FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums

Full Version: Lesson for 21st Sunday after Pentecost -- Purgatory
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Pages: 1 2
VOL. 5 = THE CHRISTIAN’S LAST END
Sermon by Fr. Francis Hunolt

TWENTY-FIRST SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST
Purgatory after Death

And his lord being angry delivered him to the torturers, until he paid all the debt.”
—St. Matthew 18:34.


What a hard sentence for that servant! Yet it was a merciful punishment for that merciless, ungrateful
man, who deserved to be treated with far greater severity, for though he was to be punished, yet it was
only until he should pay the whole debt.

Hence this punishment was not to last always, but till he should have paid all he owed his lord. Thus he
had the hope of being one day freed from prison and torture.

Here we have a vivid picture of the prison which we Catholics call Purgatory, in which the souls of those
who have not sufficiently satisfied the justice of God for their sins are confined, that they may be tortured,
not forever, but only for a time and until they have completely paid all they owe the divine justice.

Each one of us should think, how will it be with me after death? Shall I be immediately translated into heaven,
or shall I be sent to the prison of Purgatory to be tormented?  In all probability the latter will be the case. This
thought should urge us to do all we can to help the Poor Souls, who are actually there now.

I. Every one of us has just reason to fear a severe punishment after death.
II. Every one of us should show mercy to the Poor Souls; because they who refuse to do so may expect
a Purgatory without mercy.

I. There is no one who does not daily do something to earn purgatory; for what are we, and where are
we now on this earth?

Poor, frail mortals, inclined to evil, exposed to countless dangers and occasions of sin, nay, we stain our
lives with many actual sins and faults; for we are of the number of those of whom St. John says: “If we say
that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us”  -- I John 1:8

In truth if we go through the whole day, from morning till night, we shall hardly find a quarter of an
hour that is quite free from some fault or another. Curiosity of eyes and ears, sensuality of taste and
touch, want of restraint over the tongue, idle, flattering, lying, fault-finding, quarrelsome, sarcastic,
contradictory talk; proud, ambitious, suspicious, impure thoughts, that are fully or half deliberate;
intemperance in eating, drinking, and sleep; discontent and impatience in adversity; a wrong intention in
outward actions; vanity in dress, manners, and demeanor; want of restraint and consideration in company;
human respect, that drives us to do or omit what we should not do or omit; useless squandering of
precious time, culpable ignorance, neglecting the duties of our state although in small things; not fulfilling
the obligations of Christian charity; leading others into sin; giving scandal through carelessness, rejecting
the divine inspirations, etc.

These are small things according to our ideas; but our lives are filled with them; they are as it were the daily
bread of even pious Christians. Wherever one turns he finds some fault or other that he has committed. And
how many sins do we not commit that escape our notice, that we do not acknowledge and are not aware of,
although they are all clearly recognized by the all-seeing eye of God and written down in the great account-book
in their minutest details.

Even our good works will be found to be mixed with faults and imperfections.

Prayer said with fully or half deliberate distractions;devotions performed with coldness and tepidity; hearing Mass,
and receiving holy Communion with little reverence, or fervor; these pious exercises that we daily perform to honor
God, to increase our merit, and to gain heaven— these very works serve at the same time to fan the flames of purgatory
in order to chastise us.

I will say nothing of the grievous sins that are committed from the first dawn of reason, through the
succeeding years of youth and manhood; sins of all kinds in thought and desire, in word, and act, and
conversation, and omission.

How many adults are there who can say that they are of the number of those happy souls who have never
been guilty of a mortal sin in their lives? I will suppose that we have blotted out of the book of God’s justice all the mortal
sins of our past lives, so that we are now admitted to the favor and friendship of God.

What becomes of the terrible temporal punishment we still owe the divine justice for those sins that we have committed
and repented of?

The God of holiness and justice requires for these and even for the small daily faults we fall into, the
most complete and perfect satisfaction, no fault is so small as not to deserve its punishment.

If we do not make this atonement during life, we must atone for those sins in the next life by suffering in our own persons
and by purgatorial punishment. For no one can be admitted into heaven and to the sight of God
who is not perfectly free from even the least stain. Alas! what will become of us? Is there any one who
will dare to say that he shall escape purgatory?

And what do we imagine we shall have to suffer for those almost countless sins and faults? Do we
think they are but small matters, and that God does not consider them so exactly?

