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Last night one of the monsignors of the diocese sat in on this quasi-heretical prayer group I'm in (probably to stop me from arguing against Universalism again), and near the end there was a very brief discussion on the advantages and disadvantages of the NO.  The monsignor agreed with me that the priest in the Latin Mass does not have his back to the tabernacle and that the altar area was made more sacred by the altar rail as advantages of the Latin Mass, but also said that the NO made it easier on elderly priests; the monsignor is over 75 years old and said that for many years genuflecting even once had been difficult for him, and that he'd never be able to genuflect as many times as is required in the Latin Mass.  Another woman in the group said that her mother would not approach the altar rail for Communion near the end of her life because she was unable to kneel and did not want to receive while standing.

What the monsignor told me about being an EMHC I still do not understand: that an EMHC shares in the responsibilities of the priest.  I challenged by asking how an ordinary person can be worthy of even touching the body of Christ, but he said that even priests are unworthy.
An elderly, retired bishop said the Mass for us on St. Therese of Liseux's feast day, and he refrained from genuflecting, giving a deep bow instead. Several elderly women at Mass each week don't kneel, and the announcement before Mass always states: "kneeling, if able, at the altar rail, and always on the tongue".

Maybe these aren't allowed, but they seem like common sense solutions to such issues.
I had wondered about bowing as an alternative to genuflecting but I never got to ask.
(11-02-2010, 07:28 PM)dark lancer Wrote: [ -> ]I challenged by asking how an ordinary person can be worthy of even touching the body of Christ, but he said that even priests are unworthy.

Yes, but unlike ordinary people, priests are ordained. They are men set apart from the rest of the Christian people for the service of God. Their hands are consecrated: what they bless is blessed, what they consecrate is consecrated. That's why before Vatican II only clerics could touch the sacred species and the sacred vessels.
(11-02-2010, 08:50 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: [ -> ]
(11-02-2010, 07:28 PM)dark lancer Wrote: [ -> ]I challenged by asking how an ordinary person can be worthy of even touching the body of Christ, but he said that even priests are unworthy.

Yes, but unlike ordinary people, priests are ordained. They are men set apart from the rest of the Christian people for the service of God. Their hands are consecrated: what they bless is blessed, what they consecrate is consecrated. That's why before Vatican II only clerics could touch the sacred species and the sacred vessels.

Well said.
Sounds like a dumb argument to me, since a priest who has major health problems should be able to omit the genuflections even in the traditional Mass. Imagine: if the reverse were fully true, a wheelchair-bound priest would be effectively out of a job!

Quote:Another woman in the group said that her mother would not approach the altar rail for Communion near the end of her life because she was unable to kneel and did not want to receive while standing.

In cases like that, the minister should have a special arrangement for bringing holy Communion to the lady, even if it means stepping outside the sanctuary gate.
A little common sense applies here!  gg
The priest at my chapel is, I believe, in his mid-70's and has a hard time genuflecting - mostly at High Mass during the incensing of the altar (he's got bad knees).  He manages to genuflect during low Mass without much trouble,  but during High Mass he has a hard time genuflecting and moving during the incensing of the altar and during the offertory (he can't steady himself with his hand on the altar top while he's got a thurible in his hand).  Our priest got a dispensation from his bishop to bow during the incensing instead of genuflecting.  I MC during High Mass and all three of us, during the incensing of the altar and at the offertory, make a profound bow as we move in front of the tabernacle.

We also have a lady in my chapel who is wheelchair bound.  When the congregation goes up to recieve,  one of the ushers wheels her up to the altar rail and Father and the server with the paten come down from behind the altar gates and give her communion.  Christian charity, in this case, overrides the rubrics.
The Latin Mass is too hard on elderly priests, so we must create a new Mass?  Why don't they just phone it in?  LOL
(11-03-2010, 12:59 AM)paragon Wrote: [ -> ]The Latin Mass is too hard on elderly priests, so we must create a new Mass?  Why don't they just phone it in?  LOL

Don't talk too loud, someone might develop the text-Confession.
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