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Thanks to the Information Age it is easy to investigate a parish and get a sense for what it's all about.  Websites along with the weekly bulletin and sometimes the Mass itself are available to anyone interested.  The old adage of if it walks like a duck and quacks is usually true.  Here are some of the red flags I spot.  Are there others that indicate a modernist parish?

- Confession by appointment only
- strong Social Justice committee
- the word "Welcoming"
- the word "Catholic" absent or limited usage
- no Exposition or Benediction
- liberal amount of EMHCs and other 'ministries'

The main sign for me is Confession.  A parish with daily Confession (prior to Mass) is most likely on the right path.  Anytime I've gone to a Novus Ordo Saturday afternoon Confession I'm either the only one there or a few other people, yet every TLM I've attended has a lineup outside the Confessional prior to Mass.
Some others I've observed:

- No kneelers
- Tabernacle hidden in the corner of the Church or in some obscure room
- Having a building that can't be identified as a Church from the outside
- Having the priest or lay "MC" tell everyone at the beginning of Mass "now rise and greet the people around you"
Oh yeah, church websites and especially the online bulletins tell a lot. Some examples I've seen:

"Catholic Community" rather than "Parish"
Lifeteen Mass. Also some program called "The Edge" for junior high
The schedule for Eucharistic Ministers is posted online
A large list of dubious "ministries"
Another term I've seen used at Novus Ordo churches is:

a "Liturgical Committee" - usually headed up by a woman. 

Besides what has been already pointed out, I'll add the following observations that I have seen in the normal parish life of my country:

- The word "Eucharist" is always used instead of "Mass" or "Holy Mass".
- Almost no one kneels in front of the tabernacle, clergy included. Belief in the Real Presence is a minority.
- Many priests never wear all the required vestments to say Mass.
- The vast majority of the priests never wear cassocks or clerical dresses. Instead, they're virtually indistinguishable from the crowd.
- The churches built after 1970 can seldom be identified as such in terms of architecture.
- The vast majority of priests dwell on social and political issues alone in their homilies. When religion is mentioned, it's always the "God loves you" ramblings.
- There are always women inside the sanctuary, including altargirls and female EMHC.
- No women cover their heads, except for some very old and dying ladies.
- No visible confessionals inside the church. If available, confessions must be done under appointment.
- Everyone (99%) at Mass receives Holy Communion. Either everyone is holier than in the past or, more likely, most people aren't properly disposed.
- The vast majority receives standing and in the hand.
- In some parishes, there are literally armies of EHMC. Frankly, it's pathetic.
- All the music is cheesy and vulgar.
- The catechesis of both clergy and laity is appalling. Heresy is widespread and, in some cases, openly professed.

Thank God for Vatican II! We're so much better now!
I'm not sure that confession by appointment only should be included-- with the crisis in vocations, especially internationally, parishioners may have to give notice so the priest can make the drive, etc.  In Western Europe this is often the case, where as many as 5 parishes share a priest or a couple of priests (I've read accounts of this happening in provincial France)...

(10-25-2010, 08:46 AM)Ockham Wrote: [ -> ]Thanks to the Information Age it is easy to investigate a parish and get a sense for what it's all about.  Websites along with the weekly bulletin and sometimes the Mass itself are available to anyone interested.  The old adage of if it walks like a duck and quacks is usually true.  Here are some of the red flags I spot.  Are there others that indicate a modernist parish?

- Confession by appointment only
- strong Social Justice committee
- the word "Welcoming"
- the word "Catholic" absent or limited usage
- no Exposition or Benediction
- liberal amount of EMHCs and other 'ministries'

The main sign for me is Confession.  A parish with daily Confession (prior to Mass) is most likely on the right path.  Anytime I've gone to a Novus Ordo Saturday afternoon Confession I'm either the only one there or a few other people, yet every TLM I've attended has a lineup outside the Confessional prior to Mass.
If you are checking them out online, read the PDF'd parish bulletins if they are there.  Cheesy "spiritual" art on the front that looks as if it were stolen from a calendar? - dead giveaway!!!!!!!

Also, if there is a soundtrack of "On Eagle's Wings" playing on the site.......that is Nature's way of saying "STAY AWAY".

Among previous points mentioned, I second "non-use of 'Catholic'" and a "LifeTeen" schedule.
Is the obverse true, that a parish with scheduled confessional times tends to be non-modernist?

- Stewardship this and Stewardship that without addressing the conversion of the soul.
- Announcement before Mass, during Mass and just before the final blessing.
- Socializing and talking before and after Mass

Great lists all.
*The post-Mass round of applause .... I am not sure if that is meant to recogize musicians or pat each other on the back...that's a give away as to the type of parish

*the drum set on the altar where the priest and deacon wear the janet jackson style headset/microphone as the priest raffles off his mustang converible....saw that once...no chapel veils there.

*chair set up on place formerly know as a high alter ... priest in the center with chairs for servers on either side...while our Blessed Lord is placed in the corner somewhere (the tabernacle is in the "bad jesus in the corner setting"....that is very sad)

*Stations of the Cross is some form of abstract art

*lots and lots of ferns behind/around alter can be a tip off, too.
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