Ah, no! The God of mercy and goodness, even in this life, where mercy holds the foremost rank, where punishments
willingly endured are united with the infinite merits of the Passion and death of our Lord, and therefore have a great atoning
power over and above their own merit—even in this life God has sometimes punished most severely small sins committed
by his faithful servants.

Thus, for instance, the half deliberate doubt on the part of Moses, who hesitated about striking the rock with his rod, was the
cause of his being excluded from the promised land; an act of curiosity on the part of Lot’s wife, who looked round to see the
burning city of Sodom, was enough to cause her to be turned into a pillar of salt. The carelessness of Oza in putting forth his
hand to support the ark of the covenant drew down on him the punishment of a sudden death. The silly vanity of David, who
wished to know the number of his people, brought the plague amongst them, which in three days carried off seventy thousand men.

Now, I say, if God, who is otherwise so merciful, inflicts such severe punishments on even his faithful servants for small faults,
alas! how strict will he be in the next life, where his justice alone, untempered by mercy, shall wield the rod? where suffering is
not united with the merits of Christ, but is simply endured by a mere creature, a suffering that, no matter how keen it is, can hardly
be compared to an offence offered to God.

For that very reason we should be more active in helping the Poor Souls, for they who show no mercy
to them shall be punished without mercy in purgatory. “For with the same measure,” says Christ, “that
you shall mete withal, it shall be measured to you again” (Luke 6: 38).

If you have shown no charity towards the suffering souls, there will be no one after your death who will think of showing mercy to you.

There are many examples to prove this. We read of souls that have been over a hundred years in
Purgatory and had not one to pray for them, and that through a most just decree of God; and of souls for
whom many prayers and masses were offered without doing them any good, because they had not helped
the Poor Souls during their lives.

Remember this: Not every good act that is done for the benefit of a certain soul actually helps that soul, otherwise the rich, and
especially kings and princes, would be well off indeed, for sometimes a thousand masses are said for them.

Ah, no! quite different is the distribution made by the justice of God, who is not bound to accept the payment offered by a stranger
for the debt contracted by any soul. You, he will say, who during your life did so little for the Poor Souls, you do not deserve this mass,
this alms, those prayers that your friends are now sending after you; all these things shall be given over to others who are more
deserving of them on account of the charity they practiced during their lives; but you must pay at your own cost the debts you have incurred.

It is related of a soldier who on his death-bed asked his grandson to sell his horse, and have masses said
with the money for the repose of his soul. The grandson, partly through neglect and partly because he
wished to keep the horse for himself, as it was a fine one, did not fulfill his grandfather’s request. After a
lapse of six months the deceased appeared to him; “you faithless fellow,” he said to him with an angry
countenance, “on account of your negligence I have had to suffer in Purgatory all this time, and now the
mercy of God has caused me to find help elsewhere. But as for you, by a just decree you will die soon,
and your soul will come to this place of torments, where it will suffer until you have atoned, not only for
your own sins, but also for mine, for you will have to complete the punishment that I should have
suffered, if God’s mercy had not found means to help me.” This threat was fulfilled to the letter; the
grandson died soon after.

This should be a lesson to those children and heirs who neglect to carry out the pious wishes of their deceased friends, or
for some cause or another defer complying with them.

In the same measure will chastisement be measured out to them. “Judgment without mercy to him that bath not
done mercy” (James 2 : 13); Purgatory without mercy to him who has not shown mercy to the Poor Souls.

http://www.alcazar.net/21stSundayAfterPentecost.html
Source: http://www.JMJsite.com.

What utterly unfounded hogwash!
(10-16-2010, 12:55 PM)Melkite Wrote: [ -> ]What utterly unfounded hogwash!

Are you out of your mind?
(10-16-2010, 12:55 PM)Melkite Wrote: [ -> ]What utterly unfounded hogwash!

Must a traditional, orthodox sermon have to be defended?

Matthew 13:11 Who answered and said to them: Because to you it is given to know the mysteries of the kingdom of heaven: but to them it is not given.

John 12:40  ... because Isaias said again: He hath blinded their eyes, and hardened their heart, that they should not see with their eyes, nor understand with their heart, and be converted

Romans 11:8  As it is written:  God hath given them the spirit of insensibility; eyes that they should not see; and ears that they should not hear, until this present day.

