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Should we Catholics be refusing to receive certain kinds of care from healthcare professionals who are not the same gender?  The most obvious concern I have is of Women's Complaints.  I have no idea what goes on in an examination by a Women's Complaints doctor (and I'm not sure I want to know), but something tells me that something is wrong about a woman allowing a male gynecologist to treat or examine her for routine things even if there is no temptation to do anything scandalous.  My mother's last gynecologist was a man who practiced for more than thirty years and she didn't seem uncomfortable about it.

My question also applies to men seeking treatment for certain things.  I don't mean something like having a female hygienist when visiting the dentist for a regular checkup, but if there are problems in or with certain areas should female nurses or doctors be asked to leave the treatment room?

Obviously in a critical situation a physician or professional of the opposite gender may be necessary as a last resort, but I'm asking about regular or urgent visits to a physician.
I grew up with men doctors and a male doctor delivered both of my babies. I think that back then I would not have wanted a female doctor, only because they weren't as common as today. My daughter has woman doctors and she feels more comfotable with them. I just never thought about it to be honest with you. They are professionals, after all.
There is nothing wrong with male gynecologists/obstetricians, although many women prefer to be treated by other women in this area. I don't think that is because they are afraid of lasciviousness, usually, but because they feel as though a woman doctor will understand them better.

However. My mother used to work in a nursing home, and there were times when women residents had to be bathed by male CNAs although females were available, and they were uncomfortable with it. I think that's wrong, and that when it comes to bathing and other matters of personal hygiene, if it is at all possible they should have someone of the same sex, especially women, who feel very vulnerable in that kind of situation.
I've never seen a gynecologist who was female, luck of the draw for me, I have to go where the insurance will cover. It doesn't make any difference to me, though.
(08-16-2010, 09:34 PM)dark lancer Wrote: [ -> ]Should we Catholics be refusing to receive certain kinds of care from healthcare professionals who are not the same gender?  The most obvious concern I have is of Women's Complaints.  I have no idea what goes on in an examination by a Women's Complaints doctor (and I'm not sure I want to know), but something tells me that something is wrong about a woman allowing a male gynecologist to treat or examine her for routine things even if there is no temptation to do anything scandalous.  My mother's last gynecologist was a man who practiced for more than thirty years and she didn't seem uncomfortable about it.

My question also applies to men seeking treatment for certain things.  I don't mean something like having a female hygienist when visiting the dentist for a regular checkup, but if there are problems in or with certain areas should female nurses or doctors be asked to leave the treatment room?

Obviously in a critical situation a physician or professional of the opposite gender may be necessary as a last resort, but I'm asking about regular or urgent visits to a physician.


Not as Catholics...if you have a personal hang up about it...that's one thing...it is your right as a patient to be seen by whomever you prefer.  Healthcare professionals will oblige....but don't try to turn personal preference and personal space into a religious thing in this case....it is not.


Personally, if I were in the hospital...I would not want me giving me a bath...if you know what I mean.

On the other hand, little old Mexican ladies don't want me giving them a bath either....and hey...there are plenty of lady nurses.
My gynecologist/obstertrician is a man. When I was pregnant and had to be examined, he had his nurse do it. I guess it was his policy. But when I was in labor he was on staff and he did check me. He was very compassionate and professional. Having a male doctor didn't bother me at all.
I prefer male doctors.  I had a bad experience with a pro-abortion feminist obstetrician once.  Rationally I know that male doctors could be infected with feminism too, but I just feel better.  I guess I think of them as more dedicated to their profession and more competent too.
I've had both, and I don't have a preference...just that the dr has a great demeanor and reputation.  My primary is (or at least was the last time I checked) dr in the Dallas area who will not prescribe birth control...he's Catholic, too.  My last ob/gyn was a GREAT dr...is the only dr I know of who has the rep in the whole DFW metroplex of being completely at ease with VBAC after multiple c-secs...and I am told that he prayers for each of his patients.
Personally, I had a lot of trouble with an arm injury (which turned out to be a fracture) and some other issues which were not picked up by a female doctor, or a protestant doctor or an immigrant doctor.
So I insisted on a natural-born Catholic male doctor, and he began fixing my problems right away.
In NZ it pays to avoid immigrant doctors though, I'm not being racist, but most of our docs train and then move to Oz for better pay, and our gov imports docs from third world countries. Places like India, or Bangladesh, or Thailand. They don;t even understand hygiene in those countries, which is scary considering they allow them to practice medicine here. It's about government revenues which are generated and also a nice friendly welcoming statistic to show that we don't turn away those lovely immigrants!
Now, how can I trust my health to man who has less knowledge of medicine than I do?
Male or female I've never thought that affected their competence but I did have to see one doc who was Thai, I could only understand about half of what he said.  Hate to sound provincial but that's a problem.
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