FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums

Full Version: Who is snuffing your neighbour's kittens? (Crypto-Trads at Christendom College?)
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
(04-20-2011, 05:04 AM)Cetil Wrote: [ -> ]I think you have more than just Arlington. Look at orders that have remained faithful to the Magisterium, they are flourishing such as the Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist. They were founded in 1997 with just four sisters, they now have over 100 and have been featured on "Oprah" twice. (Not that it matters but it's nice for them to get the exposure, so the secular world can see just how traditional religious life can still flourish). Their average age is 28! One can cite others such as the Franciscans of the Immaculate, founded in 1990 who now have over 400 members. There are other examples. Tradition is taking hold again in the Church and only those orders who embrace it will survive.

This 1996 article by Archbishop Elden Curtis is very much to the point also: http://www.ewtn.com/library/BISHOPS/WHATCRIS.HTM
The vocations "crisis" is contrived by those who wish to distort and destroy Catholic teaching. Imagine how green the polyester pant suits nuns must be when they see the Dominican Sisters and all the vocations they have. Left to their own devices they will wither and die. "By their fruits you shall know them".

C.

Yes - more than Arlington. Good link. I was already aware of the bright picture in Lincoln.

But I did not know about these orders though - and am thrilled! It is very good if they got on Oprah ...

All this needs exposure! The liberal and modern world needs to see, if it is capable of seeing ...

I wish someone would collect it all in a study or book ... Really if I were a Catholic publisher, I would commission such a book.

Maybe someday I will even try to take this on myself!. At least a long article for my site. Thus I will be keeping note of the orders, groups, links you have mentioned here Cetil and I thank you again.

Also for those in this thread who mentioned they were either moving to Arlington because of what's there or more specifically sending a young man or woman to Christendom, your impressions would be appreciated, should you have time or energy to record them.
I am reviving, yet again, an old thread I started with an admittedly provocative name.

The name refers to one of the strangest things I ever found on the internet ...

An utterly demented piece called Who is Snuffing Your Neighbour's Kittens which claims that Front Royal home to Christendom College in Virginia and the Arlington diocese in general are home to dangerous Catholic fascists who threaten America.

Link here: http://www.larouchepub.com/other/2002/29...kttns.html

What is so bizarre about it is that its clearly not the result of a bad acid trip somebody had one night and put up on the internet - but clearly years of extensive paranoid research into the "dangerous traditionalists in Virginia".

Who moreover, don't really look exactly like OVERT Trads and hence my silly name: Crypto-Trads ...

Why revive it? Well, I like this thread. People say some VERY interesting things in it. Plus, I never understood the stigma here against reviving old threads. Why not if there is something new to say?

And Jacob has recently provided us with something very relevant, incredibly fascinating regarding this thread in another thread:


[quote='Jacob' pid='1216911' dateline='1384530642']
Roger, here are a couple of more links and books you may want to check out:

The Rise and Fall of Triumph: The History of a Radical Roman Catholic Magazine, 1966-1976 by Mark D. Popowski.
This book is a secular, but extremely sympathetic look at the magazine and its history.  I read it this last summer and got a lot out of it.  I ordered it through my library, but if you want to buy, it's here new, or you can find it used at Amazon.  Popowski's dissertation upon which the book is based can be found here in PDF.  I read someplace that his next project is a biography of Frederick Wilhelmsen, whom he knew as a student.

Living on Fire: The Life of L. Brent Bozell Jr. by Daniel Kelly.  It is to be released on January 31 of next year.  I saw it while searching around yesterday.
[quote]The Brilliant, Tormented Pioneer of the Conservative Movement and the Christian Right

From the beginning, L. Brent Bozell seemed destined for great things. An extraordinary orator, the young man with fiery red hair won a national debate competition in high school and later was elected president of Yale’s storied Political Union, where his debating partner was his close friend William F. Buckley Jr. In less than a decade after graduating from Yale, Bozell helped Buckley launch National Review, became a popular columnist and speaker, and, most famously, wrote Barry Goldwater’s landmark book The Conscience of a Conservative.

But after setting his sights on high political office, Bozell took a different route in the 1960s. He abruptly moved his family to Spain; he founded a traditional Catholic magazine, Triumph, that quickly turned radical; he repudiated on religious grounds the U.S. Constitution; he made it his mission to transform America into a Catholic nation; he led a militant antiabortion group known as the Sons of Thunder; he severed ties with his erstwhile friends from the conservative movement, including Buckley (who was also his brother-in-law). By the mid-1970s, Bozell had fallen prey to bipolar disorder and alcoholism, leading life as if “manacled to a roller coaster,” as a friend put it.

Biographer Daniel Kelly tells Bozell’s remarkable story vividly and with sensitivity in Living on Fire. To write this book, Kelly interviewed dozens of friends and family members and gained unprecedented access to Bozell’s private correspondence. The result is a richly textured portrait of a gifted, complex man—his triumphs as well as his struggles.