(10-16-2010, 05:26 AM)Vincentius Wrote: [ -> ]Here we have a vivid picture of the prison which we Catholics call Purgatory, in which the souls of those
who have not sufficiently satisfied the justice of God for their sins are confined, that they may be tortured,
not forever, but only for a time and until they have completely paid all they owe the divine justice.

Not sufficiently satisfied the justice of God?  I'm sorry, do you worship a legalistic Judge, or a lover of your soul?

I. Every one of us has just reason to fear a severe punishment after death.

Fear is not in charity: but perfect charity casteth out fear, because fear hath pain. And he that feareth, is not perfected in charity.

Prayer said with fully or half deliberate distractions;devotions performed with coldness and tepidity; hearing Mass,
and receiving holy Communion with little reverence, or fervor; these pious exercises that we daily perform to honor
God, to increase our merit, and to gain heaven— these very works serve at the same time to fan the flames of purgatory
in order to chastise us.

You believe that we will suffer torment for something as little, and uncontrollable, as being distracted in prayer?  You mindless fool, how sad it is you have never known the love of God!

What becomes of the terrible temporal punishment we still owe the divine justice for those sins that we have committed
and repented of?

What terrible temporal punishment did the father bestow upon the prodigal son?  He didn't because God's nature is one of mercy superceding justice!  You blind fool!  You have whittled away at the true God and created for yourself an idol to whom you must repay an unpayable debt!  Pharisee!

The God of holiness and justice requires for these and even for the small daily faults we fall into, the
most complete and perfect satisfaction, no fault is so small as not to deserve its punishment.

The God of mercy forgives the debt that we cannot pay!  How did you fall so far from the Gospel?

Now, I say, if God, who is otherwise so merciful, inflicts such severe punishments on even his faithful servants for small faults,
alas! how strict will he be in the next life, where his justice alone, untempered by mercy, shall wield the rod? where suffering is
not united with the merits of Christ, but is simply endured by a mere creature, a suffering that, no matter how keen it is, can hardly
be compared to an offence offered to God.

In the next life his justice will be untempered by mercy?!?  You sad fool, who told you God's mercy is confined to this life?  You poor blasphemer, if you think in the next life God is a judge and judge alone, you have been sadly deceived.

There are many examples to prove this. We read of souls that have been over a hundred years in
Purgatory and had not one to pray for them, and that through a most just decree of God; and of souls for
whom many prayers and masses were offered without doing them any good, because they had not helped
the Poor Souls during their lives.

Where do we read of this?  In private revelation that can in no way be verified?

It is related of a soldier who on his death-bed asked his grandson to sell his horse, and have masses said
with the money for the repose of his soul. The grandson, partly through neglect and partly because he
wished to keep the horse for himself, as it was a fine one, did not fulfill his grandfather’s request. After a
lapse of six months the deceased appeared to him; “you faithless fellow,” he said to him with an angry
countenance, “on account of your negligence I have had to suffer in Purgatory all this time, and now the
mercy of God has caused me to find help elsewhere. But as for you, by a just decree you will die soon,
and your soul will come to this place of torments, where it will suffer until you have atoned, not only for
your own sins, but also for mine, for you will have to complete the punishment that I should have
suffered, if God’s mercy had not found means to help me.” This threat was fulfilled to the letter; the
grandson died soon after.

Is our theology of God's mercy and justice now relegated to anecdote?
Melkite,

Your responses to a sermon once delivered in circa the1880's by a Catholic piriest of the caliber of Fr. Goffine,or Fr. Michael Muller, Bishop George Hay, et al., are ipse dixits -- and calling him a "fool" betrays your lamentable ignorance of the true Catholic faith, and further shows that you are inculacated in the modernist teaching of the present regime, precisely the modernism condemned by St. Pius X.  Who is the "blind fool"?  This priest who explains the Gospel of St. Matthew or you who read it with modernist eyes?  Before you must even comment and spew your diatribe, take a book on Purgatory and read it with devotion because the doctrine of Purgatory is exactly what is told by the Holy Scriptures, which has already been interpreted by the Magisterium and is not subject to dissent.  Here are a few books:  "Read and Rue it"; Purgatory Explained by Fr. Schouppe, S.J., Preparatio for death by St. Alphonsus Liguori, Dante Alhegueri, et al.

