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Most traditional orders like the SSPX and the FSSP have seminaries that are teeming with seminarians. 

In particular with the FSSP, I notice that they are not growing fast in terms of apostolates but are booming in seminarians in the US.  Correct me if I am wrong.  I would like to know, What will happen to the surplus of priests in the future?   

How do these orders accomodate the large influx on new priests into the order?
couldnt His Holiness intervene and assign parishes to the order??? 
When a lot of  the people who're preventing the establishment of Traditional parishes and Diocese have died from liver cancer, or whatever, and gone to meet their particular judgment, practically the only people left will be conservatives and traditionalists.

(09-30-2010, 04:17 PM)love alabama Wrote: [ -> ]In particular with the FSSP, I notice that they are not growing fast in terms of apostolates but are booming in seminarians in the US.  Correct me if I am wrong.  I would like to know, What will happen to the surplus of priests in the future?   

The FSSP aren't opening new apostolates, because they're strapped as it is.  At this point, they want to keep at least two priests living together, and thus, their growth is about maxed out.  When I was attending an FSSP parish, there were four different priests through the parish in nine months.  That's not healthy for the congregation or the priest.  And I think vocations (while still high), have leveled out some since the Summorum Pontificum was released.
So, you don't think there are no young priests kneeling at the feet of the sage liberal Bishops, ready and waiting to take up the battle cry and the banner and fight on ? Perhaps you can show us all of the Monsignors in the wings waiting at the chance to liberate the TLM ?
tim
The TLM I attended last week in Montreal (my first TLM) has a 75-year-old priest who will retire soon-ish (this particular EF mass was approved by the archbishop in 1985) and in all likelihood, an FSSP priest from Ottawa will be his successor.
This is a a generic problem. The St John Cantius Fathers have 10 priests for 2 relatively small parishes (the one what I attend have  370 registered families) and in my territorial parish one priest try to serve 4500+ registered families.

In my opinion is a short while (1-2 years) a personal prelature will be established for the traditional fraternities, canons and other organizations who are in full communion with Rome, and thus they were independent from the bishops, can open chapels anywhere.  Also there is a trend that the liberal bishops who are obstacles for the traditional Mass are retiring and substituted by more open minded ones, who call in traditional priests
If there's a surplus of priests, I assume they'll be stacking the current parishes or chapels. I know the Fraternity currently tries to have each community have at least two priests together in order to have some semblance of community life. Ideally, no church should have only one priest. Deacons and religious brothers would be even more ideal.
(09-30-2010, 04:17 PM)love alabama Wrote: [ -> ]Most traditional orders like the SSPX and the FSSP have seminaries that are teeming with seminarians. 

In particular with the FSSP, I notice that they are not growing fast in terms of apostolates but are booming in seminarians in the US.  Correct me if I am wrong.  I would like to know, What will happen to the surplus of priests in the future?   

How do these orders accomodate the large influx on new priests into the order?

There are plenty of places asking (begging) them for priests.  They'll have no trouble finding homes for them as fast as they ordain them.  We only have one FSSP priest now, which they don't like to do; but in an area where many diocesan parishes share a single priest between 2-3 different churches, it seems greedy to expect two priests for a small community!
This is hardly a problem whereas the FSSP brings in 20-25 men each year at their seminary in Lincoln, Nebraska by the end of the 7 years of training your lucky if 2 or 3 men have made it. The Seminary being overcrowded is really not a true gauge of the future. Their are more opportunities since the Summorum Pontificum came out and because so few are ordained they cant fill the need.
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