FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums

Full Version: News Clip, "Christianity In China"
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Christianity In China, CBS News

Interesting.  There are certainly a lot of them so in a soul count what they do matters more than what the US or UK do as our combined populations add up to about 1/3rd of their number.

English speaking empires have ruled the world for 300+ years now perhaps it is time for someone else to have a crack at it.  After all we are not predominantly Catholic.
You've got it right Ggreg, we English speaking Nations which have ruled the word are on the way out.
tim
timoose Wrote:we English speaking Nations which have ruled the word are on the way out.

One does not get a foreboding sense of a global power shift in the United States. However observe contemporary European art, especially music, and the feelings of lost prominence and national vanity/preoccupation is palpable.

Here are some recent works which highlight this; listen to the lyrics carefully:

[video=youtube]

[/video]


[video=youtube]

[/video]



There is one American work which approaches this emerging zeitgeist; again, listen to the words:

[video=youtube]

[/video]




(08-16-2010, 05:43 AM)ggreg Wrote: [ -> ]Interesting.  There are certainly a lot of them so in a soul count what they do matters more than what the US or UK do as our combined populations add up to about 1/3rd of their number.

English speaking empires have ruled the world for 300+ years now perhaps it is time for someone else to have a crack at it.  After all we are not predominantly Catholic.

That is not quite true.

English is understood by almost all its speakers, in writing or speaking.

There are many Chinese languages. The most spoken one has many dialects which are not mutually comprehensible. The writing system is the only thing which keeps some of them together.

There are over 1 billion speakers of a Chinese language, but that doesn't mean 1 billion people can communicate with each other. Mandarin is the most spoken Chinese language and it has less than 900 million speaker (not all comprehensible, but lets pretend they are). This is much more than the native speakers of English (around 340 million), but there are many people who speak English as a second language, estimated to be more than a billion and a half speakers total. Plus, English is used as a common language in many places, such as India, Hong Kong, etc.

When it comes to actual international communication, English, Modern Standard Arabic and Spanish are largely used, with French, Portuguese, Russian, Chinese (in written form) used in some contexts as well.

Just because a language has a lot of speakers, that doesn't mean it is ideal for communication. Even if one were fluent in every single Chinese language, you would only need to know two to really do business in "China" (mainland and otherwise), and even then, the Chinese people would have knowledge of English.

For a Chinese language to be internationally used, it would first have to be known by people other than the Chinese (it isn't). Its script would have to be usable for more things than writing Chinese (it isn't). And it would have to be largely mutually comprehensible by its native speakers (it isn't).

English, by a bizarre sequence of events, is known all over the world, its script is used for languages, even to the exclusion of the native script, and in its written form, it is understandable to all English learners, and most spoken forms are mutually comprehensible.
Herr_Mannelig, I think that the quote you cited from ggreg was just noting that the British and American hold on world events has (Britian) and is (America, before our very eyes) becoming a thing of the past.