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Greetings,

There is a city on the "Digital Continent" where I think everyone here might like to visit. It is called Hieronymopolis and is a place of refuge and study especially dedicated to the Re-Conversion of England by Re-Constructing her True History and Re-Catholicizing her Imagination. Many people are sadly unaware that there is a golden thread of Catholicity woven through the rich tapestry of English history stretching back to the age of the Apostles. Hieronymopolis hopes to illuminate what has labored beneath the crushing weight of an "enforced obscurity" for centuries.

“Here now, you have this small gift composed at several stolen hours in time of my daily journeying.” - St. Edmund Campion

Our Lady of Walsingham, pray for us.
St. Hierome, pray for us.
All ye Holy Martyrs of England, pray for us.
Amen.
Lovely initiative. Best of luck - after all, England was and always will be "the dowry of Mary"!
(08-09-2010, 07:07 PM)Melita Wrote: [ -> ]England was and always will be "the dowry of Mary"!

It's a beautiful tradition.

Archdiocese of Southwark Wrote:There is a tradition that the title 'Dowry of Mary' goes back to Edward the Confessor (1042 - 1066). This may well be true, but there is no historical documentation to support it. There is no doubt, however, about the deep devotion to Our Lady that existed in medieval England and the dedication rests on this foundation.

The first documentary evidence for the title was found in a painting which used to hang in the English College in Rome, which showed Richard II (1377 - 1399) and his consort kneeling before Our Lady and offering England to her. He holds a parchment with a latin inscription:'This is your dowry, O pious Virgin'. Perhaps the painting portrayed the King presenting England to Our Lady as her Dowry in Westminster Abbey in 1381.

At the same time (1399) Thomas Arundel, Archbishop of Canterbury, wrote to his suffragan bishops:

"The contemplation of the great mystery of the Incarnation has drawn all Christian nations to venerate her from whom came the first beginnings of our redemption. But we English, being the servants of her special inheritance and her own dowry, as we are commonly called, ought to surpass others in the fervour of our praises and devotions."

So the title of England as 'The Dowry of Mary' was definitely in use by the end of the fourteenth century, but Archbishop Arundel's letter seems to indicate that at the time of his writing it was already in common use, indicating an earlier origin.
Hilaire Belloc on the English Reformation :

"The English Reformation was the most important European event between the conversion of the Roman Empire and modern times. It was the most important because upon it the unity or break-up of Christendom depended. It is of especial importance to Englishmen because it is by far the greatest event in the story of their country ; but it is of still greater importance to Europeans as a whole, because if England had not been torn away from the unity of Christendom that unity would be intact to this day. It was the loss of England which determined the whole affair. Because of that loss Europe ultimately fell into two camps, the Protestant culture on the one hand, and the Catholic culture on the other. On account of this division men grew weary of general conceptions ; scepticism became first common, then universal. Sovereign nationalities ceased to admit any common bond, and therefore became at last the murderously self-destructive things they are to-day. It was through the Reformation that the dissolution of Europe came and that chaos of which we are now suffering the last, and perhaps mortal, effects."
I don't think too much of England.  Considering what they've done to other peoples in thier history, its no wonder God blinds them to the truth of the Gospels.  When they are humbled enough from destruction that comes from following false doctrine, then they might be open to hearing truth.
(08-10-2010, 08:58 AM)Old_Soldier Wrote: [ -> ]I don't think too much of England.  Considering what they've done to other peoples in thier history, its no wonder God blinds them to the truth of the Gospels.  When they are humbled enough from destruction that comes from following false doctrine, then they might be open to hearing truth.

Well, England doesn't think much of you either. Wink

(08-10-2010, 05:49 AM)Hieronymopolis Wrote: [ -> ]Hilaire Belloc on the English Reformation :

"The English Reformation was the most important European event between the conversion of the Roman Empire and modern times. It was the most important because upon it the unity or break-up of Christendom depended. It is of especial importance to Englishmen because it is by far the greatest event in the story of their country ; but it is of still greater importance to Europeans as a whole, because if England had not been torn away from the unity of Christendom that unity would be intact to this day.

I don't suppose Belloc thought much of the Eastern church or the Great Schism.
Not terribly. It seems to me, that he, like others of his time, thought the Byzantine Schismatical groups, to not be consequence or great matter---as if they would disintegrate and fall apart---being converted eventually or dissolving entirely.
I would appreciate any constructive feedback on Hieronymopolis.