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I was chatting casually with my manager, a prottie, this morning, and he said that (paraphrasing), "Sin is sin. It's all equal in the eyes of God. It doesn't matter if you steal a stick of gum or murder someone, it's all the same." I then reminded him of 1 John 5:16-17:

"He that knoweth his brother to sin a sin which is not to death, let him ask, and life shall be given to him, who sinneth not to death. There is a sin unto death: for that I say not that any man ask. All iniquity is sin. And there is a sin unto death."

He then stated that those weren't the words of Christ. I reminded him that there is no error in Scripture, and he agreed, saying "Well, it's a tough one." Protties see what they want to see, yet they're blind. I'm guessing others in the Tank have run across this, too. Please discuss.
Oh yeah, I hear that from most Protestants and those brought up Protestant. I try to point out that the punishment for murder is far more severe than for a speeding ticket. And if man-made laws can be just, then why wouldn't God, Who is Justice be even more so. I think they like the "sin is sin" because then it doesn't matter if they rob a bank or nick pens from work. "oh, sin is sin and Jesus' just covers it up anyway"
Most people like this do not seriously study properly, so they are full of inaccuracies. However, it does have support:

James 2:10 Wrote:And whosoever shall keep the whole law, but offend in one point, is become guilty of all.

This doesn't say that every sin is the same, but that a violation of the Law is a violation of the Law, not parts of it.

The degrees of sin are clearly marked in scripture:

Luke 12:47-48 Wrote:And that servant who knew the will of his lord, and prepared not himself, and did not according to his will, shall be beaten with many stripes.

But he that knew not, and did things worthy of stripes, shall be beaten with few stripes. And unto whomsoever much is given, of him much shall be required: and to whom they have committed much, of him they will demand the more.
Clearly, knowledge of what is right and wrong is a major factor in guilt/severity of a sin.

(10-29-2010, 04:32 PM)Rosarium Wrote: [ -> ]Most people like this do not seriously study properly, so they are full of inaccuracies. However, it does have support:

James 2:10 Wrote:And whosoever shall keep the whole law, but offend in one point, is become guilty of all.

This doesn't say that every sin is the same, but that a violation of the Law is a violation of the Law, not parts of it.

In that case, isn't it like going ten miles over the speeding limit and going thirty over?
I John 5:16 is the relevant verse. This verse was written on the ground at campus here once and my friends had a discussion about it. Good thing we were all Catholic (the ones discussing, at least)


[16] He that knoweth his brother to sin a sin which is not to death, let him ask, and life shall be given to him, who sinneth not to death. There is a sin unto death: for that I say not that any man ask. [17] All iniquity is sin. And there is a sin unto death. [18] We know that whosoever is born of God, sinneth not: but the generation of God preserveth him, and the wicked one toucheth him not. [19] We know that we are of God, and the whole world is seated in wickedness. [20] And we know that the Son of God is come: and he hath given us understanding that we may know the true God, and may be in his true Son. This is the true God and life eternal.

[16] "A sin which is not to death"... It is hard to determine what St. John here calls a sin which is not to death, and a sin which is unto death. The difference can not be the same as betwixt sins that are called venial and mortal: for he says, that if a man pray for his brother, who commits a sin that is not to death, life shall be given him: therefore such a one had before lost the life of grace, and been guilty of what is commonly called a mortal sin. And when he speaks of a sin that is unto death, and adds these words, for that I say not that any man ask, it cannot be supposed that St. John would say this of every mortal sin, but only of some heinous sins, which are very seldom remitted, because such sinners very seldom repent. By a sin therefore which is unto death, interpreters commonly understand a wilfull apostasy from the faith, and from the known truth, when a sinner, hardened by his own ingratitude, becomes deaf to all admonitions, will do nothing for himself, but runs on to a final impenitence. Nor yet does St. John say, that such a sin is never remitted, or cannot be remitted, but only has these words, for that I say not that any man ask the remission: that is, though we must pray for all sinners whatsoever, yet men can not pray for such sinners with such a confidence of obtaining always their petitions, as St. John said before, ver. 14. Whatever exposition we follow on this verse, our faith teacheth us from the holy scriptures, that God desires not the death of any sinner, but that he be converted and live, Ezech. 33. 11. Though men's sins be as red as scarlet, they shall become as white as snow, Isa. 3. 18. It is the will of God that every one come to the knowledge of the truth, and be saved. There is no sin so great but which God is willing to forgive, and has left a power in his church to remit the most enormous sins: so that no sinner need despair of pardon, nor will any sinner perish, but by his own fault.

[16] "A sin unto death"... Some understand this of final impenitence, or of dying in mortal sin; which is the only sin that never can be remitted. But, it is probable, he may also comprise under this name, the sin of apostasy from the faith, and some other such heinous sins as are seldom and hardly remitted: and therefore he gives little encouragement, to such as pray for these sinners, to expect what they ask.

[19] "The whole world is seated in wickedness"... That is, a great part of the world. It may also signify, is under the wicked one, meaning the devil, who is elsewhere called the prince of this world, that is, of all the wicked. John 12. 31.

[20] "And may be in his true Son"... He is, or this is the true God, and life eternal. Which words are a clear proof of Christ's divinity, and as such made use of by the ancient fathers.
(10-29-2010, 04:33 PM)Pilgrim Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-29-2010, 04:32 PM)Rosarium Wrote: [ -> ]Most people like this do not seriously study properly, so they are full of inaccuracies. However, it does have support:

James 2:10 Wrote:And whosoever shall keep the whole law, but offend in one point, is become guilty of all.

This doesn't say that every sin is the same, but that a violation of the Law is a violation of the Law, not parts of it.

In that case, isn't it like going ten miles over the speeding limit and going thirty over?
Well, both are violations of the traffic law (or whatever). Sometimes, as a joke, I refer to absolutes as "a little bit", such as "a little bit asleep" or "a little bit dead", etc.

For the law, it is a reflection of God's Will, and God is One. So, the totality of the Law is to be followed as best as one can (to the extent of one's knowledge and ability).

The error of the protestant is still there, just that there are other aspects of sin to be examined too. The protestant is try to simplify God into something he can understand and control. He is uncomfortable with a God beyond his understanding (as God is), and uncomfortable with the actual meaning of scripture, so they try to simplify what they can't ignore.