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Full Version: Pope's Preacher: Has Unitarianism Infected the Catholic Church?
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Cantalamessa swims in a sea of post-VTwo ambiguity.
So does the Pope hear about these sort of crazy situations? Do liturgical and theological aberrations reach his ears, or what?
(11-03-2010, 11:29 PM)Bakuryokuso Wrote: [ -> ]So does the Pope hear about these sort of crazy situations? Do liturgical and theological aberrations reach his ears, or what?

I don't think the author of that piece was really exaggerating Cantalamessa's point of view very much based on what I saw. 
(10-30-2010, 12:56 PM)Augstine Baker Wrote: [ -> ]Father Raniero Cantalamessa, a Franciscan priest and preacher to the Papacy in the Vatican, has been preaching, sharing and advocating for Christian unity throughout the Global Body of Christ for the past ten years. His belief that we, believers in Christ Jesus, can be unified regardless of our doctrinal differences has infected hundreds of thousands of Christians with the hope that the gap between Catholics and Protestants, though unique in our forms of worship, can be bridged by a mutual love, honor and respect that Christ declared would be the very symbol that would brand us His Disciples to the world (John 13:35).

Practically speaking, I have no idea what such a "unity" could possibly look like if the end goal is for each group to retain its unique doctrines and "forms of worship."  Huh?  Aside from warm fuzzy gatherings like this, wouldn't everyone then just go back and do things their own way in their own community?

As a protestant, I was never anti-catholic, but for a time I had the misconception that we were all doing the same thing, just that the catholics liked liturgy (I had no real concept of what the liturgy was for) instead of "contemporary praise and worship."  In fact, it took me at least a year after I started attending a N.O. Mass to figure out that there was a sacrifice/offering going on  :o I have a feeling that most of the people going to this, whether protestant or Catholic, have the same misconception.

At least with some sort of ecumenical dialogue there would be some discussion of similarities and differences in doctrine, but this amounts to some sort of Christian agnosticism, as if to say "we all believe in Christ, but we can't really say for sure what else is true so we won't worry about it."
(11-04-2010, 01:42 PM)iona_scribe Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-30-2010, 12:56 PM)Augstine Baker Wrote: [ -> ]Father Raniero Cantalamessa, a Franciscan priest and preacher to the Papacy in the Vatican, has been preaching, sharing and advocating for Christian unity throughout the Global Body of Christ for the past ten years. His belief that we, believers in Christ Jesus, can be unified regardless of our doctrinal differences has infected hundreds of thousands of Christians with the hope that the gap between Catholics and Protestants, though unique in our forms of worship, can be bridged by a mutual love, honor and respect that Christ declared would be the very symbol that would brand us His Disciples to the world (John 13:35).

Practically speaking, I have no idea what such a "unity" could possibly look like if the end goal is for each group to retain its unique doctrines and "forms of worship."   Huh?  Aside from warm fuzzy gatherings like this, wouldn't everyone then just go back and do things their own way in their own community?

As a protestant, I was never anti-catholic, but for a time I had the misconception that we were all doing the same thing, just that the catholics liked liturgy (I had no real concept of what the liturgy was for) instead of "contemporary praise and worship."  In fact, it took me at least a year after I started attending a N.O. Mass to figure out that there was a sacrifice/offering going on  :o I have a feeling that most of the people going to this, whether protestant or Catholic, have the same misconception.

At least with some sort of ecumenical dialogue there would be some discussion of similarities and differences in doctrine, but this amounts to some sort of Christian agnosticism, as if to say "we all believe in Christ, but we can't really say for sure what else is true so we won't worry about it."

I was so disgusted by Cantalamessa's appearance, I could barely speak.  I was astounded by such infantile self-promotion on the part of the event's organizers and the various pentecostal, lutheran and other protestants who came for this talk.  Maybe more later. 
(11-04-2010, 01:49 PM)Augstine Baker Wrote: [ -> ]
(11-04-2010, 01:42 PM)iona_scribe Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-30-2010, 12:56 PM)Augstine Baker Wrote: [ -> ]Father Raniero Cantalamessa, a Franciscan priest and preacher to the Papacy in the Vatican, has been preaching, sharing and advocating for Christian unity throughout the Global Body of Christ for the past ten years. His belief that we, believers in Christ Jesus, can be unified regardless of our doctrinal differences has infected hundreds of thousands of Christians with the hope that the gap between Catholics and Protestants, though unique in our forms of worship, can be bridged by a mutual love, honor and respect that Christ declared would be the very symbol that would brand us His Disciples to the world (John 13:35).

Practically speaking, I have no idea what such a "unity" could possibly look like if the end goal is for each group to retain its unique doctrines and "forms of worship."   Huh?  Aside from warm fuzzy gatherings like this, wouldn't everyone then just go back and do things their own way in their own community?

As a protestant, I was never anti-catholic, but for a time I had the misconception that we were all doing the same thing, just that the catholics liked liturgy (I had no real concept of what the liturgy was for) instead of "contemporary praise and worship."  In fact, it took me at least a year after I started attending a N.O. Mass to figure out that there was a sacrifice/offering going on  :o I have a feeling that most of the people going to this, whether protestant or Catholic, have the same misconception.

At least with some sort of ecumenical dialogue there would be some discussion of similarities and differences in doctrine, but this amounts to some sort of Christian agnosticism, as if to say "we all believe in Christ, but we can't really say for sure what else is true so we won't worry about it."

I was so disgusted by Cantalamessa's appearance, I could barely speak.   I was astounded by such infantile self-promotion on the part of the event's organizers and the various pentecostal, lutheran and other protestants who came for this talk.  Maybe more later.   

Agreed; he was way out of line, acting as if he had the authority to speak for the whole Catholic Church on such matters.  Not to mention further confusing people who don't really understand what the Church teaches.
Anyone read "Behind the Lodge Door" by Paul Fisher (RIP)?

It's extremely sobering, and if you're expecting tinfoil masonic conspiracy theories you're in for a surprise. Fisher certainly was, as he wasn't researching freemasons originally.

He discusses and undiscussed topic, not masons, but Unitarian influence of all things.

Trust me, it's compelling.

You can get it from Tan books (at least).

He's also my daughter's Godfather's Godfather Smile
Yes, the more audacious Modernists are becoming more and more expressive of the logical conclusions of their teachings: eventual apostasy. As Vincentius said, these professions give meaning to the confusing words of Lumen Gentium. It is a shame that so few are willing to acknowledge the danger of the new theology which gave rise to a new religion grounded in the Novus Ordo and accelerated by the "Spirit of Vatican II."
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