Once destined for Capitol Hill, L. Brent Bozell wound up working in Washington soup kitchens just blocks away. Bringing mercy to the poor became his vocation—and, as Living on Fire shows, he succeeded admirably by the standards he came to embrace.[/quote]


That PDF you link to Jacob is incredibly, incredibly interesting. Thank you!

I will comment soon on that extremely fascinating PDF ...


I think what the above PDF Jacob has linked to illumines so well - is just how RADICAL the roots of Christendom College are.

I would say the vision here is as radical and uncompromising as that of Archbishop LeFebvre and yet the manner and strategy by which that vision is lived out is poles apart from the SSPX.

Anyone who is interested in what I mean will need to read the PDF and possibly compare to Who is Snuffing Your Neighbour's Kittens?

For the moment, I will just paste in this stirring passage from the PDF. I'm adding some bold ...



Quote:On the morning of June 6, 1970, approximately three hundred people gathered for a pro-life demonstration across the street from George Washington University Clinic in Washington, D.C. Many of them carried either processional crucifixes or self-made wooden crosses, while others held banners and placards—one read: “If killing babies is legal, what isn’t?”

The most striking visual was a contingent of young men dressed in khaki pants and shirts. They wore red berets, rosaries around their necks, and patches of the Sacred Heart of Jesus on their breast pockets. Many of them clutched the yellow and white papal flag, adorned with crossed keys and the ornate papal crown.

The crowd had congregated around an equestrian statue of George Washington. At its base stood a middle-aged man with thick, curly dark hair; his face personified fury. He spoke to the crowd:

There is a judgment passed on the nations by the Lord of time. . . And when America faces its God on that awesome day and when He asks America ‘What did you do for these the least of My little ones?’ America will answer ‘Lord, we killed them while they were indeed the least of Thy little ones so that they could not be a nuisance to us.’ And then the Lord God, our Incarnate King, Christ, will answer: ‘Go you, America, into outer darkness where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth. I and all my angels vomit you out because you have done this to Me and to My Mother, your Queen.’ America, you have become a nuisance to God.

At the conclusion of his speech he held out a silver cross and exclaimed:

And therefore we take upon ourselves this morning, and we swear not to lay it down in our lifetime, the Holy Cross of crusade against the enemies of life and its Creator . . . Dear God—give us the grace to embrace this Cross. Christus vivit. Christus regnat. Christus imperat. Long live Christ the King! Viva Cristo Rey!

The uniformed men answered, “Viva Cristo Rey,” which the crowd then repeated.

Next, a tall, lanky redhead stood at the base of the Washington statue and addressed the crowd as he pointed to the clinic across the street:

Christians will go to that building this morning in the name of their King . . . A delegation of them will go inside the walls to receive from the executioners a promise that the King’s reign will be honored in that place. They will seek enforcement of His command, Thou shalt not murder; they will seek to baptize and to bury in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Ghost. . . . They will not leave willingly until the King’s rule has returned.


He pulled on a red beret, grabbed a large wooden cross, and led the crowd across the street toward the clinic. Five of the demonstrators, including the lanky redhead, entered the clinic and scuffled with police officers. Outside, the uniformed men prayed the rosary on their knees. The five men who had infiltrated the clinic were arrested; they shouted “Viva Cristo Rey” as they were led outside to a police wagon—the crowd roared “Viva Cristo Rey” in response.


I can just begin to glimpse why Mr Kittens is so paranoid ...

And I definitely hope to visit Front Royal Virginia, some day ...

I am inclined to think this thread is not worth reviving, for the simple reason that the Larouche gang have always put lots of "research" into whatever they felt like. And somehow it is all supposed to make sense. But it doesn't!  I used to see them on the streets of Washington in the 1980's when they would grab people and rant about Henry Kissinger who of course was really KGB. After that came a strange fixation and attack on Queen Elizabeth II as a drug pusher! Not only does she push them but she and the Rothchilds control international drug trafficking. Uh-huh, sure.  And all of it backed by gobs of "research".

C.
Sorry, I haven't read the entire thread yet, but from what I know, Seton is extremely popular for homeschooling, by both conservative NO people and many trads. Homeschooling, as a rule, has grown exponentially compared to both private and public schools in the past decade or so. No only does it have solid academics and excellent support, because it also can act as an "umbrella school" of sorts it gets around a lot of the reporting and oversight rules in certain states.

Christendom is a very popular school for Catholic homeschoolers because it receives no government money, therefore no government meddling. That's a critical consideration for many homeschooling parents and homeschooled children.

Homeschooling and ... let's call it "strong Catholism" ... tend to go hand-in-hand I think in part because of the desire to keep government out. Both seem to be thriving in Virginia.
(11-19-2013, 10:13 AM)PrairieMom Wrote: [ -> ]Homeschooling and ... let's call it "strong Catholism" ... Both seem to be thriving in Virginia.

Just to be clear - this is what I find so very meaningful about this thread.

