic career.  And as a result, most Americans probably think that the French Revolution is about "sticking it to the man" more than  they make any connections to monarchical rebellion, old orders and Vendée martyrs.

rbjmartin Wrote:That's because most Americans are poorly educated, especially regarding the French Revolution.  There most certainly was a strong religious element to those events.  And by continuing to make light of its history, we perpetuate the many French Revolution myths (like the "let them eat cake" quote) that glorify the Enlightenment and demonize that archaic dinosaur, the Catholic Church.

I agree to the first part of your statement and disagree with the second.  There was a strong anti-religious element to the French Revolution.  Indeed, I'm not sure that you can really understand the Revolution without understanding the pervasiveness of the Huguenots into French society or the anti-clericalism of the Jacobins.  Otherwise, you end up with the cartoonish portrays of the French Revolution like that it was a fight for the "power of the people"-- much how like modern Americans think that the American Revolution was a rebellion against the tax on tea.  It reduces the argument to absurdity and Glenn Beckisms.

BUT.  I don't think that it does a disservice to history to engage historical events in a lighthearted or even flippant manner.  No more than going to a Medieval Times to eat tomato soup and drink Pepsi, or to go to a Washington Nationals game to see Teddy Roosevelt lose in a footrace with Thomas Jefferson.  Hell, I bet most people leave the Philadelphia Jail thinking more about cupcakes than whether or not Marie Antoinette was an out-of-touch queen.
I took a great AP European history class in high school...learned alot...

Unfortunately, the teacher was WAAAAAY anti Catholic and Holy Roman Empire (he wrote it on the board and put "D:None of the above" next to it).  He dressed up as Luther for Halloween and, I've found out recently, is a Missouri Synod Lutheran (don't know what the Missouri Synod is about) - that explains a lot!

Unfortunately, I was an atheist in high school after having been raised Protestant, so I didn't care about what he did and actually joined in the calumny of Holy Mother Church - Our Lord forgive me.   Pray
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