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This is what is all about. In the end it is progress done in Seminaries that will determine the pace in which the Church will see the Tridentine Rite flourish.

http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/201...notre.html

These are good and hopeful signs.
I like the arrangement of the torchbearers facing each other during the Canon. I think it's better than a horizontal line, when there's enough room for it.

And not to detract from the Mass, I believe it was INPEFESS who said that he had never seen a Tridentine Mass without an antependium when I mentioned in another thread that Tridentine Masses are commonly celebrated without them, even though there is a rule about it. This is one example of it missing in action.
That altar is absolutely beautiful.
(09-28-2010, 05:24 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]I like the arrangement of the torchbearers facing each other during the Canon. I think it's better than a horizontal line, when there's enough room for it.

And not to detract from the Mass, I believe it was INPEFESS who said that he had never seen a Tridentine Mass without an antependium when I mentioned in another thread that Tridentine Masses are commonly celebrated without them, even though there is a rule about it. This is one example of it missing in action.

It seems that the antipendium has been removed for the Sacrifice of the Mass. Does the canon in question state that it must be on the altar during the Sacrifice of the Mass?

Also, in Western tradition, in order to prevent covering elaborate engravings on the front of some altars, sometimes the antipendium has only a 'frontlet' and does not reach all the way to the floor (though the antipendia used where I attend Mass are Jacobean frontals, so they hang all the way to the floor and cover the engravings on the altar face). Still, this looks more like an altar linen than an antipendium.
Perhaps I was mistaken in our last conversation. I thought the canon only specified that the altar was to be covered with an antipedium between Masses, when the Sacrifice of the Mass is not actively being celebrated. I thought the antipendium was to be removed leaving the altar cloth and linens remaining for the celebration of Mass. If this is incorrect, than the Masses I attend aren't doing it technically correct, either.
It will be via the monasteries and seminaries and from priest "in-the-field" whence from the Tridentine Restoration occurs.
Is the ExtraOrdinary Rite being taught at Notre Dame Seminary in New Orleans as Pope Benedict has requested or is another once a year mass to placate the trads in the area. THe Pope WANTS the Trad Latin Mass as part of every parish. PERIOD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11
(09-28-2010, 05:52 PM)INPEFESS Wrote: [ -> ]Perhaps I was mistaken in our last conversation. I thought the canon only specified that the altar was to be covered with an antipedium between Masses, when the Sacrifice of the Mass is not actively being celebrated. I thought the antipendium was to be removed leaving the altar cloth and linens remaining for the celebration of Mass. If this is incorrect, than the Masses I attend aren't doing it technically correct, either.

I've never heard this interpretation before. The symbolic reason for dressing the altar during Mass is because the altar is a symbol of Christ, and Christ ought to be clothed.

However, if the altar is very beautifully decorated, it could be interpreted that it fulfills the purpose of a covering; so says the Catholic Encyclopedia. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01353b.htm
(09-30-2010, 03:26 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-28-2010, 05:52 PM)INPEFESS Wrote: [ -> ]Perhaps I was mistaken in our last conversation. I thought the canon only specified that the altar was to be covered with an antipedium between Masses, when the Sacrifice of the Mass is not actively being celebrated. I thought the antipendium was to be removed leaving the altar cloth and linens remaining for the celebration of Mass. If this is incorrect, than the Masses I attend aren't doing it technically correct, either.

I've never heard this interpretation before. The symbolic reason for dressing the altar during Mass is because the altar is a symbol of Christ, and Christ ought to be clothed.

However, if the altar is very beautifully decorated, it could be interpreted that it fulfills the purpose of a covering; so says the Catholic Encyclopedia. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01353b.htm

Do you know the number of the canon off-hand?
(09-28-2010, 05:24 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]I like the arrangement of the torchbearers facing each other during the Canon. I think it's better than a horizontal line, when there's enough room for it.

And not to detract from the Mass, I believe it was INPEFESS who said that he had never seen a Tridentine Mass without an antependium when I mentioned in another thread that Tridentine Masses are commonly celebrated without them, even though there is a rule about it. This is one example of it missing in action.

I do not recall antipendium in the altars in Hungary. The altars were usually old, made from marble, or precious wood and carved in the front.

Here is a confirming opinion, that if the altar is from precious material and carved in the front, the antipendium is not required

http://books.google.com/books?id=UuLNAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA424&lpg=PA424&dq=antipendium&source=bl&ots=A1P3Br_u92&sig=v8RoLaCGaLs7aYql0d7xq_e03YQ&hl=en&ei=B-6kTOmsIZHqnQfp55iRAQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=7&ved=0CDYQ6AEwBg#v=onepage&q=antipendium&f=false

The Mass is beautiful.
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