I agree with Cetil above - what Mr. Kittens says doesn't make sense.

But the fact that he is so alarmed/paranoid about the Arlington Virginia diocese and the activities of Christendom/Seton gives a lot to ponder when you look at both his crazed commentary and what has being go on there since Triumph magazine moved to Front Royal back in 1970, Christendom College was established in 1977 etc.

This is a review of the Popowski book that is based on his research done for the dissertation/PDF.

I want to throw out one of the comments at the bottom for discussion:
Quote:Very interesting article, thank you! And to think somebody actually remembers Triumph Magazine. I attended one of their summer sessions at El Escorial outside of Madrid. I too was fascinated by the ‘crazy’ and entertaining rapid-fire Prof Wilhelm.

One of Triumph’s [still living] contributors take on Triumph’s failure was that they got ‘soft’ on the modernist influences in the Church, including the changes in the Liturgy. Also, after much research into the beginnings of America, this contributor discovered the irreconcilable ethos of the founders with the Catholic Church, including a surprising link with Freemasons in the Irish American Church hierarchy. There suddenly existed a split of monarchists and supporters of modern government at Triumph.

Triumph Magazine started as a bastion for Catholic American intellectuals. When this basis watered down, so did the contributors, the funds, and the interest – Triumph then stood for nothing.

At our present point in time, it is easy to become convinced that no real intellectuals exist in America, or anyone who knows the non-modernist Catholic Faith. How can anyone ever find them now?

I'm sure Bozell and Wilhelmsen fell in the camp of the monarchists.  I wonder where Carroll and those who went on to help him found Christendom fell.

The point about the liturgy is interesting.  The Triumph people were loyal in a time of great rebellion, so they naturally went with the NO, though with reservations and sadness.  By the time the magazine and the society running it fell apart in 1975, the strain over the liturgical abuses apparent must have been intolerable.  According to Triumph's Wikipedia article, Archbishop Lefebvre contributed.  I wonder when and how often he did so.
The fact that this came from a LaRouche publication says all. It should not be taken seriously. At all.
Reading back through the old part of this thread, I see Cetil answered my question about Warren Carroll before I asked it.
(11-20-2010, 12:09 AM)Cetil Wrote: [ -> ]Warren Carroll is a traditional Catholic, a convert who worked and sweated unbelievably to found Christendom College and keep it going despite many obstacles. He has written several very good books such as "Red Banners, White Mantle" (about the Russian revolution and Fatima) and more besides on traditional Catholic history. Dr. Carroll is very influenced by Spanish Catholicism and is kind of a monarchist but realizes its limits and that it would not work everywhere. He is definitely a supporter of the Carlists but only because he considered them the most authentic Catholics of the various contenders for the Spanish throne. Anne Carroll founded Seton High School in Manassas Virginia and is a fine Catholic too. She is also the founder of Seton Home Study. Frederick Wilhelmsen was a philosophy professor at the University of Dallas and a Thomist. L. Brent Bozell is a conservative political commentator, I'm not sure if he's still around but is also a trad. Catholic. Dr. Carroll accepts the authority of the Catholic church as does the college itself. Are they theocratics? I think most trad Catholics would prefer to live in a state that confessed the Catholic faith. But I don't think anyone at Christendom would try to impose such a thing by force.
(11-19-2013, 06:57 PM)Jacob Wrote: [ -> ]Reading back through the old part of this thread, I see Cetil answered my question about Warren Carroll before I asked it.
(11-20-2010, 12:09 AM)Cetil Wrote: [ -> ]Warren Carroll is a traditional Catholic, a convert who worked and sweated unbelievably to found Christendom College and keep it going despite many obstacles. He has written several very good books such as "Red Banners, White Mantle" (about the Russian revolution and Fatima) and more besides on traditional Catholic history. Dr. Carroll is very influenced by Spanish Catholicism and is kind of a monarchist but realizes its limits and that it would not work everywhere. He is definitely a supporter of the Carlists but only because he considered them the most authentic Catholics of the various contenders for the Spanish throne. Anne Carroll founded Seton High School in Manassas Virginia and is a fine Catholic too. She is also the founder of Seton Home Study. Frederick Wilhelmsen was a philosophy professor at the University of Dallas and a Thomist. L. Brent Bozell is a conservative political commentator, I'm not sure if he's still around but is also a trad. Catholic. Dr. Carroll accepts the authority of the Catholic church as does the college itself. Are they theocratics? I think most trad Catholics would prefer to live in a state that confessed the Catholic faith. But I don't think anyone at Christendom would try to impose such a thing by force.

May he rest in peace, I knew him personally and his labor and self sacrifice are legendary, the stuff of sanctity if I can dare to pretend to any knowledge of such things. And as president of the college he accepted the lowest salary of all. The groundskeeper of the school was paid more. He and his wife never owned a home or bought a new car. They lived in a simple apartment and had no hobbies or outside interests that I ever heard of. Their sole interest was service to God and His Church.

C.
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11