Go here to make a daily pilgrimage to Purgatory together with the Sacred Heart of Jesus and experience what it is lkie to be there, and why are souls there, some until the end of the world (harsh punishment?), others are abandoned and are destitute of spiritual aid because NOBODY prays for them (sounds like people like you):  http://www.alcazar.net/daily_pilgrimage_...atory.html

Also I have a write up on Purgatory which is a discussion (debate) I am having with an Evangekical (Protestant), who debunks, rejects and denys that Purgatory exists, which is so glaringly spoken of in the Bible.  I'll be posting it in my website.
.
A very good lesson to remember.
I'm not saying Purgatory doesn't exist.  I'm saying, it's not a place of torment.  Obviously, nothing impure can enter heaven, and if someone dies before they have been perfected, some kind of purification must take place after death.  No where does the Bible, as you seem to imply, suggest that this purification is a torment to the person receiving it.  No where does the Bible suggest that it is similar to hell in anyway.  And this was my primary concern with the homily, no where does the Bible suggest that Christ will forsake mercy once this life is over.  The God who forgives the sinner while he is still a long way off cannot then also demand account of every jot and tittle of wrong done and demand repayment.  They two are mutually exclusive.  Latins worship a Judge, not a merciful lover.  Virtually everything in this homily was based on private revelation.  There is also private revelation that says once you confess your sins, Jesus can't remember them.  So, he can't remember them, but when you die he's still going to make you pay for them?  Hogwash!  Purgatory is not a place to repay the sins that you commited, but to purify you from the fallen desires that led you to choose your sins to begin with!
(10-18-2010, 09:40 AM)Melkite Wrote: [ -> ]I'm not saying Purgatory doesn't exist.  I'm saying, it's not a place of torment.  Obviously, nothing impure can enter heaven, and if someone dies before they have been perfected, some kind of purification must take place after death.  No where does the Bible, as you seem to imply, suggest that this purification is a torment to the person receiving it.  No where does the Bible suggest that it is similar to hell in anyway.  And this was my primary concern with the homily, no where does the Bible suggest that Christ will forsake mercy once this life is over.  The God who forgives the sinner while he is still a long way off cannot then also demand account of every jot and tittle of wrong done and demand repayment.  They two are mutually exclusive.  Latins worship a Judge, not a merciful lover.  Virtually everything in this homily was based on private revelation.  There is also private revelation that says once you confess your sins, Jesus can't remember them.  So, he can't remember them, but when you die he's still going to make you pay for them?  Hogwash!  Purgatory is not a place to repay the sins that you commited, but to purify you from the fallen desires that led you to choose your sins to begin with!

I didn't see your signature until now that you have a beef with the Latins (Roman Catholics in the Western Church).  I wonder what it is. 

I see your problem with the doctrine of Purgatory as confusing divine Mercy with divine Justice.  To you they are one and the same.  No, not so.  God's Mercy will save the repentant sinner from damnation, even at the last moment, and it is extended even after death where His Mercy will allow a soul to be relased of his suffering through the prayers said for him..  However, divine Justice demands payment in reparation, to expeiate the penalty attached to sin.  A forgiven mortal sin demands greater expiation than a venial sin.   There are countless scriptural references, here's a few:  Matthew 5:26; 12:36; 18:34.    Another confusion:  purification.   How is gold purified from its impurities?  By fire, isn't it.  The length of purification depends on the impurities.  So why not for the imperfect soul?   Private revelation merely attests what the Bible says.  There are accounts that cannot simply be dismissed as "hogwash!"  Souls have appeared as clothed in fire.  A palm on fire is imprnted (burned into) the front page of a book, and so on.   So there is true fire in Purgatory.   One of the gifts of the Holy Ghost is the fear of the Lord, which implies pious fear for His divine Justice.   The fear of the Lord is the beginning of Wisdom, and it is wisdom that guide us to live our lives as perfect as possible and thus avoid offending God.
Was it St. Ephrem the Syrian? who said (paraphrased)

"Don't say God is just.  NEVER say God is just.  If God were just, you would be immediately translated to Hell the moment you committed the tiniest sin.  God is not just, but rather, he is merciful."  So, no, I'm not confusing God's justice with his mercy, I'm saying his mercy, both in this life and the next, supercedes his justice, whereas many trad Latins believe that his justice supercedes his mercy.  It is this supercession of justice that allows one to believe in the blasphemous, though perfectly logical, concept of children's limbo, for example.  However, it is the true supercession of mercy that allows one to not be held responsible for an accurate repayment of every last sin committed.
Pages: 1 2