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When priests recite the Divine Office are they obliged to pray it in Latin? Do they have a translation on the side (like a missal) or does it not matter if they don't know what they're praying?
(11-18-2010, 01:44 AM)Servus_Maria Wrote: [ -> ]When priests recite the Divine Office are they obliged to pray it in Latin? Do they have a translation on the side (like a missal) or does it not matter if they don't know what they're praying?

I believe anyone who's bound to pray the Office and chooses to use the pre-Vatican II books must pray it in Latin. This is from the same principle that if you use a pre-Vatican II Missal for Mass, it also must be in Latin. You can't celebrate the Tridentine Mass in the vernacular (except for the Scripture readings, due to the permission in Summorum Pontificum which states the vernacular can be used for those).

If you're talking about the post-VII Liturgy of the Hours, then no, of course.
(11-18-2010, 01:49 AM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]
(11-18-2010, 01:44 AM)Servus_Maria Wrote: [ -> ]When priests recite the Divine Office are they obliged to pray it in Latin? Do they have a translation on the side (like a missal) or does it not matter if they don't know what they're praying?

I believe anyone who's bound to pray the Office and chooses to use the pre-Vatican II books must pray it in Latin. This is from the same principle that if you use a pre-Vatican II Missal for Mass, it also must be in Latin. You can't celebrate the Tridentine Mass in the vernacular (except for the Scripture readings, due to the permission in Summorum Pontificum which states the vernacular can be used for those).

If you're talking about the post-VII Liturgy of the Hours, then no, of course.

One would assume the priests know what they're praying though, right?
(11-18-2010, 01:44 AM)Servus_Maria Wrote: [ -> ]When priests recite the Divine Office are they obliged to pray it in Latin? Do they have a translation on the side (like a missal) or does it not matter if they don't know what they're praying?

You don't have to know every word, and i was even told by my priest that some religious with the obligation of the Office in the past were not sufficiently educated to understand beyond the simplest latin words. They were still able to pray well though, by having a general idea of what the psalm would treat of (through their training in the novitiate) and by above all praying with reverence and devotion and thinking of the themes of the liturgical season they were in.
(11-18-2010, 01:49 AM)Servus_Maria Wrote: [ -> ]One would assume the priests know what they're praying though, right?

That would be assuming a lot more intelligence than what most priests actually have. A trad priest may have a general idea of what the Latin says, but I can't say I've ever met a priest who was fluent enough in Latin to have a complete understanding of a Latin text at first glance.

To your original question, I don't think there's a full edition of the 1962 Breviary with a side-by-side translation. If there is, it would be huge and extremely expensive.

And no, I don't think a priest is expected to fully comprehend the Latin Office.
The way it was explained to me is it is the prayer of the Church. In that sense you are not praying for yourself. You are praying for those that can not, do not, or will not pray for themselves. The psalms are for the situation in which some of the Church finds itself, and you are pleading for them. Before the cataclysm a priest would have a pretty good understanding because he was trained in the language and he practiced it everyday. Yet when they went to Rome they spoke Italian. I think because Italian is easier, and Latin is a hard nut to crack and be fluent. If you have not studied Latin, like me, you will pick up the broad meaning as you recite it. Both HK and karyn_anne have given very good explanations. To me the thing to bear in mind is this, it is not like reading a book like the Imitation of Christ where you are wringing out the deep meaning, instead you are praying for others, and a general understanding is good, but as karyn_anne said way back in the day some religious didn't get the meaning but prayed well.
Because we are wounded from Original Sin and our souls struggle with concupiscence, bending our will to do God's work is sometimes all we can do.Here's a good site where the English is right below the Latin. I've used it after the Office to help with the meaning. I'd bet it can help you, too.

http://www.sacredbible.org/

Click on the study Bible in Latin and English.
tim
(11-18-2010, 06:33 AM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]To your original question, I don't think there's a full edition of the 1962 Breviary with a side-by-side translation. If there is, it would be huge and extremely expensive.

Collegeville edition. Three ordinary sized volumes. I picked up one volume recently for $CD 8.00.
Jovan if you see another deal like that, let me know, so I can get one.
tim
So when I pray the little office I ought to be praying it in latin?
(11-18-2010, 09:38 PM)ketchum Wrote: [ -> ]So when I pray the little office I ought to be praying it in latin?

Whoa, whoa, whoa. Hold on. A regular layman isn't bound to the same rules as a cleric or religious.

As a private devotion, the Office may obviously be prayed in the vernacular.

For fulfilling a cleric's or religious's daily obligation, if it's in the 1962 form, it must be in Latin. I don't know about the Little Office specifically. I think that for public singing of the Office in a church, it has to also be in Latin.
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